Posts Tagged ‘Cardinal Dolan’

Visiting With Immigrant Children

Sunday, August 3rd, 2014

Immigrant children coming into this country have been the subject of much attention, debate – and, fortunately, great compassion by many – especially our Catholic charitable agencies and parishes.  For the most part, they are young people, without their parents, who are arriving in this country seeking a refuge from poverty or gang violence.   I was privileged today to travel to Northern Westchester and celebrate Mass for a group of these young people, to meet with them, and learn a little more about their circumstances and see where they are temporarily staying until they can be reunited, most often with their family members.

Former Mayor Ed Koch once told me, “Two women welcomed the immigrants to New York: Lady Liberty and Mother Church.” And he was right.  I just returned from a brief trip to Ireland, and people there still talk gratefully of the welcome given to so many Irish refugees during the great famine of the 19th Century.  We are called upon again today to care for a new group of immigrants, only this time the immigrants are teenagers – or younger.

Caring for the downtrodden, the outcast, the stranger among us, is part of our call as Catholics, and we here in the Archdiocese of New York have been doing just that for more than 200 years.  Lincoln Hall, for instance, where I celebrated Mass this morning, began as a residential treatment center back in 1863 to care for orphans left destitute after the Civil War.  The Archdiocese of New York has a long and proud tradition of caring for newcomers to our country.

Now, together, we are facing another crisis, one of children fleeing violence and risking their lives with the hope of finding family and shelter here.  Pope Francis said it so well, late last month, when he reminded us that “this humanitarian emergency requires, as a first urgent measure, these children be welcomed and protected.”

And that is just what  Catholic Charities, parishes, professionals and volunteers throughout the country are doing.

At Lincoln Hall and in similar residences children  receive the temporary housing, education, health, and legal support they need to survive and begin to re-establish their lives.

Immigration is not a new “issue.”  I have been very much preoccupied with the vulnerability of our immigrants and refugees because I meet them everywhere I go throughout our archdiocese: men, women, and children so grateful to be in America, so searching to find a home here, so eager to work, settle down, and become part of a nation that has traditionally welcomed and embraced the immigrant.  I am grateful to those political leaders on both sides of the aisle, people like Senator Chuck Schumer and Representative Peter King,   who have led the fight for comprehensive immigration reform.  I am more than frustrated that too much partisan and self-interest politics up to this point has trumped the common good of our country.  But. I am not giving up hope, nor the struggle.  I continue to work and pray for the type of immigration reform our country needs to remain strong.

But these young people can’t wait for immigration reform.  As Pope Francis rightly points out, this is a humanitarian emergency, and however they got here, these young people must be cared for now.  Politicians and pundits might argue about how best to handle this humanitarian crisis.  For us, the answer is simple thanks to guidance Jesus gave us more than 2,000 years ago:

“Whoever welcomes a little child like this in my name welcomes me.”

Marriage: A Mirror of the Love Found in the Most Blessed Trinity

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014
Over the weekend, I had the joy of welcoming hundreds of our married couples celebrating their fiftieth wedding anniversaries, and the cathedral was packed for two Masses with the couples, their children, and grandkids.

After letting them know of our love, gratitude, and congratulations, I commented how appropriate it was that our archdiocesan celebration of their golden jubilee was taking place on Trinity Sunday.

I could see they were a bit bewildered at first.  What in the world does the Blessed Trinity have to do with our marriage, they rightfully wondered.

Well . . . everything!  I hope they now agree.

Think about it:

For one, the Most Blessed Trinity is the origin and the goal of all reality.  Creation, the world, and the human person did not come from chance, from a “black hole,” or a “big bang,”  No, it all began with God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit, one God, three persons, an infinite, eternal Trinity of love and life.  As the ancient philosophers tell us, “good expands.”  The infinite, life, love and goodness of the Trinity, generated creation and us, creatures.  The Trinity is our start.

And, the Trinity is our destiny, as all creation and all creatures are making their way back to the Triune God.

Those married couples had their start in goodness and love – – in God – – and are on a journey, together, returning to the everlasting embrace of Father, Son, and Spirit.  The faithful love, half-a-century vintage, of those anniversary couples, began in the sparkle of the Trinity’s eye, and will conclude with the God who initiated it.

Two, the life of the Blessed Trinity is not “way out there,” but deep down in here, in our heart!  Yes, the good news is that the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit live within us!  Jesus told us so!  We call this awesome gift grace.  The life of the Trinity dwells in the soul of the believer, to save us, help us, lead us, inspire us.

On their wedding day, these couples received a unique grace, a “booster shot” of the indwelling of the Trinity, as God promised to support them in the ups-and-downs of marriage.  These couples agree!  God kept His promise!  That grace, that life of the Blessed Trinity down deep in their heart, got them through!

Three, that Blessed Trinity is not some inert, dry doctrine.  It is a communion of life and love, a unity of three Divine Persons.  That’s what God intends for us all:  not to exist as isolated, self-centered individuals, but to thrive as members of a community!

This community intended by God can be found in friendships, human solidarity, the Church, our families.  It is radiantly evident in marriage, as a man and woman, two individuals, become one!  The “I” becomes “we,” the “mine” becomes “ours.”

And the love of this union of a man and woman brings new life, as all the children and grandchildren of our anniversary couples can attest!

There it is:  the love of a man and woman in marriage is a reflection, a metaphor, a mirror of the love found in the Most Blessed Trinity!

That’s why we believe a marriage is forever, faithful, and fruitful . . . because the love of Father, Son, and Spirit is that way!

Married couples:  thank you for reminding us of The Blessed Trinity!

Pastoral Planning Since Pentecost

Tuesday, May 6th, 2014

The readings from God’s Holy Word in the Bible during this bright Easter season are most enlightening and encouraging.

A facet I enjoy a lot, especially evident in our selections at Mass, and in the Divine Office we clergy and religious daily pray, is the narrative, particularly in the Acts of the Apostles and the Epistles of Paul, Peter, James, and John, about the growth and structuring of the infant Church.

So, the apostles, disciples, and faithful women and men had to pray for guidance, then debate, and finally make tough decisions about such things as preaching the Gospel outside of Jerusalem (Who would go? Where? What language?); taking care of the “widows and orphans” (thus the development of deacons); the flow of the liturgy and other sacraments; attracting new converts and preserving the faith of those already in the fold; how to relate to pressing cultural and social issues, bringing the light of the gospel to the public square; and, how best to spend the offerings of God’s People.

One legitimately asks: hasn’t the Church been into strategic pastoral planning since Jesus ascended to His heavenly Father?

It’s hardly novel.  Our current Making All Things New is only the 2014 chapter of an opus which began to be composed in 33 a.d.

That’s why we’ve stressed from the start of our present round of planning that it’s more than a question about buildings, addresses, closings or merging.  Yes, some of this will be called for, and the sound recommendations from our pastors, clergy, religious, and people are now “on the table,” to be further prayed over, refined, and finalized.

But, driving all of this is the same set of values we sense in our Easter readings: is the invitation of Jesus, and the truth of His message, being extended effectively in our preaching, religious education of the young, faith formation of adults, and our schools? Are the poor and rich being served?  Are the “fallen away” being welcomed back?  Do God’s people have available to them the spiritual sustenance of prayer and the sacraments? Are the offerings of God’s People being spent well, or squandered?

Some are tempted to observe (and the press readily reports it!) that this strategic pastoral planning is all the result of a new, unprecedented crisis in today’s Church, caused by such things as mismanagement and stupidity by bishops and priests; the stubbornness of the Church to change settled teaching (woman’s ordination) or discipline (priestly celibacy) to correct the shortage of vocations; the loss of money paid to victims and attorneys due to the sex abuse nausea; or the mistakes of past bishops and pastors in overbuilding and over-expansion.

Baloney!  There’s not much radical, dramatic, or crisis driven in sound, patient, prayerful pastoral planning.  It’s been going on since Pentecost.

Thanks to all of you leading and cooperating in this current phase!  It’s not easy, but it’s sure essential.  And you’re in good company with the apostles and first generation disciples.

Revive Our Catholic Schools

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

Here is a great piece on Catholic education from the New York Daily News by Peter Meyer:

Church officials and educators have not given up, and there are numerous initiatives that have been launched in the last 20 years meant to staunch the hemorrhaging. The church’s extensive network of religious orders have picked up some of the educational slack, expanding their networks of schools, especially for the poor…

These are promising initiatives, but in this Holy Season, Catholics should consider their history, especially those times in the late 19th and early 20th centuries when they were not the dominant American religion, but an outcast group. And it was in 1884, at a Baltimore enclave of Bishops, that church leaders ordered every Catholic parish to create a Catholic school and all Catholic parents to send their children to them, creating one of the most successful grassroots church revivals in history.

Read the rest here.

Rebuild My Church

Monday, October 14th, 2013

Good morning!  Buon Giorno!  Happy Columbus Day!

Welcome to this ritual of blessing our newly repaired and restored doors here at our city’s, our nation’s, spiritual gem, America’s parish church, our beloved Saint Patrick’s Cathedral.

Cardinal Egan, my brother bishops, Monsignor Ritchie, the rector of this Cathedral, my brother priests, join me in welcoming all of you, inside and outside of this sacred temple, as do prominent board members, trustees, and allies:

Ken Langone

Anthony and Christie DiNicola

Daniele Bodini

Sam and Melody DiPiazza

Patricia Dillon

Alice Sim

John Studzinski

Stephanie Whittier

Vicky McLoughlin

Judge Milton Williams

And so many more….

These leaders join me in saying Benvenuti  this splendid autumn morning,  Columbus Day.

You know what Jesus said to the patron saint of Italy, St. Francis of Assisi, from the crucifix at the crumbling church of San Damiano: Rebuild my church!

We have heard Jesus say the same to us, Rebuild my church, as a year-and-a-half ago, on Saint Patrick’s Day, we began the repair, restoration, and renewal of this historic soul of New York City.

Thanks to generous benefactors.

Thanks to our artisans –

Jim and Colleen Donaghy

Andy Bast

Rolando Kraeher

Jeff Murphy

And, thanks especially to God’s grace, the repair, restoration, and rebuilding progresses.

How fitting that we’d halt to bless these restored doors:

Through them have passed saints and future saints:

St. Francis Xavier Cabrini, the patron saint of immigrants

The body of Venerable Pierre Toussaint

Venerable Dorothy Day

Venerable Terence Cooke

Venerable Fulton Sheen

Through these doors have passed future Pope Pius XII, Pope Paul VI, Pope John Paul II (twice!), Pope Benedict XVI.

Through these doors have passed immigrants and their children from Italy and from all over the world, who, with tears in their eyes from leaving their homes behind, had a smile on their face as they realized that, at St. Pat’s, they had a spiritual home.

Through these doors came not only saints, popes, immigrants…but sinners, people searching, seeking, and struggling, like you and me, who, once through these doors, know that our Heavenly Father embraces them.

Members of the Columbus Citizen’s Foundation Board:

President and Mrs. Fusaro

Maria Bartiromo

Grand Marshal and Mrs. Perella

Mr. and Mrs. Mattone

Ms. Pardo

Mr. and Mrs. Trennert

Mr. and Mrs. Freda

Louis Tallarini

Mary Young

And Consul General Natalia Quintavalle

Thank you for so graciously representing the millions of immigrants from beloved Italy, and from all over the world, who, like Christopher Columbus, dared to dream, hope, and discover, trusting in God, bringing their faith to a new land.

Thank you to all who support us as we “rebuild His church.” 

I invite you all to continue to support our humble attempt to answer the request Jesus gave Saint Francis, Rebuild my church!

Let us pray:

Open wide the doors to God’s mercy.

Jesus says, “Here I stand knocking at the door!”

Lord, you are a God who opens doors,  not closes them.

You are a God who opened to us the doors to life, and who longs to open for us the doors to heaven.

You are the God who desires that all pass through the doors into your household of faith…

Bless these restored doors, through the intercession of Mary, your mother, and the saints who adorn them – Saint Joseph, Saint Isaac Jogues, the North American Martyrs, Saint Kateri Tekakwitha, Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, Saint Francis Xavier Cabrini, Saint Patrick – so that all who enter them may be refreshed by your love, grace, and mercy,

In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit…Amen!

 

Updates from Rome

Monday, March 4th, 2013

Greetings from Rome! I invite you to listen to daily papal election updates from Rome on the Catholic Channel of SiriusXM. You can listen to them online, click here.