Sad sights among the joyful

December 10th, 2013

I was waiting for the bus on 50th Street and Fifth Avenue in Manhattan last evening. This is a great crossroad at any time of year, but especially at Christmas. People were streaming into St. Patrick’s Cathedral to venerate relics of St. Anthony. They also were looking to visit the world-famous and, if you have seen it, absolutely unique Cathedral Christmas crèche. Woof!

Others were crowding into Rockefeller Center’s Channel Gardens to see the Christmas tree. Meanwhile, some music that sounded like Mike Oldfield’s “Tubular Bells” colliding with heavy metal rock was blasting through the street. The sidewalk was practically vibrating

This part of Manhattan is full of tourists right now. You can always pick out the Irish and the Brits. They tend to move toward the left when they navigate through crowds. They get pummeled by the locals, who do the New York two-step to the right and crash into them. The best, of course, are the people on their cell phones. No matter what or who hits them, they seem unperturbed and continue with their conversations.

But there are some sad sights, too. It seems to me that there are so many more homeless persons around this Christmas. Some of them have dogs and from the look of the animals, they’re better cared for by their owners than their owners are by us.  I just read in the papers this morning of the staggering number of children — 22,000 — who are homeless in New York City right now, this from a series currently running in The New York Times.

There a lots of ways to help these people in need. You need look no farther than our own Catholic Charities, which assists everyone, no exceptions, and has many options for you to choose for giving.

Mary and Joseph knew what it was like to be without a home, even for a little while. Just when Mary was about to give birth, they had no place to stay. And when He was born, their Son was homeless, too.

Did you or someone you love miss out on Confirmation?

November 26th, 2013

It happens so easily.  Your family moved a lot and somehow your religious education got interrupted.  Yes, you are a faithful Catholic, you go to Mass, and you have received your First Communion. But for any number of reasons, you never received the Sacrament of Confirmation. And now you are an adult, perhaps you are planning to be married in the Catholic Church, and you will be asked if you have been confirmed. Perhaps your fiancé missed out on the sacrament.

What to do? You don’t want to be in a children’s class. And because you have been baptized and received your First Communion, you don’t belong in the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults.  But you do want to know all about the meaning and grace of this sacrament of initiation.

Well, there is an answer. If you live in New York City or Westchester: beginning Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014, the Archdiocesan Catechetical Office will offer an eight-week preparation course followed by a Confirmation Mass on Tuesday, April 22. The site is the lovely Church of Our Lady of Peace in Manhattan.

If you live in the counties north of Westchester or in Rockland, Orange or Sullivan County, the same will be available for you at the Church of the Sacred Heart in the City of Newburgh, beginning Thursday, April 10, and seven Thursdays to follow. Confirmation will take place at Mass on Sunday, June 8.

Why I am telling you so far in advance? We are about to step into the annual holidays madness, beginning this Thursday with Thanksgiving. You do need to register in advance. You will need some documentation, especially your Baptism and First Communion certificates. All the information, fees, etc. can be found here.

So if you are interested in being confirmed, now is the time to make your plans. Then you can settle down and enjoy Thanksgiving. May it be a happy day for you and those you love.

Celebrating our Catechists and Catechetical Leaders

November 5th, 2013

On Sunday, Nov. 17, the Archdiocesan Catechetical Office will honor men and women who devote so much of their lives to the catechetical or religious education ministry. I am referring, of course, to our parish catechists and catechetical leaders. The annual Certification and Recognition Ceremony will take place at Maryknoll in Ossining. Msgr. Edward Weber, director of priest personnel, will preside. Catechists and catechetical leaders who have completed training and supervision will be officially certified by our office. Certified catechists who have given 25 or more years to the ministry will receive the Catechetical Medal Honor.

The ceremony will also feature the presentation of the Terence Cardinal Cooke Award to pastors, recently retired, whose parish catechetical programs demonstrated their outstanding support for the catechetical ministry; the Good Shepherd Award, presented to catechetical leaders and colleagues of the ministry whose lives and actions reflect  Jesus the Good Shepherd; and the John Cardinal O’Connor Award, given to catechetical leaders whose ministry to persons with disabilities and their families is exceptional.

It takes a great deal of dedication, selflessness, time and preparation to become a proficient catechist or catechetical leader. It takes great energy and creativity to maintain excellence in a parish program, whether there are 200 or 1,000 students. Everyone deserves the best.  It also takes a true missionary spirit because catechesis is at the heart of the Church’s mission to evangelize. Amazingly, almost no parish catechists receive financial remuneration and the catechetical leader is definitely not the highest paid person on the parish payroll.

However, if you stop and think about it, the catechists and catechetical leaders are some of the best evangelizers in the archdiocese. They reach out to parents, grandparents, siblings and family friends. They work hard to celebrate cultural diversity. They support the rights of persons with disabilities and their families to faith formation and make it happen for them. More times than you know, it’s their missionary spirit that brings people back to the church.

So, on Sunday, the 17th, perhaps you will whisper a thank-you to God for these selfless men and women, who give so much of their lives to the ministry of catechesis, helping their students and families to develop a closer relationship with the person of Jesus Christ.

Worship. Witness. Celebrate. Receive and Proclaim God’s Love!

October 16th, 2013

 

Well, that sounds like a tall order, doesn’t it? Actually, you can put all these verbs into one: evangelize.

And you are an evangelist by virtue of your baptism. But how do you carry out the vision of evangelization in your home, in your workplace and, of course, among the members of your faith community, active or not active? Well, your friends at the Archdiocese and our friends in other ministries have  planned a day that will help you to carry out your call to worship, witness, celebrate, receive and proclaim Christ’s love.

Mark this date – Saturday, Nov. 9 – on your calendar, your smartphone, your tablet…whatever you use to keep track of important events. The annual Adult Faith Formation and Evangelization Forum will take place that day at the McGinley Center on Fordham University’s Bronx campus.

Come and meet a top-notch roster of presenters in English and Spanish tracks, including Fr. Matt Malone, SJ, editor-in-chief of America Magazine (of papal interview fame): Dr. Colt Anderson, the dynamic dean of the Fordham University Graduate School of Religion and Religious Education;  John Roberto, whose Lifelong Faith Associates can help you plan a dynamic adult faith program in your own parish;  the international religious musician, Hermana Glenda; Fr. Lorenzo Ato, radio personality and assistant director of Hispanic Ministry at the Archdiocese;  and too many more to list here.

Make plans to join us and discover what the New Evangelization means to you and the other adults of your parish. Read all about it here and register today. And invite others to join you. It’s what evangelists do!

Help for Harried Catechists: The Catechetical Forums are coming your way

September 27th, 2013

A few weeks ago, I was talking to a man who just started teaching in his parish religious education program.  He told me that nothing in his life (including being a dad himself) had prepared him for the ordeal of facing a room full of third-graders.  “I was terrified,” he said.

Catechizing youngsters has always been a daunting task but today more than ever, a catechist has to bring a veritable teacher’s tool kit, filled with age-appropriate faith formation, pedagogical know-how and plenty of psychology to the program.  Knowledge of technology also is becoming a “must.”

It’s not about getting the children’s attention but rather keeping it. Today, even the youngest children are more adept with technology than most adults and are far more easily distracted than children 10 years ago.  For a variety of reasons, many of them beyond their control, parents are not always able to reinforce at home what the children are learning about the faith.  More and more, a catechist has to act as the primary catechist of a child when this is really a parent’s responsibility.

But how in the world can a catechist keep up with the rapidly changing learning environment of a parish program?  Well, this is why the Catechetical Office will offer its annual Catechetical Forums on Oct. 5 at Sacred Heart Parish in Monroe and on Oct. 19 at Cardinal Spellman High School in the Bronx.  Both keynoters, Joe Paprocki  (English language) from Chicago and Marta McGlade (Spanish)  from the Atlanta archdiocese are national consultants, well known in the catechetical ministry. But – and this is even more important – they are active catechists in their parishes. They know exactly what today’s catechist confronts.

In addition to the keynoters, there will be dozens of helpful workshops offering enrichment for religious educators themselves, along with the kind of hands-on, practical advice that only trained experts and veterans of the catechetical ministry can provide.

So, if you are a catechist, or you are thinking of becoming one, don’t miss the Catechetical Forums. Visit www.nyfaithformation.org   to check more on the keynoters and the workshop topics.  See you there.

30 years of ministry and filled with wisdom.

September 20th, 2013

In his unprecedented interview yesterday, Pope Francis likened the relationship between the ancient Catholic churches and the young churches to the relationship between young and elderly people in a society.  He said, “[The young] build the future with their strength and the others with their wisdom.”

When I read those words, I thought of 22 older women and men who were honored last Saturday at St. Joseph Seminary. Fifteen of them were directors and coordinators of parish religious education programs 30 years ago when Terence Cardinal Cooke established the Archdiocesan Catechetical Office. We call them the Founders.  Practically all of them still are catechetical leaders and are full of energy for their ministry. One of them, Sr. Mary Rose Mullervy, OP, recently was honored by her parish, St. Anastasia in Harriman, which named its religious education center after her. Seven founding members of the Archdiocesan Catechetical Office also were recognized at the seminary.

The occasion was the opening of a yearlong celebration of the Catechetical Office’s 30th anniversary. Edward Cardinal Egan, archbishop emeritus of New York, celebrated the Eucharistic Liturgy and then joined Sr. Joan Curtin, CND, director of the Catechetical Office, in presenting icons of Jesus and Mary to those 22 founders.

The Catechetical Office also established the Edward Michael Cardinal Egan Award for extraordinary leadership. Cardinal Egan served as the vicar for education in New York from 1985 to 1988. With his support and guidance, the Catechetical Office developed the training and protocols that were to become models of professionalism to the rest of the United States. It was only fitting, therefore, that the first recipient of the award be Cardinal Egan himself.

I invite you to read about this special group of people  and view the  photo album.   You might find your own parish catechetical leader there.

Just imagine all the wisdom that this group of people brings to the formation of Catholics in this archdiocese. I think Pope Francis would be delighted to know of them.

 

 

Prayers for Peace

September 6th, 2013

The Holy Father has made an urgent plea to all the people of the world to set aside tomorrow, Saturday, Sept. 7, as a day of prayer and fasting for a peaceful solution to the crisis in Syria. Here is his statement.  Cardinal Dolan has added his own request to the family of the Archdiocese of New York.

If you are a director or coordinator of a parish religious education program that meets on Saturday, please invite those in your program and their families  to offer their prayers as well.

For those of you who will be in midtown Manhattan tomorrow, Archbishop Francis Chullikatt, the Holy See’s  ambassador to the United Nations, will offer a Mass at 5:30 pm at St. Patrick’s Cathedral. Please come and, by all means, invite your family and friends to join you there.

 

 

Augustine and his views about women

August 27th, 2013

August 28 is the feast of one of Christianity’s greatest philosophers, St. Augustine of Hippo. However, these days he’s getting a bit of bad rap, particularly when it comes to women. Granted, he did believe and write that women were subordinate and therefore should be obedient to men. But he was a product of his time and culture.  No one thought women were equal to men.

Augustine and his Christian contemporaries read the Bible, including the Book of Genesis, literally and as an historical document.  They did not know of evolution. They did not understand human biology as we of the 21st century do. As far as Augustine and every other Christian knew, the first woman was formed from the first man’s rib (Gen.2:21-23). Because she was formed from the male, she and all the women who followed her must be subordinate.

But let’s be fair here.  The man died in 430 AD, 1,583 years ago. To pick and choose quotations from Augustine’s huge body of work, pull them out of their historical context, including the scientific knowledge and scriptural interpretation of the time, and then use them to support or debunk a viewpoint of today is not fair. It’s also not good scholarship.

So what did Augustine really think of women? For help in answering this question, I turned to my good friend, Father Allan D. Fitzgerald, O.S.A., director of the Augustinian Institute at Villanova University in Pennsylvania. He has provided this excerpt from an article about Augustine and women by the late Tarcisius Van Bavel, O.S.A. (1923-2007), a highly respected modern scholar of Augustine. Van Bavel was the director of the Augustinian Historical Institute in Heverlee, Belgium, and was professor of Theology at the Catholic University of Leuven, also in Belgium.

I hope that you will take a few minutes to read this piece.  You might find a surprise or two in the last paragraph. And be sure to check out Villanova’s Augustinian Institute for more about the fascinating bishop of Hippo.

“From the study of Augustine’s texts, it appears undoubtedly that the man occupies the central place in social life. The woman is always compared to and measured by the man. We must admit that Augustine’s view is androcentric. Woman is the weaker sex, subordinate to the man and owing him obedience. In the question of subordination of women, Augustine is not only influenced by the social ideas of his time, but also — and perhaps more — by the Bible. He read the paradise story in a historical way: the first human beings lived in a perfect paradisial situation; only later they degraded because of sin. Augustine starts from an idealized picture of the first human couple, whereas we modern people expect human perfection to come only in the future. What he read as a story about the beginning, we read as a story about the end. Modern science tells us that human beings began on a very primitive level, and that they developed only slowly in a long process of evolution. For Augustine it was more or less the opposite. This implies considerable differences in view and evaluation. Augustine had to base himself on the science of his day, and could not know or realize how much the biblical narratives were socially and culturally conditioned, in general and in particular regarding the relationship between male and female. For this reason it was difficult for him to consider libido as something belonging originally to human nature. However, he was not completely mistaken in his observation of libido. Many psychologists, especially of the psychoanalytic school, would agree with him in seeing sexual libido as an ambiguous force. To consider libido simply as a good would be naive; it is also a source of evil. On this point Augustine was more realistic than Julian of Eclanum.

      We should not be blind for the positive aspects of Augustine’s view. More than once he breaks through traditional Christian opinions, opening new perspectives and instigating further evolution. It is a pity that some of his ideas have had no greater influence on posterity. Some of these positive elements of his thought are taken over from his predecessors; others are corrections of the opinions of his predecessors. The idea of the moral superiority of women is borrowed from the best of Christian tradition.  In the question of woman as the image of God, he corrects the opinion of several theologians who wrote before him. Woman is created in the image of God; she is the image of God by nature; and not only through Christ’s grace conferred in baptism. The same must be said regarding the presence of the female body and sex in the resurrected state of the human being. This had been denied by influential authors before him. An important point is further his protest against the discrimination of women by civil law. In doing so he assailed social injustice in his own day. He criticized vehemently and intrepidly this kind of discrimination. Augustine’s own and most important contribution to a change within the relationship between husband and wife is, according to me, his emphasis on love in married life, and even more his interpretation of the conjugal relationship as friendship. In the Christian tradition before him this was seldom or never done.”

Augustine’s View on Women, Augustiniana 39 (1989) 5-53.

Welcome and dignity for immigrants

July 9th, 2013

Whenever I pass St. Patrick’s Cathedral, I am reminded of the 19th century Catholic immigrants, who helped to build it with the sweat of their brows and whatever they could give of their paltry economic resources.

For them, the Cathedral was more than a magnificent church building. It was a symbol of their right to make a life for themselves and their families in the United States, and of their resistance to the Nativist movement that tried to prevent them from doing so.

The Catholic Church is on the side of the immigrant and that is why it is important for religious educators and others to be knowledgeable on this topic, particularly these days as the Congress considers immigration reform.  This is part of the church’s social teaching.

Here in the United States, the Church’s support for immigration reform is demonstrated in this statement by Archbishop Jose H. Gomez, archbishop of Los Angeles and chairman of the USCCB Committee on Migration, on June 28 during a telephone press conference with the USCCB leadership. Archbishop Gomez commended the U.S. Senate for its passage of a comprehensive immigration reform bill and called for the House of Representatives to do likewise.

Pope Francis himself provided a powerful witness in actions and words in his visit yesterday (Monday) to the Mediterranean island of Lampedusa. During his mass for those migrants who lost their lives trying to reach this refuge, he addressed the plight of all migrants and their conditions.

“‘Where is your brother?’ the voice of his blood cries even to me, God says. This is not a question addressed to others: it is a question addressed to me, to you, to each one of us.  These our brothers and sisters seek to leave difficult situations in order to find a little serenity and peace, they seek a better place for themselves and for their families – but they found death. How many times do those who seek this not find understanding, do not find welcome, do not find solidarity! And their voices rise up even to God!”

Here is the entire text from Vatican Radio.

The website of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has a host of other resources for catechists (including the primary catechists of children, their parents) and others interested in learning more about Catholic Social teaching on immigrants and migration.

By the way, your knowledge and articulation of Catholic teaching on immigration will demonstrate that the Catholic Church is certainly not “a one-issue Church” as some have sought to portray us. Justice for the immigrant is now and always will be a high priority for our community of believers in this nation of immigrants.