Meeting Saints on All Saints’ Day

Yesterday, I was moved during my visit to the emergency shelter at John Jay College which is helping so many affected by Hurricane Sandy. It was my privilege to be able to meet and talk with so many resilient and graceful men and women, including those being helped and those helping them!

 

Afterwards, I went over to Staten Island, which has been hit terribly hard by the storm. Please remember them in your prayers especially!

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the archbishop of New York, spent most of Thursday afternoon touring the devastation wrought by Hurricane Sandy on the East and South Shores of Staten Island. Read more here.

Finally, today is All Souls’ Day. For all of those who lost their lives during this storm and for all of our family members and loved ones who have died, we pray:

Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them. May the souls of the faithful departed, through the mercy of God, rest in peace. Amen.

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3 Responses to “Meeting Saints on All Saints’ Day”

  1. Nita Steck says:

    Dear Cardinal Dolan, Please continue to pray and lead us toward a better world. The election comes very soon – keep teaching the right direction to go. We miss seeing you here in St.Louis but remember the good old days in Shrewsbury!

  2. Susan Murray says:

    Cardinal Dolan
    Given the magnitude of the disaster and the extent of peoples’ needs, I urge you to make better use of Archdiocesan websites to communicate and mobilize the Archdiocese. I cannot believe it to be the case in actuality, but both the main home page of the Archdiocese and the Catholic Charities web sites give the appearance that the hurricane disaster relief effort is just not that important to the Church. Recognizing that it may well be true that Catholic Charities was fully engaged “from the getgo”, from the outside it certainly looks like the attitude is “we’ll get around to it when we feel like it”.

    I suggest that the relief effort should be given the highest billing on the Archdiocense home page, with the idea of making it very easy for folks to learn more and to sign up for what they think they can do, instead of being buried two levels down in your blog. Likewise, the Catholic Charities page (which took several days to even make mention of the hurricane) should more prominently feature its links to information about the relief effort and should take interested parties more directly to a point where they can commit to providing donations or volunteering; it is presently a rather circuitous route.

    There are untapped resources here in the “upper counties”. Many of us came through this horrible storm very much unscathed. Greater efforts should be made to communicate with and mobilize us.

    Thank you for considering my suggestions.

    Sincerely,

    Susan Murray

  3. John G. says:

    Your Eminence,

    Down through the ages when perils, natural or manmade, were approaching, the Church would conduct special services imploring God to spare His creatures from the impending evil. With the awful effects of Storm Sandy all along the eastern coast of our country and now a “Noreaster” approaching the same devastated populace, is it not time for you to conduct a special prayer service over the next three days asking God to calm the winds and spare His people any further harm and tragedy. Those were the days of old when great faith lived within the Church – the faith that prayer could move mountains – or calm the seas and the winds. Is it not time to bring back that Great Faith to our Church and our people – what better time than the “Year of Faith”.

    Please consider opening the Cathedral for special prayers asking God to spare us from this impending disaster. You might consider asking your brother Bishops all along the Eastern Coast to join the effort to beseech God’s mercy upon us.

    Respectfully, John G.