Posts Tagged ‘New York Post’

The Gift of Catholic Schools

Monday, May 19th, 2014

In Sunday’s New York Post, Naomi Schaefer Riley had an excellent article on the value of Catholic schools, and why we must work to save them!  She shares a wonderful story of a student, Jason Tejada, who attended Incarnation School  in Washington Heights and All Hallows High School in the Bronx, and went on to Columbia University, and is now working at JPMorgan.

The details of Jason’s story may be particularly poignant, but the success that Catholic schools can bring underprivileged students is widely understood.

The achievement, graduation rates and college completion rates are much higher for students who attend Catholic school than public school, even controlling for family income. A recent Brookings/Harvard study found that African American students in New York who won and used a scholarship to attend private school starting in kindergarten were 24% more likely to attend college than those who applied but didn’t win a scholarship.

You can read the entire article here.

Bigotry and Catholic Education

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

My thanks to Seth Lipsky at the New York Post for his insightful article, Time to end NY’s anti-Catholic bigotry:

The proposed credit is tiny compared to the estimated $22 billion for pre-k through grade 12 in the state’s education budget. It would start at $180 million in the first year and then $225 million and $300 million. However modest in comparative cost, it would be a help, particularly to families of limited means with pupils in religious day schools…

Our credit is shaken, but not by the priests, rabbis and imams. The poor laborer is strangled by public employees who have a better deal than he could ever get — and a quarter of a trillion dollars in unfunded state pension obligations. Isn’t it time to make it easier for religious schools to help educate our children?

Read the rest here.

NYPost: Meet the new pope — same as the old pope

Friday, January 31st, 2014

Another good article from the New York Post. Kyle Smith reflects on coverage of the Church:

It’s hard for liberals (and maybe some conservatives) to wrap their heads around this, but Catholic doctrine doesn’t line up neatly with American views of left and right. The church is steadfastly pro-life on abortion (we associate that with conservatives) but equally pro-life on capital punishment (a view we call liberal). Nor has the Vatican altered its commitment to uplifting the poor or its related suspicion of capitalism.

Read the rest here.

NY Post: “Catholic schools’ secret: love”

Friday, January 31st, 2014

Here is a wonderful piece on our Catholic schools–during Catholic Schools Week–in the New York Post by Bill McGurn:

We don’t speak much about love in education, not even during Catholic Schools Week. Instead, we focus on more tangible measures of success: how 99 percent of Catholic school students get their high-school diplomas; how a black or Latino child is 2.5 times more likely to graduate from college if he or she has attended a Catholic high school; how Catholic schools manage to do all this at a fraction of the cost of public schools…

Back when he was playing for the New York Jets, Damien Woody sent his children to St. Vincent’s even though his family wasn’t Catholic. At a Christmas concert, a fellow parent asked him why. He answered, “My wife and I believe that a school where they love God will love my children.”

Read the rest here.

Greetings from San Diego

Tuesday, June 11th, 2013

Greetings from San Diego, where I have joined with my brother bishops from across the country for our annual Spring meeting. I spent last evening catching up on the news from back home, and came across a few items I’d like to share.

Yesterday, the online edition of USA Today ran an op-ed column from me, as president of the USCCB, expressing our support for the immigration reform bill now before the U.S. Senate. Let me share an excerpt with you:

Immigration reform is an issue close to Catholic hearts. America has wonderfully welcomed generations of immigrant families, and our parishes, schools and charitable ministries have long helped successfully integrate immigrants into American life.

Congress will soon debate the most comprehensive overhaul of our nation’s immigration laws in almost 30 years. With the stakes so high, it’s important that Congress craft legislation that balances the legitimate needs of security with our heritage of welcoming immigrants and the gifts they bring to our country.

You can read the whole column here.

This past weekend, I asked that a letter be shared in the parishes of the Archdiocese of New York on two very important issues: immigration reform, and, here in New York, the provision in the Women’s Equality Act that would expand abortion.

There were also two well-written pieces on the Women’s Equality Act. The first opinion piece was written by Greg Pfundstein in the New York Post. Pfundstein examines the problems with the abortion provision of the bill. Here is an excerpt from his op-ed:

Gov. Cuomo is trying to sell New Yorkers a bill of goods about his abortion legislation — claiming it would just codify federal law. That’s a lie.

The governor and his allies say the bill would merely align state law with Roe v Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision.

Yet Roe — which effectively constitutionalized abortion on demand up until birth — is no longer the governing federal case on abortion. In 1992, Casey v. Planned Parenthood substantially altered the landscape by explicitly allowing states to impose some sensible restrictions on abortion.

Click here to read his whole op-ed.

The second piece that I came across is an editorial published in the New York Daily News questioning Governor Cuomo’s decision to promote this abortion expansion bill at this time. Here is an excerpt:

The governor triggered the fight by proposing a bill that, he says, is intended only to clarify a woman’s legal right to terminate a pregnancy in New York. But in so doing, he is addressing an issue that has long been settled in both law and practice.

This state can rightly be called the abortion capital of America, thanks to the city’s extraordinarily high rate of pregnancy terminations.

Women in the city have abortions at a rate more than three times that of the U.S. as a whole, while women in the rest of the state surpass the national average by a small margin.

You can read the editorial here.

The New York Post Celebrates Catholic Schools

Monday, January 28th, 2013

As we begin National Catholic Schools Week, I’d like to share with you a wonderful editorial published by the New York Post today on our beloved Catholic schools.

In short, the Big Apple’s Catholic schools are doing the job so many public schools are failing to do, and doing it at a much lower cost. Here’s just one comparison: The average cost per pupil for an elementary student in a Catholic school is $6,800 per year. By contrast, taxpayers pay $6,900 just to bus a kid to public school.

Plainly, the 105,398 students in our Catholic schools (about 10 percent of the public-school population) benefit mightily from the education they receive. This, after all, is a system that boasts two alums on the Supreme Court: Justices Antonin Scalia (Xavier Prep in Manhattan) and Sonia Sotomayor (Blessed Sacrament and Cardinal Spellman in The Bronx).

The Catholic schools are also a bargain for New York taxpayers. Multiply those 105,000 students by the city’s average spending per pupil, and the savings easily hit $2 billion a year.

Read the rest here.

Thanksgiving: Prayer of Petition

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

This morning, the New York Post published my op-ed about my special prayer for Thanksgiving. I would like to share it with you.

Here is an excerpt:

I praise God for the radiant virtue so evident in our community since the wreckage of the hurricane. You will pardon me, I hope, and I trust that you’ll understand, if I say that I am especially proud of our Catholic family’s generous outreach, although I rejoice in the ecumenical extent of the area’s compassion.

While Thursday will find many of our neighbors still without homes and provisions, I trust they can at least whisper a prayer of praise for the essentials of life that no wind or wave can wipe out — love, faith, hope, life itself, family, friends, a future and a community that has let them know they are not alone.

Let me glorify God as well for the gift of our country. No matter if your issues, party or candidates won or lost two weeks ago: How singularly blessed we are as citizens of a country that is governed from, by and for the people. Almost weekly do we read or hear of nations where elections — if they even have them — are occasions of mobs, armies, violence, tear gas and near-anarchy. Not here . . . thank God!

You can read the whole op-ed here.

May you have a blessed Thanksgiving!