Posts Tagged ‘NY Archdiocesan Catechetical Office’

Honoring our finest

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

This coming Sunday, the Catechetical Office will certify as catechists more than 125 men and women from all over the 10 counties of the archdiocese. These persons are not paid. They volunteer their time to be trained in our live or online catechist formation programs, Level One and Two. They also spend hours each week, preparing for their classes and then handing on the faith to children in grade K-8, in the Rite of Christian Initiation, and in our pre-school process known as the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd. An additional 43 students from Msgr. Farrell and Moore Catholic High School will be certified.

Catechetical leaders (parish directors and coordinators of religious education, and of the RCIA) who have completed basic and advanced leadership training will be recognized. These processes can take a number of years to complete and many of these leaders give up evenings and weekends to complete their studies.

But that is just part of the ceremony. On this same day, we honor years of service. The Catechetical Medal of Honor will be presented to 18 certified catechists who have given at least 25 years to the catechetical ministry. Those who received the medal in years past and have continued to achieve ministry milestones will receive Papal blessings.

Finally, the Catechetical Office will present the Terence Cardinal Cooke Award for extraordinary commitment and leadership. This year’s honorees are Bishop Peter Byrne, episcopal vicar for Dutchess, Putnam and Northern Westchester; Rev. Bartholomew Daly, MHM, pastor of the Church of Our Lady of Peace, Manhattan; and Msgr. Thomas Leonard, pastor emeritus of the Church of the Holy Trinity, Manhattan. The John Cardinal O’Connor Award for outstanding ministry to persons with disabilities will go to Elizabeth Sullivan, coordinator of special religious education at St. Patrick’s, Highland Mills; and Maria Lamorgese, former coordinator of religious education at St. Francis Xavier in the Bronx. The Good Shepherd Award for those who work in or support the catechetical ministry in the spirit of the Good Shepherd will be given to two retiring parish leaders of religious education, Joanne Cunneen of St. Ignatius Loyola in Manhattan and Denise Enright of St. Teresa’s in Staten Island; to Ann Kearney, who served as an administrative assistant and financial consultant in the Archdiocesan Catechetical Office for many years; to Sr. Mary McCarthy, PBVM, pastoral associate at Sacred Heart, Newburgh; and to Geri Sciortino, owner of Bronx Design Company, who is responsible designing so many our programs, manuals and other resources.

The ceremony will take place in the chapel of the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers Building in Ossining, where so many missionaries have been trained and sent off to spread the Good News across the world. Msgr. Edward Weber, archdiocesan director of priest personnel, will preside.

Among them, these generous men and women devote more hours, days, weeks, months and years to the catechetical ministry than we could ever possibly calculate, all carrying out Jesus’ call to be “teaching all that I have commanded you.”

We are so proud of them. You should be, too.

Confirmation for Youth with Disabilities

Wednesday, January 9th, 2013

It has been nearly 35 years since the United States Catholic Bishops issued their guidelines for the reception of the sacraments by persons with physical or developmental disabilities.  But for some reason, many families still are not aware of them.  Too many Catholics with disabilities have not received sacraments beyond that of Baptism and sometimes First Eucharist.  The Sacrament of Confirmation is a more remote possibility, perhaps because it is frequently perceived as a sacrament of completion rather than what it actually is: a sacrament of initiation.

Here is what the bishops say about the sacraments and persons with disabilities:

“It is essential that all forms of the liturgy be completely accessible to persons with disabilities, since these forms are the essence of the spiritual tie that binds the Christian community together. To exclude members of the parish from these celebrations of the life of the Church, even by passive omission, is to deny the reality of that community. Accessibility involves far more than physical alterations to parish buildings. Realistic provision must be made for persons with disabilities to participate fully in the Eucharist and other liturgical celebrations such as the Sacraments of Reconciliation, Confirmation, and Anointing of the Sick (Pastoral Statement of U.S. Catholic Bishops on Persons with Disabilities, November 1978; revised 1989).”

Nearly 30 years ago, the late John Cardinal O’Connor, a tireless advocate for and friend to persons of all ages with disabilities, began a custom both his successors have continued: that of conferring the Sacrament of Confirmation upon youth with disabilities during his Sunday Pontifical Mass in St. Patrick’s Cathedral.  He was setting an example for all pastors and parishioners to welcome, prepare, and provide the sacraments to these young people in their parishes.  However, whether by design or by accident, he also established one of the most beloved and impressive rites on the Cathedral’s calendar.

This coming April 14, Timothy Michael Cardinal Dolan will confer the Sacrament of Confirmation to youth with disabilities at the 10:15 Mass in St. Patrick’s.  If you know of a Catholic young person with physical or cognitive disabilities, who has not yet been confirmed, please tell his or her parents, family members or caregivers to e-mail Mrs. Linda Sgammato, director of special religious education for the Archdiocesan Catechetical Office. Better yet, give her a call at 212-371-1011, ext.  2852. Mrs. Sgammato will be delighted to provide more details on having this young Catholic confirmed. She will be happy to meet the candidate and his/her family in their homes, too.

Says Mrs. Sgammato: “A home visit is an opportunity to meet the candidates and families in a relaxed, informal atmosphere, to hear their stories, to share their excitement, to present the red Confirmation gown and, of course, to learn how each candidate is prepared – by a catechist in a parish program adapted to his or her needs or by faith-filled parents, family members or caregivers. It’s my honor and joy to meet them and help make possible their great day of Confirmation at the Cathedral.”