Posts Tagged ‘Evangelization’

Celebrating our Catechists and Catechetical Leaders

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

On Sunday, Nov. 17, the Archdiocesan Catechetical Office will honor men and women who devote so much of their lives to the catechetical or religious education ministry. I am referring, of course, to our parish catechists and catechetical leaders. The annual Certification and Recognition Ceremony will take place at Maryknoll in Ossining. Msgr. Edward Weber, director of priest personnel, will preside. Catechists and catechetical leaders who have completed training and supervision will be officially certified by our office. Certified catechists who have given 25 or more years to the ministry will receive the Catechetical Medal Honor.

The ceremony will also feature the presentation of the Terence Cardinal Cooke Award to pastors, recently retired, whose parish catechetical programs demonstrated their outstanding support for the catechetical ministry; the Good Shepherd Award, presented to catechetical leaders and colleagues of the ministry whose lives and actions reflect  Jesus the Good Shepherd; and the John Cardinal O’Connor Award, given to catechetical leaders whose ministry to persons with disabilities and their families is exceptional.

It takes a great deal of dedication, selflessness, time and preparation to become a proficient catechist or catechetical leader. It takes great energy and creativity to maintain excellence in a parish program, whether there are 200 or 1,000 students. Everyone deserves the best.  It also takes a true missionary spirit because catechesis is at the heart of the Church’s mission to evangelize. Amazingly, almost no parish catechists receive financial remuneration and the catechetical leader is definitely not the highest paid person on the parish payroll.

However, if you stop and think about it, the catechists and catechetical leaders are some of the best evangelizers in the archdiocese. They reach out to parents, grandparents, siblings and family friends. They work hard to celebrate cultural diversity. They support the rights of persons with disabilities and their families to faith formation and make it happen for them. More times than you know, it’s their missionary spirit that brings people back to the church.

So, on Sunday, the 17th, perhaps you will whisper a thank-you to God for these selfless men and women, who give so much of their lives to the ministry of catechesis, helping their students and families to develop a closer relationship with the person of Jesus Christ.

Evangelization begins with hospitality

Thursday, April 4th, 2013

Evangelization has been the responsibility and joy of every Christian ever since Jesus himself gave us our direction in Matthew 28: 18-20. Making disciples of all peoples, baptizing them (even if we ourselves are not actually doing the baptizing) and teaching them are our responsibility.  Jesus also gave us powerful examples of how to make disciples. He was friendly; he approached people.  He listened to them.  He didn’t demand they come to him, although he could have. He personified hospitality. The only people who feared him were the hypocrites, the despots and the unkind.

Last night, I witnessed a wonderful event, the confirmation of eight young adults who, for one reason or another, had not had the opportunity to receive the Sacrament of Confirmation. This evening came about because several wonderful people evangelized and catechized them with hospitality. The Rev. Bartholomew Daly, MHM (Mill Hill Missionary), administrator of Our Lady of Peace parish in Manhattan, offered the homelike atmosphere of his rectory for their preparation and the beautiful church, with all its Easter flowers, for the Eucharistic Liturgy during which they were confirmed. Oscar Cruz, director of adult faith formation under the leadership of Catechetical Office director, Sr. Joan Curtin, CND, prepared them, meeting with them in the evening for several weeks, when most other people had left work and gone home. Bishop Gerald Walsh, vicar general of the archdiocese, concelebrated with Father Daly and confirmed these young adults with great attention and care.   Nothing was careless or rushed. The atmosphere was deeply spiritual.

Afterwards, Fr. Daly invited the eight newly confirmed Catholics and their guests back to the rectory dining room for cookies and coffee. People lingered there, chatting and making plans to stay in touch. I kept thinking to myself, this is how ministry should be all the time, everywhere. And it could be, couldn’t it?

By the way, if you are a Catholic adult seeking Confirmation or you know someone who is, there will be another opportunity for preparation and reception of this sacrament. A Confirmation preparation class will begin on April 25 at Holy Family parish in New Rochelle.  Details are here.  Be sure to read the online brochure for what you need to provide, including permission from your pastor.

Art at the service of evangelization

Friday, October 19th, 2012

Often when we look at religious stained glass windows or mosaics, we have to crane our necks because they are above eye level.  We don’t always get to appreciate the fine work, the detail, and the precision that go into creating these pieces, many of which could be considered visual evangelization and catechesis.

This is a particular loss when it comes to the devotional art of Louis Comfort Tiffany (1948-1933) and his studio, which created devotional and other works for a fifty-year period that spanned what is often referred to as “the gilded age.”

While Tiffany worked in many media, his name is most associated with a unique style of stained glass. He and his team didn’t just use glass creatively. They created special glass that was streaky, opalescent and delicately tinted. These glass styles enabled the subjects of the windows to appear animated and filled with emotion. Backgrounds acquired dimension. Clothing looked so real that one wanted to reach out and touch the fabric. It’s not always easy to appreciate all this from ten feet below the window or across the nave of a church.

Now, the Museum of Biblical Art (MOBIA), which is located at the headquarters of the American Bible Society on 61 Street and Broadway in Manhattan, has provided a unique opportunity for us to see at eye level or close to it the genius of Tiffany devotional art. It’s an extraordinary collection.

There are stained glass windows from the Driehaus and Neudstadt collections, the Corning Museum of Glass, several churches, and many other sources. From St. Andrew’s Dune Church of Southampton, N.Y., there is a touching window from the legend of Arthur: young Galahad in pursuit of the Holy Grail. It is a memorial for an eighteen year-old boy.  A larger window is titled “Lydia Entertaining Christ and His Apostles.” However, MOBIA’s curators think Lydia is more likely entertaining Paul, Timothy and Silas. According to the Acts of the Apostles, she met the three of them at Philippi in Asia Minor (Acts 16:13-15.)

MOBIA’s exhibit also contains magnificent mosaics, including one named “Fathers of the Church,” featuring St. John Chrysostom, St. Augustine of Hippo and St. Ambrose. And there’s more, too much more to itemize here.

Tiffany’s devotional art was commissioned mostly by Protestant and Jewish congregations. However, some Catholic Churches in our own archdiocese have Tiffany windows and the altar of St. Michael and St. Louis in St. Patrick’s Cathedral is associated with Tiffany. Maybe your church has a Tiffany touch.

The exhibit is on through Jan. 20, 2013, and admission is free.  You can preview the exhibition, “Louis C. Tiffany and the Art of Devotion, here.  If you really want a treat, find out when MOBIA’s own experts are giving tours.

Fine religious art can evangelize and catechize. The medieval cathedral builders knew that and filled their churches with stained glass and sculpture. The Renaissance painters and sculptures knew it, too. Certainly Tiffany understood the power of great devotional art. It’s true today.  Modern church art may be different from that of earlier periods but if it is good, it can be a powerful tool of evangelization. How appropriate for a Year of Faith.

Evangelization apprentices

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011

A weekend in mid July. The perfect time for a getaway to the beach, the mountains or a sparkling lake, right? Well, not if you are one of  122 dedicated parishioners from around the archdiocese, who will spend this coming weekend in Poughkeepsie at  Holy Trinity Parish. Holy Trinity is hosting two days of training on a parish evangelization course called Discovering Christ. This is one of three courses designed by ChristLife, an apostolate in the Archdiocese of Baltimore. The other two courses are Following Christ and Sharing Christ.

The Archdiocesan Catechetical Office is sponsoring this as a facet of adult faith formation leadership training and 21 parishes are sending representatives.

At the end of the training, these representatives should have the tools they need to  evangelize their fellow Catholics, to enable them to better know or perhaps become reacquainted with Jesus Christ.

Discovering Christ consists of seven weekly sessions and a one-day retreat. Each session begins with a dinner, followed by prayer, presentation of the evening’s topic, and discussion. The topics include the meaning of life, why Jesus Christ matters, what Jesus wants us to know, why each of us need a Savior, why the Resurrection is so important, the Holy Spirit and the Spirit’s relation to us, becoming a Catholic disciple and, finally, why we all need the Church.

The process of Discovering Christ gives people a chance to see, grow in trust and respond to what they are experiencing in the session. The process is designed to engage not the just the mind but the heart as well.

Perhaps your parish is sending people for training. If so, look for Discovering Christ at your church in the near future.

For more information, visit the website, www.christlife.org