Posts Tagged ‘St. Augustine of Hippo’

Trying to find some peace

Monday, May 11th, 2015

“Peace is a condition where there is no strife, no adversity. Are we in that state yet? Is there anyone who is not plagued with temptation? But suppose there is. They still have to fight daily against hunger and thirst. In this life hunger and thirst fight against us, bodily weariness fights against us, the lure of sleep fights against us, the burden of the body fights against us. We want to remain standing but are tired out and want to sit down. If we go on sitting for a long time, that too causes fatigue. What kind of internal peace can there be when we continue to face such resistance from vexations, cravings, wants and weariness? This is not a condition of perfect peace.”

Whenever I read this excerpt from a commentary on Psalm 84 by Bishop St. Augustine of Hippo, I am reminded of parish lay workers: catechists, catechetical leaders, other teachers, lectors, extraordinary ministers of Holy Communion, the parish councilors, the various parish committee members, the persons who keep the church looking beautiful, and more. They soldier on in a world that doesn’t always appreciate them or their devotion. Sometimes their fellow parishioners don’t appreciate them. Sometimes the pastor doesn’t either. Frequently, these good volunteers are struggling against exhaustion and frustration.

In May, I think especially of the parish religious education directors, coordinators and catechists, who annually prepare thousands of our archdiocesan children for First Eucharist. No one who is not in the catechetical ministry can truly grasp how much dedication, hard work and patience go into a beautiful, meaningful first reception of this sacrament. But you would never know how tired these laywomen and laymen are by the time First Eucharist Day arrives. They are all smiles.

The late Father Donald Burt, OSA, an Augustinian scholar from Villanova University, whose last years were spent soldiering on  in an exhausted body, offered some wisdom in his book, Day by Day with St. Augustine (Liturgical Press, 2006). Perfect peace, he pointed out, is not something we will find in this world, so there is no point in moaning about it. “The best peace we can achieve in this life,” Father Burt wrote, “is by enduring gracefully the trials of living in a body that is not always friendly or well-behaved.”

Or, as they say in England, “Keep calm and carry on.” I must go look to see if they got that from Augustine.

A new year’s prescription from the doctor

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014

This isn’t a flu cure but some sage advice from an ancient doctor of the church, whose words are as relevant now as they were 1,600 years ago. St. Augustine of Hippo lived in the North African breadbasket of the Roman Empire, just as the barbarians (at least that’s how the Romans regarded the invaders) were at the city gates and the empire itself was beginning to implode. Hippo-Regius, the city over which he presided as bishop, was a place in turmoil.

We in New York, especially those of us who live in the City of New York, find ourselves in troubled times. What can we do about this?

Augustine has the prescription and it still works. It might not be what we want take and it won’t be easy for some to stomach but it does address the issues and the voices that are tearing at the fabric of New York. Augustine calls us to accept responsibility, every single one of us, for helping to make New York the city we want it to be – a place for all people to live in peace.

From Augustine’s Sermon 30:

“The times are bad! The times are troublesome!’ This is what humans say. But we are our times. Let us live well and our times will be good. Such as we are, such are our times.”

A blessed and happier new year than the one we leave behind tonight.

Augustine on waging war and making peace

Monday, August 25th, 2014

I am on vacation but want to share some important information. With all the unrest and terror in the world these days, the writings of St. Augustine of Hippo on war and peace are being talked about with increasing urgency. The leaders of our church are making frequent reference to Augustine’s so-called just war theory. All of us, especially those who hand on the faith through the catechetical ministry, should be familiar with this.

The Rev. Donald X. Burt, OSA, PhD, emeritus professor of philosophy at Villanova University, spent most of his life examining, teaching and writing about Augustine. He died just a few months ago after a long and fruitful priesthood. Father Burt had the great gift of making Augustine accessible to people who were not students of this late fourth and early fifth century doctor of the church. During my 12 years at Villanova, I turned to him many times for aid in conveying Augustine’s philosophy to the university’s graduates, most of whom were not professional philosophers.

In his book, Friendship & Society, An Introduction to Augustine’s Practical Philosophy (Wm. P. Eerdmans Publishing Co., 1999), Father Burt devoted a chapter to Augustine’s very strong views on peace. Here it is, for your information, courtesy of Villanova University’s website. I am also linking you to Book 19 of Augustine’s City of God. Read chapter 7.

By the way, St. Augustine’s feast day is this Thursday, Aug, 28. Pray to him and to his mother Monica, whose feast is Aug. 27, to intercede on behalf of us all, especially political, military and religious leaders, to bring a just peace.

Augustine and his views about women

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

August 28 is the feast of one of Christianity’s greatest philosophers, St. Augustine of Hippo. However, these days he’s getting a bit of bad rap, particularly when it comes to women. Granted, he did believe and write that women were subordinate and therefore should be obedient to men. But he was a product of his time and culture.  No one thought women were equal to men.

Augustine and his Christian contemporaries read the Bible, including the Book of Genesis, literally and as an historical document.  They did not know of evolution. They did not understand human biology as we of the 21st century do. As far as Augustine and every other Christian knew, the first woman was formed from the first man’s rib (Gen.2:21-23). Because she was formed from the male, she and all the women who followed her must be subordinate.

But let’s be fair here.  The man died in 430 AD, 1,583 years ago. To pick and choose quotations from Augustine’s huge body of work, pull them out of their historical context, including the scientific knowledge and scriptural interpretation of the time, and then use them to support or debunk a viewpoint of today is not fair. It’s also not good scholarship.

So what did Augustine really think of women? For help in answering this question, I turned to my good friend, Father Allan D. Fitzgerald, O.S.A., director of the Augustinian Institute at Villanova University in Pennsylvania. He has provided this excerpt from an article about Augustine and women by the late Tarcisius Van Bavel, O.S.A. (1923-2007), a highly respected modern scholar of Augustine. Van Bavel was the director of the Augustinian Historical Institute in Heverlee, Belgium, and was professor of Theology at the Catholic University of Leuven, also in Belgium.

I hope that you will take a few minutes to read this piece.  You might find a surprise or two in the last paragraph. And be sure to check out Villanova’s Augustinian Institute for more about the fascinating bishop of Hippo.

“From the study of Augustine’s texts, it appears undoubtedly that the man occupies the central place in social life. The woman is always compared to and measured by the man. We must admit that Augustine’s view is androcentric. Woman is the weaker sex, subordinate to the man and owing him obedience. In the question of subordination of women, Augustine is not only influenced by the social ideas of his time, but also — and perhaps more — by the Bible. He read the paradise story in a historical way: the first human beings lived in a perfect paradisial situation; only later they degraded because of sin. Augustine starts from an idealized picture of the first human couple, whereas we modern people expect human perfection to come only in the future. What he read as a story about the beginning, we read as a story about the end. Modern science tells us that human beings began on a very primitive level, and that they developed only slowly in a long process of evolution. For Augustine it was more or less the opposite. This implies considerable differences in view and evaluation. Augustine had to base himself on the science of his day, and could not know or realize how much the biblical narratives were socially and culturally conditioned, in general and in particular regarding the relationship between male and female. For this reason it was difficult for him to consider libido as something belonging originally to human nature. However, he was not completely mistaken in his observation of libido. Many psychologists, especially of the psychoanalytic school, would agree with him in seeing sexual libido as an ambiguous force. To consider libido simply as a good would be naive; it is also a source of evil. On this point Augustine was more realistic than Julian of Eclanum.

      We should not be blind for the positive aspects of Augustine’s view. More than once he breaks through traditional Christian opinions, opening new perspectives and instigating further evolution. It is a pity that some of his ideas have had no greater influence on posterity. Some of these positive elements of his thought are taken over from his predecessors; others are corrections of the opinions of his predecessors. The idea of the moral superiority of women is borrowed from the best of Christian tradition.  In the question of woman as the image of God, he corrects the opinion of several theologians who wrote before him. Woman is created in the image of God; she is the image of God by nature; and not only through Christ’s grace conferred in baptism. The same must be said regarding the presence of the female body and sex in the resurrected state of the human being. This had been denied by influential authors before him. An important point is further his protest against the discrimination of women by civil law. In doing so he assailed social injustice in his own day. He criticized vehemently and intrepidly this kind of discrimination. Augustine’s own and most important contribution to a change within the relationship between husband and wife is, according to me, his emphasis on love in married life, and even more his interpretation of the conjugal relationship as friendship. In the Christian tradition before him this was seldom or never done.”

Augustine’s View on Women, Augustiniana 39 (1989) 5-53.

Tolle lege! Tolle lege! Then come find out more about Scripture.

Thursday, May 26th, 2011

“Tolle lege! Tolle lege!” “Pick it up and read it. Pick it up and read it.” That’s what children’s voices said to St. Augustine of Hippo when he was in despair ’way back in the late fourth century. The “it” was the Bible. He took the advice, picked up the Sacred Scripture,  and started to read Romans 13, 13-14. It changed his life…and ours, too, for that matter. That’s because Augustine went on to become one of the most influential philosophers of Christianity and of western civilization.

As Father Anthony Ciorra, a great friend of the Archdiocesan Catechetical Office, reminded our staff the other day, this is good advice for all us. The Bible is not simply that book that we pull off the shelf to record family births, weddings and deaths. It’s not just a wedding or religious jubilee gift. It’s the living Word of God, emphasis on living.

Sacred Scripture is inspired by the Holy Spirit to speak to all generations until the end of time. You could read the same passage on three different days or three different years, and discover each time that your understanding of that passage and of yourself is deepening.

Pope Benedict XVI, an admirer and scholar of St. Augustine of Hippo, released a wonderful exhortation recently, one that reminds us of the importance of picking up and reading our copies of the Bible. It’s called Verbum Domini and you might enjoy reading it.

Then do yourself a favor. Discover the liveliness, influence and relevance of the Word of God by coming to the Second Annual New York Catholic Bible Summit on Saturday, June 25, here at the Catholic Center and sponsored by the Archdiocesan Catechetical Office, the American Bible Society and Fordham University. It’s your chance to meet, hear and talk with some of today’s best scholars, historians, artists and musicians – a host of experts who will make Scripture a livelier experience than you ever dreamed. There will be workshops in both English and Spanish. Keynoters are the Rev. Donald Senior, CP, who edited the New American Bible and who is now president of the Catholic Theological Union; and the Rev. Gabriel Naranjo, CM, Secretario General de la Confederación Latinoamericana y Caribeña de Religiosas/os (CLAR) Bogotá, Colombia.  Among the many experts is New York’s’ own  Msgr. Robert Stern, president of the Catholic Near East Welfare Association, who will speak about the Holy Land, ancient and modern. That’s a timely topic and will give added context to our reading of the Word of God.   Find out about the rest of our speakers and register today, so we can get you into the workshop of your choice. If you prefer registering by mail, you have that option, too.

Hope to see you there.