Posts Tagged ‘American Bible Society’

Two opportunities to explore the Bible

Tuesday, May 28th, 2013

This coming Saturday, June 1, the New York Catholic Bible School, which is sponsored by the Archdiocesan Catechetical Office, will hold a graduation ceremony  at the Church of St. Margaret of Antioch in Pearl River, N.Y.  Thirty men and woman will each receive a Certificate of Basic Bible Study. This means that they have completed a two-year course of study in Sacred Scripture.  I am happy to report that most, if not all, are going on to complete the entire four-year cycle, during which they will read, pray on, and reflect on every book of the Bible. Hopefully, they will go back to their parishes to encourage and perhaps lead Bible study group themselves.

As you can imagine, preparing for class and meeting every week, usually at the end of a work day, requires a great deal of dedication.  People from every walk of life and educational background are enrolled What is it about Sacred Scripture that brings these men and women back week after week, year after year? They have found the Word of God and they are finding themselves, too.

Perhaps you might be interested in studying the Bible,  learning how to read it, reflect on it, and pray on it. Here’s a suggestion.  Spend a day with the Bible.

On Saturday, June 22, the Archdiocesan Catechetical Office and the American Bible Society will sponsor their fourth annual New York Catholic Bible Summit at Cathedral High School in the New York Catholic Center, 350 East 56th Street, Manhattan. This year’s theme, very appropriate for the Year of Faith, is “Preach the Gospel to the Whole of Creation.”

As always, the day will begin with the Sacred Liturgy in the Church of St. John the Evangelist, also in the Catholic Center on the 55th Street side.  Timothy Michael Cardinal Dolan will be the principal celebrant.

There will be two complete tracks in English and Spanish. Rev. James Martin, SJ, author and editor-at-large for America Magazine, will give the English keynote. Father Martin’s new e-book, Together on Retreat — Meeting Jesus in Prayer, will help you to pray with Scripture. The Spanish language keynoter is Jesús Rubén Cardinal Salazar Gómez, Archbishop of Bogota, Colombia, and vice president of the Latin-American Conference of Catholic Bishops.  Check here for a full listing of our presenters, along with details on registration. Don’t wait until the last minute to register, however.

A day with the Bible. Who knows? Your next step might be the New York Catholic Bible School.

“From Ashe to Amen” at the Museum of Biblical Art

Monday, April 15th, 2013

The recent Tiffany exhibit at the Museum of Biblical Art on Broadway and 60th Street, in the headquarters of the American Bible Society, was enthusiastically received by New York art critics. As they say in another art form, it was tough act to follow.

However, MOBIA, as the museum is familiarly known, has come up with another  beautiful and inspiring show, this time examining the religious art of African Americans and its relationship to Sacred Scripture.  The exhibit is called “From Ashe to Amen: African Americans and Biblical Imagery” and will be open until May 26.  The term ashe is a Yoruba word from Nigeria and is familiar to Africans and African Americans; it means inspiration. However, someone else used an even more descriptive definition: an inner eye. Amen, of course, means “so be it.”

The exhibit features about 60 pieces, among which are some that especially fascinated me.  Horace Pippin’s “The Holy Mountain” appears at first to be a depiction of the peaceable kingdom in a lush green forest.  A closer examination reveals that hidden in the trees are tanks and other symbols of war and violence against people.  It is startling and disturbing. Pippin, a World War I veteran, painted this in 1945 at the close of the Second World War.

Clementine Hunter’s “Baby Jesus and the Three Wisemen” re-imagines the Magi’s visit in Louisiana.  Another piece, a magnificently carved door, also features the Magi, who are carrying gifts of a more practical nature than gold, frankincense and myrrh, but also inspired by Scripture.

Joan M.E. Graham’s “My Spiritual Family” contains over a hundred small portraits on a mixed media quilt.  Charles Alston’s “Midnight Vigil,” painted in 1936, is a deathbed scene with a community raising prayers to heaven for the dying person.

The pieces and media, including video, are so varied that it would be hard to pick a favorite but, if pressed, I might opt for a beautiful fan, the mainstay of  women in the days before churches were air conditioned. The fan features the face of the great jazz singer and song writer, Billie Holiday.

One of the most appealing aspects of the Museum of Biblical Art is that its size, one large gallery room, almost guarantees that every piece in an exhibition is going to be special. There’s room only for the best of the best.  A visitor can take in an exhibit during an evening after work or on a few lunch hours.  Of course, it would take more than single lunch hour to enjoy the current exhibit. Unlike most of other museums in the city, it is free.  You can read more about MOBIA and its exhibits here.

 

Art at the service of evangelization

Friday, October 19th, 2012

Often when we look at religious stained glass windows or mosaics, we have to crane our necks because they are above eye level.  We don’t always get to appreciate the fine work, the detail, and the precision that go into creating these pieces, many of which could be considered visual evangelization and catechesis.

This is a particular loss when it comes to the devotional art of Louis Comfort Tiffany (1948-1933) and his studio, which created devotional and other works for a fifty-year period that spanned what is often referred to as “the gilded age.”

While Tiffany worked in many media, his name is most associated with a unique style of stained glass. He and his team didn’t just use glass creatively. They created special glass that was streaky, opalescent and delicately tinted. These glass styles enabled the subjects of the windows to appear animated and filled with emotion. Backgrounds acquired dimension. Clothing looked so real that one wanted to reach out and touch the fabric. It’s not always easy to appreciate all this from ten feet below the window or across the nave of a church.

Now, the Museum of Biblical Art (MOBIA), which is located at the headquarters of the American Bible Society on 61 Street and Broadway in Manhattan, has provided a unique opportunity for us to see at eye level or close to it the genius of Tiffany devotional art. It’s an extraordinary collection.

There are stained glass windows from the Driehaus and Neudstadt collections, the Corning Museum of Glass, several churches, and many other sources. From St. Andrew’s Dune Church of Southampton, N.Y., there is a touching window from the legend of Arthur: young Galahad in pursuit of the Holy Grail. It is a memorial for an eighteen year-old boy.  A larger window is titled “Lydia Entertaining Christ and His Apostles.” However, MOBIA’s curators think Lydia is more likely entertaining Paul, Timothy and Silas. According to the Acts of the Apostles, she met the three of them at Philippi in Asia Minor (Acts 16:13-15.)

MOBIA’s exhibit also contains magnificent mosaics, including one named “Fathers of the Church,” featuring St. John Chrysostom, St. Augustine of Hippo and St. Ambrose. And there’s more, too much more to itemize here.

Tiffany’s devotional art was commissioned mostly by Protestant and Jewish congregations. However, some Catholic Churches in our own archdiocese have Tiffany windows and the altar of St. Michael and St. Louis in St. Patrick’s Cathedral is associated with Tiffany. Maybe your church has a Tiffany touch.

The exhibit is on through Jan. 20, 2013, and admission is free.  You can preview the exhibition, “Louis C. Tiffany and the Art of Devotion, here.  If you really want a treat, find out when MOBIA’s own experts are giving tours.

Fine religious art can evangelize and catechize. The medieval cathedral builders knew that and filled their churches with stained glass and sculpture. The Renaissance painters and sculptures knew it, too. Certainly Tiffany understood the power of great devotional art. It’s true today.  Modern church art may be different from that of earlier periods but if it is good, it can be a powerful tool of evangelization. How appropriate for a Year of Faith.

It’s your Bible. Come celebrate it.

Friday, May 25th, 2012

For generations of Catholics, the least opened item on the bookshelf was the family Bible.  It would come out only when a name had to be inscribed as a birth, marriage or death.

Now, of course, many Catholics read the Bible, some daily. We owe this to the Second Vatican Council, which opened 50 years ago this coming autumn, and to a document from that council titled Dei Verbum, The Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation.  This constitution urged “all the Christian faithful… to learn by frequent reading of the divine Scriptures the “excellent knowledge of Jesus Christ” (Phil. 3:8).  It stated unequivocally, “For ignorance of the Scriptures is ignorance of Christ.”

The successors of Blessed John XXIII, the convener of Vatican II, have reinforced this message.  Just a few years ago, 2008, Pope Benedict XVI called a Synod on the Word of God. Afterwards, he wrote an exhortation titled Verbum Domini (The Word of the Lord). It would be great if you could read the whole document.  However, if you are pressed for time,  read this section.

Here’s why. The section is one of the reasons that since 2010, the Archdiocesan Catechetical Office and our good friends at the American Bible Society have co-sponsored the annual New York Catholic Bible Summit. This summit looks at the Bible from many of the aspects that Pope described.

This year’s summit is on Saturday, June 16, from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., at the New York Catholic Center, 350 East 56 Street in Manhattan. Our theme is “Joy and Hope in the Light of the Gospel.” It comes from another famous Vatican II document, Gaudium et Spes (Joy and Hope), The Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World.   We hope you will register for the Bible Summit and join us for an informative and inspiring experience.

We have two wonderful keynoters, Peter Cardinal Turkson, president of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace at the Vatican, and Archbishop Carlos Aguiar Retes, president of the Latin American Conference of Catholic Bishops. Our topics include Scripture and the New Evangelization, the environment, spirituality, history, prayer, discipleship and much more.  Here are details on the topics and their presenters in English and Spanish. The apostolic nuncio to the United States, Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, will be the principal celebrant and homilist at the opening Mass and our own archbishop, Timothy Cardinal Dolan will preside.

Hope you’ll join us on June 16.  We’ll be looking for you.

Tolle lege! Tolle lege! Then come find out more about Scripture.

Thursday, May 26th, 2011

“Tolle lege! Tolle lege!” “Pick it up and read it. Pick it up and read it.” That’s what children’s voices said to St. Augustine of Hippo when he was in despair ’way back in the late fourth century. The “it” was the Bible. He took the advice, picked up the Sacred Scripture,  and started to read Romans 13, 13-14. It changed his life…and ours, too, for that matter. That’s because Augustine went on to become one of the most influential philosophers of Christianity and of western civilization.

As Father Anthony Ciorra, a great friend of the Archdiocesan Catechetical Office, reminded our staff the other day, this is good advice for all us. The Bible is not simply that book that we pull off the shelf to record family births, weddings and deaths. It’s not just a wedding or religious jubilee gift. It’s the living Word of God, emphasis on living.

Sacred Scripture is inspired by the Holy Spirit to speak to all generations until the end of time. You could read the same passage on three different days or three different years, and discover each time that your understanding of that passage and of yourself is deepening.

Pope Benedict XVI, an admirer and scholar of St. Augustine of Hippo, released a wonderful exhortation recently, one that reminds us of the importance of picking up and reading our copies of the Bible. It’s called Verbum Domini and you might enjoy reading it.

Then do yourself a favor. Discover the liveliness, influence and relevance of the Word of God by coming to the Second Annual New York Catholic Bible Summit on Saturday, June 25, here at the Catholic Center and sponsored by the Archdiocesan Catechetical Office, the American Bible Society and Fordham University. It’s your chance to meet, hear and talk with some of today’s best scholars, historians, artists and musicians – a host of experts who will make Scripture a livelier experience than you ever dreamed. There will be workshops in both English and Spanish. Keynoters are the Rev. Donald Senior, CP, who edited the New American Bible and who is now president of the Catholic Theological Union; and the Rev. Gabriel Naranjo, CM, Secretario General de la Confederación Latinoamericana y Caribeña de Religiosas/os (CLAR) Bogotá, Colombia.  Among the many experts is New York’s’ own  Msgr. Robert Stern, president of the Catholic Near East Welfare Association, who will speak about the Holy Land, ancient and modern. That’s a timely topic and will give added context to our reading of the Word of God.   Find out about the rest of our speakers and register today, so we can get you into the workshop of your choice. If you prefer registering by mail, you have that option, too.

Hope to see you there.