Posts Tagged ‘Pope Francis’

Statement on Pope Francis as Time “Person of the Year”

Wednesday, December 11th, 2013

This morning I was delighted to learn that His Holiness, Pope Francis was named Time magazine’s “Person of the Year.”  Let me share with you my statement that I released to the press:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: December 11, 2013

STATEMENT OF CARDINAL TIMOTHY DOLAN ON POPE FRANCIS AS TIME “PERSON OF THE YEAR”
The election of Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio as the successor of Saint Peter seemed to surprise many who had not yet heard of the Archbishop of Buenos Aires. While he may have been unknown at the time, since he first appeared on the balcony of Saint Peter’s Basilica on that chilly, wet evening of March 13, Pope Francis has captivated the world, as he preaches the Gospel and shares its messages of the love and mercy of God, our responsibility to care for our sisters and brothers in need, and the ever present invitation of Jesus and His Church to “come and see.” Just like Blessed Pope John Paul II was in 1995, Pope Francis has been named Time’s “Person of the Year” for presenting the Church’s timeless truths to today’s world. In all that he does, through his humble ways and simple lifestyle, Pope Francis clearly radiates the joy that comes from loving God and caring for his people. There could be no finer choice for “Person of the Year.”

The Good Old Days

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013

A string of good popes!

In recent memory, all of the occupants of the Chair of St. Peter have been virtuous, good, even saintly men.

Only the naïve will consider that statement a “no-brainer.” Why? Because this has not always been the case.

We have had more than one bad pope! There are books written on them! We have had drunks, philanderers, tyrannical, bloodthirsty rogues whose exploits would make a truck driver blush.

Come to think about it, the first one, St. Peter, was no gem, as he denied even knowing Jesus, three times, at the very moment the Lord could most have used a loyal friend.

No wonder, one of the best histories of the papacy around is entitled Saints and Sinners, since we’ve had our share of both. And, no surprise, the word “Borgia,” the name of a family that gave us more than one medieval pope, connotes corruption and immorality.

What’s remarkable, of course, is not that there have been knavish, scandalous popes — there sure have been! — but that the Church keeps on going in spite of them.

No surprise there, if you trust the promise Jesus made that “I will be with my Church all days, even until the end of the world.”

In our time, though, the successors of St. Peter have been men of sanctity and honor, real luminaries for the Church and the world.

I’m just thinking of the pontiffs I’ve known:

Pius XII, who died when I was eight, was a man of piety, asceticism, diplomatic skills, and theological erudition. I remember my third grade teacher commenting, as we dropped to our knees to pray the rosary upon hearing of his death in 1958, “We’re all spiritual orphans now, and I don’t know who could ever take his place after his nineteen years as our Holy Father!”

The Holy Spirit was not as worried, and we got Blessed John XXIII. When he died in 1963, my hometown newspaper had an editorial cartoon showing the globe, with the face of a man, crying.

Then came Paul VI, who led the Church courageously and wisely through the final years of the council, and the decade of its implementation keeping us from “throwing the baby out with the bathwater.”

We can hardly remember the brief thirty-three days of Pope John Paul I in September, 1978, except that he captivated us with his warmth, smile, and sincerity.

But we sure recall with awe and devotion the twenty-seven years soon-to-be-Saint John Paul II filled the “shoes of the fisherman.” It was no hyperbole when shouts of Santo Subito (“a Saint now!”) filled the square at his funeral, or that God’s people began to refer to him as John Paul the Great. And today’s his feast day.

His successor, Pope Benedict XVI, was just what we needed after Pope John Paul II, and challenged us with insightful teaching worthy of the vicar of Christ. We’re still in awe of his act of humility in resigning the office of Peter lest the Church suffer from a fragile pontiff.

And now? Viva il Papa! The world has fallen in love with Pope Francis, who has already been hailed as “the world’s parish priest.” If I had a dollar for every New Yorker, Catholic and not, who has told me how much he or she loves our current Holy Father, I’d pay off the big repair bill of St. Patrick’s Cathedral!

So, face it: we’ve had quite a few popes throughout our 2,000 year run that have been real lemons, hardly worthy of the high dignity of the office. Thank God Jesus is in charge!

But, in our memories today, we’ve had great, holy, and good popes. These are “the good old days” for us as Catholics.

Rebuild My Church

Monday, October 14th, 2013

Good morning!  Buon Giorno!  Happy Columbus Day!

Welcome to this ritual of blessing our newly repaired and restored doors here at our city’s, our nation’s, spiritual gem, America’s parish church, our beloved Saint Patrick’s Cathedral.

Cardinal Egan, my brother bishops, Monsignor Ritchie, the rector of this Cathedral, my brother priests, join me in welcoming all of you, inside and outside of this sacred temple, as do prominent board members, trustees, and allies:

Ken Langone

Anthony and Christie DiNicola

Daniele Bodini

Sam and Melody DiPiazza

Patricia Dillon

Alice Sim

John Studzinski

Stephanie Whittier

Vicky McLoughlin

Judge Milton Williams

And so many more….

These leaders join me in saying Benvenuti  this splendid autumn morning,  Columbus Day.

You know what Jesus said to the patron saint of Italy, St. Francis of Assisi, from the crucifix at the crumbling church of San Damiano: Rebuild my church!

We have heard Jesus say the same to us, Rebuild my church, as a year-and-a-half ago, on Saint Patrick’s Day, we began the repair, restoration, and renewal of this historic soul of New York City.

Thanks to generous benefactors.

Thanks to our artisans –

Jim and Colleen Donaghy

Andy Bast

Rolando Kraeher

Jeff Murphy

And, thanks especially to God’s grace, the repair, restoration, and rebuilding progresses.

How fitting that we’d halt to bless these restored doors:

Through them have passed saints and future saints:

St. Francis Xavier Cabrini, the patron saint of immigrants

The body of Venerable Pierre Toussaint

Venerable Dorothy Day

Venerable Terence Cooke

Venerable Fulton Sheen

Through these doors have passed future Pope Pius XII, Pope Paul VI, Pope John Paul II (twice!), Pope Benedict XVI.

Through these doors have passed immigrants and their children from Italy and from all over the world, who, with tears in their eyes from leaving their homes behind, had a smile on their face as they realized that, at St. Pat’s, they had a spiritual home.

Through these doors came not only saints, popes, immigrants…but sinners, people searching, seeking, and struggling, like you and me, who, once through these doors, know that our Heavenly Father embraces them.

Members of the Columbus Citizen’s Foundation Board:

President and Mrs. Fusaro

Maria Bartiromo

Grand Marshal and Mrs. Perella

Mr. and Mrs. Mattone

Ms. Pardo

Mr. and Mrs. Trennert

Mr. and Mrs. Freda

Louis Tallarini

Mary Young

And Consul General Natalia Quintavalle

Thank you for so graciously representing the millions of immigrants from beloved Italy, and from all over the world, who, like Christopher Columbus, dared to dream, hope, and discover, trusting in God, bringing their faith to a new land.

Thank you to all who support us as we “rebuild His church.” 

I invite you all to continue to support our humble attempt to answer the request Jesus gave Saint Francis, Rebuild my church!

Let us pray:

Open wide the doors to God’s mercy.

Jesus says, “Here I stand knocking at the door!”

Lord, you are a God who opens doors,  not closes them.

You are a God who opened to us the doors to life, and who longs to open for us the doors to heaven.

You are the God who desires that all pass through the doors into your household of faith…

Bless these restored doors, through the intercession of Mary, your mother, and the saints who adorn them – Saint Joseph, Saint Isaac Jogues, the North American Martyrs, Saint Kateri Tekakwitha, Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, Saint Francis Xavier Cabrini, Saint Patrick – so that all who enter them may be refreshed by your love, grace, and mercy,

In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit…Amen!

 

Analysis on Pope Francis’ Vision

Monday, September 23rd, 2013

Let me share with you one of the best analysis of Pope Francis that I have read recently. This op-ed, written by Michael Coren, was published in yesterday’s New York Daily News. Just in case you missed it, here is an excerpt:

What Francis has urged, though, is a new painting. Black and white is vital, but the true picture can only be understood through a whole variety of colors. So this is a Pope of nuance and backstory, of delicacy and empathy of delivery. Truth needs to be sung rather than shouted, and he is telling the world — and particularly those who have left the Church and those who hide behind its rules instead of being liberated by them — that while we cannot compromise on truth, we must not compromise on love.

On the gay issue, for example, we are all so much more than our sexuality, and are all supremely and superbly loved by God who is our creator. Marriage is absolute, but to dislike or even hate someone because they are gay is not only wrong, it is anti-Catholic.

Francis is clearly explaining that no gay person will give any attention to a Church that appears to close doors rather than greet newcomers. They may reject the message, but at least encourage them to hear it.

That is the papal message, and while the details are indeed difficult, the overall plot is simple and clear.

You can read the whole op-ed here.

Revitalizing the Church

Friday, September 13th, 2013

I recently came across this article, 10 ways to revitalize the Catholic Church, written by Fr.  I. Michael Bellafiore.

Here’s an excerpt:

“The new pope’s agenda is simple: spread the good news of Jesus Christ in a freer and more convincing way. Christ stated the church’s mission very plainly: “Go out and make disciples of all the nations.”…The church is not a spiritual McDonald’s whose success largely depends on its managers, the clergy. Paraphrasing President John Kennedy’s call to service, “Ask not what the church can do for you, but what you can do for the church.” Evangelicals and Pentecostals have much to teach Catholics in this regard. Polls show Catholics stayed away from church because they were ignored, slighted, or scandalized. Sometimes they misunderstand church teaching.  They need to know that they are missed and that the door is open for them…

Remember that being Catholic in America, or anywhere, means we can rejoice and trust Christ’s admonishment, “be not afraid.”

You can read the whole article here.

Statement of the USCCB on Pursuing Political Solution in Syria

Thursday, September 5th, 2013

I would like to share with you the following press release that was issued today by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops on pursuing a peaceful political solution in Syria instead of a military intervention.

CARDINAL DOLAN, BISHOP PATES URGE CONGRESS TO PURSUE POLITICAL SOLUTION IN SYRIA, NOT MILITARY OPTION

Bishops make appeal same day Pope Francis urges G20 nations to pursue peace
Affirm Congressional finding that only negotiated political settlement will work
Assure Congress of their prayers

WASHINGTON—On the same day that Pope Francis asked the G20 nations to “lay aside the futile pursuit of a military solution” in Syria, Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), and Bishop Richard E. Pates of Des Moines, Iowa, chairman of the USCCB Committee on International Justice and Peace, wrote to every member of Congress, urging them not to resort to military intervention, but instead work to end the violence in Syria through a political solution.

In their September 5 letter, Cardinal Dolan and Bishop Pates affirmed the finding of a proposed Congressional resolution that acknowledges that “the conflict in Syria will only be resolved through a negotiated political settlement,” and questioned military intervention. The bishops also condemned the use of chemical weapons in Syria, declaring these “indiscriminate weapons have no place in the arsenals of the family of nations.” They noted that more than 100,000 Syrians have lost their lives, more than 2 million have fled the country as refugees, and more than 4 million within Syria have been driven from their homes by the ongoing conflict.

“Our focus is on the humanitarian catastrophe unfolding in Syria and on saving lives by ending the conflict, not fueling it,” the bishops wrote. They echoed the appeals of Pope Francis and bishops in the Middle East who “have made it clear that a military attack will be counterproductive, will exacerbate an already deadly situation, and will have unintended negative consequences.”

“We ask the United States to work urgently and tirelessly with other governments to obtain a ceasefire, initiate serious negotiations, provide impartial humanitarian assistance, and encourage efforts to build an inclusive society in Syria that protects the rights of all its citizens, including Christians and other minorities,” they wrote. The bishops also assured Congress of their prayers in the midst of this complex situation.

Cardinal Dolan and Bishop Pates wrote to President Obama September 4, also urging a political solution in Syria.

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God Bless and Guide Us

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

A lot going on as we get back to routine after what I trust was a good summer, as we re-open school and so many parish programs, and as we wish our Jewish neighbors the happiest of their holy days.

Three things I especially wanted to mention to you:

For one, we’re all worried about the perilous situation in Syria and the entire tortured region of the Middle East.

You may have heard that on Sunday, at his noon Angelus address and blessing to the tens-of-thousands gathered in St. Peter’s Square, Pope Francis firmly and soundly condemned the use of gas and chemical warfare, recently and brutally unleashed in Syria, but also cautioned against any escalation in force or weaponry that would only exacerbate the already volatile situation.

When we believers are frustrated, impatient, and “don’t know what to do,” – - and we are “all of the above” when it comes to the continued turmoil in the ancient lands of the Mideast – - we pray.  That’s what the Holy Father has asked us all to do this weekend.

Our prayers are with our President and Congress as they consider the appropriate American response.  Lord knows, as the world’s major power, we do indeed have a duty to remind the nations, cogently if necessary, that certain lines of civil and inhumane behavior cannot be tolerated in the community of nations.

Of the many sane and compelling voices heard on this horror, you will not be surprised that I pay special attention to those of religious leaders, particularly the weary and anxious, yet brave pleas of the tiny, persecuted, bloodied, threatened, venerable Christian communities in Syria, Lebanon, and Egypt.  They are there, right in the midst of it, poisoned by the gas, singed by the flames, shredded by the bombs, wounded by the guns.  Just what to do they humbly admit they do not exactly know; but they sure are united on what not to do:  please, they beg, no more bombs, no more arms, no more invasions, no more violent reaction.  They deserve to be heard!

The Holy See’s ambassador to the United Nations, Archbishop Francis Chullikatt, will offer the 5:30 p.m. Mass Saturday evening at the cathedral for this intention.  In response to the request of Pope Francis, I wish all our Catholic people to abstain from meat this Friday, and  add this intention to their prayers at Sunday Mass.

Two, while we will indeed heed the Holy Father’s invitation to keep this Sabbath as a World Day of Prayer  for peace in the Middle East, we’ll also keep our plans to pray as well for fair and comprehensive immigration reform.   Our senate has already passed a good bill.  Perfect?  No.  A lot better than what we now have?  Yes!  And now we ask the Lord – - who has told us in the Bible that He has a soft spot in His heart for the immigrant and refugee – - to illuminate the House of Representatives so they can bring home the reform this autumn.

Three, we prepare for our vote in the mayoral primary next Tuesday.  We thank God for the generous spirit of our candidates in answering the call to public service, and we study the pressing issues so we can make an informed and enlightened vote.

Traditionally, we Americans consider not only issues, but character  when we vote.  While we hardly expect our candidates to be angels – - Lord knows none of us are! – - we do want them to be men and women of honor, integrity, principle, and, yes, virtue.

We Americans follow the political philosophy of thinkers such as Aristotle and Plato, mirrored in our own historically revered public servants, that politics is a noble vocation, that those who aspire to office can be expected to set a good example, to keep their word, their promises, their vows and oaths, and comport themselves with decency and propriety.  Yes, they do fail – - as do we religious leaders on occasion, I’m afraid – - but we still keep trying.

Recently, a mom asked “Who can our kids look up to?  Hollywood, athletes, entertainers, business leaders, clergy, and politicians are no longer good examples we can hold up for our children.”

That’s worrisome, isn’t it?  Jesus told His followers – - that’s us! – - that “I expect more out of you.”  Our guide is not what’s chic, pragmatic, “cool,” or popular, but what’s good, honorable, noble, decent, and virtuous.

The cynics claim “We deserve the leaders we get.”  Is it still possible to hope we get leaders whom we can hold up as examples for our children?

God bless and inspire our candidates!

God bless and guide us as we vote!       

What the Holy Father Said

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

Well, since everybody else is talking about it, I guess I should.

I’m speaking about, of course, the Holy Father’s remarks to the journalists on the plane returning from World Youth Days in Brazil.

Since I finally got to read the whole text of his conversation, it’s a good time to weigh in with a half-dozen or so of my own observations.

For one, the Pope was visibly “on a high” from his first international pastoral visit in Rio.  Understandably so.  Because I was there with him, I can verify that the superlatives being used — “oceanic” crowds, “frenzied” welcomes, “inspirational, heartfelt” words — are not exaggerations at all.

After the conclave, one of my brother cardinals predicted to me that, as Pope John Paul II “won back” the formerly communist controlled “Eastern bloc” countries, Pope Francis would revive the Church on his home continent of Latin America.  From what we saw in Brazil, he’s sure off to a great start.

In Rio, he was so positive, upbeat, forward looking, realistic, and challenging.  Look at his heartfelt pleas for “a Church that is poor and for the poor” as he visited hovels in the favela; his rejection of a “throwaway culture” that marginalizes elders, youth, babies, weak, handicapped, and refugees; his embrace of a “youthful, energetic faith,” with 3,000,000 young people giving the lie to the stereotype of a withered, listless, moribund Church; and his ringing chant that “lasting hope and joy comes from our faith in Jesus, from a God who enjoys surprising us.”

Two, mercy is the word that seems to summarize Francis’ talks:  both God’s tender mercy for us, and the mercy He wants us to have for one another.  I recalled his first Angelus in Rome after the white smoke, when he spoke of God’s lavish mercy, and his homily at his inaugural Mass on St. Joseph’s Day, when he asked us to be tender.

This mercy flows, not instead of or in spite of the Church, but through her!  This pastor reminds us that Jesus Christ and His Church are one.

Mercy, he claims, is not just for those who show-up.  No, says the world’s parish priest, “We shouldn’t just wait for the wounded to come to us; we go out and reach for them.”

Three, mercy was not just the theme of those radiant World Youth Days in Rio, but also of his now renowned hour-and-twenty minute comfortable conversation with the press on the plane.

So, his brief remarks on homosexuality were about mercy:  everyone has a welcome home in the Church; the Church considers unjust discrimination against any homosexual a sin;  and homosexual acts, which are contrary to Revelation — as are heterosexual acts outside of lifelong, life-giving, faithful marriage between one man and one woman — can always be healed by God’s mercy.  And when God’s mercy is sought, it is always given, the sin wiped away and forgotten; because of this, nobody — not the Pope, not a bishop, not a priest — can judge another!  Actions?  Yes; the heart? No.  No change in Church teaching here . . . or no intended “correction” to a more “dour” approach by his predecessors.  After all, it was under Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger that the Catechism was composed, which reminded us that people with same sex attraction were as much God’s children, deserving dignity and respect, as anybody else.

Four, his comments on the alleged “gay lobby” in the Vatican were perceptive.  What bothers him is any lobby.  There can be only one agenda in the Church:  that of Jesus Christ, His Gospel, His Church.  He even praised the favorite “whipping boy” of all of us — bishops included — the Curia, which is made up, he insisted, of a vast majority of selfless, generous, virtuous priests and people, with, okay, a few lemons.

Then, five, there’s his reaffirmation of the need for a “theology of women,” who hardly need a Roman collar to lead and serve in the Church.  After all, Pope Francis reminds us, Mary, the Mother of Jesus, “is the most important of all the apostles.”

A few final words.

One wonders if the Holy Father is frustrated by all this attention to his interview.  For six days he spoke powerfully about lofty issues such as friendship, service, trust, joy, hope, love for the poor, humility, discipleship, faith, and simplicity.  Those words got a bit of coverage.  The “hot button” issues such as women’s ordination, contraception, divorce and remarriage, abortion, homosexuality, or celibacy, as I noted in my blog Monday, did not seem of any concern to the three million youth, or to their beloved Pope Francis.

But, as usual, the press predictably brought these weary issues up, and have given them more ink than any of the other noble themes that rang through Copacabana Beach.  It’s not the Church that is obsessed with those topics, but the media!

And haunting all of the coverage is the hint that we now finally have a Pope who will change the Church’s ageless teaching.  Of course, Catholics know that the Pope, like all of us, is a servant of the truth of the Gospel, not a crafter.  Doctrine is a given; it is settled, inherited, faithfully passed on.  That’s his duty, and he’s sure doing it well.  As Gayle King commented during our interview on CBS This Morning yesterday, “This really seems a change in style rather than substance.”  Bingo!  And the change I find refreshing!

Then the very event of a Pope comfortably, glibly, confidently visiting and dialoguing with the press!  That in itself, as more than one journalist remarked to me here in New York, is what’s really “revolutionary.”

Young People in Rio – Thanks!

Monday, July 29th, 2013

You did it again, dear participants in World Youth Days . . .

This was my sixth one.  Before each of them, I debate, should I go?  It’s so much trouble, travel, time; it will be unorganized and so jammed; there will be a lot of walking, waiting, and inconvenience . . . is it worth it?

Yes!  Monday morning, home safe and secure, after a glorious week in Rio, yes!   It was worth it!

You young people in Rio, you worked a miracle:  you made me young again!

Our Catholic faith is “ever ancient, ever new.”  At World Youth Days, you young people show us that the wise, tender, loving, grandmotherly Church, with teachings and traditions timeless, is also a dazzlingly beautiful young bride who enchants all of us.

In Rio I marveled at you:  standing in line waiting for us priests to hear your confessions, that dramatic occasion of the conversion of heart we all crave;

Kneeling silently before the Real Presence of Jesus in the Holy Eucharist;

Singing and embracing as you walked for miles in wind, rain, and chill (it was their winter);

Attentive at the three catechetical sessions I was privileged to lead, thoughtful in your questions and testimonies, so joyful and reverent at Mass;

And you got stronger, more and more enthusiastic, instead of fatigued and bored:  1½ million lining the Holy Father’s motorcade that “welcome ceremony” on Thursday; swelling to 2 million for that moving Stations of the Cross Friday; a crescendo of 3 million for Saturday’s vigil and Sunday Mass.

Copacabana, the three mile stretch of stunning beach, Rio’s jewel.  For carnivalé, Mardi Gras, it’s known for revelry and actions, I hear, less than noble.  Last week, it was the scene of prayer, virtue, friendship, Christian discipleship, solidarity in values and searching, exuberance in cheering the man who simply described himself as an “old pilgrim” among the young, Pope Francis.

You raised none of the “issues” flowing from ideologies or problems in the Church:  nothing about women’s ordination, priestly celibacy, same-sex marriage, the HHS mandate, even immigration or abortion.

You concentrated, not on issues, but on a Person:  the Second Person of the Most Blessed Trinity, Jesus Christ, your thirst for Him, your desire to know, love, and serve Him in His Church. He is the way, the truth, and a life! He is the answer to the question posed by every human life.

Today, back home, I’m tired, hoarse, coughing, sneezing, and out of clothes.  But, I am young again in my faith . . .

. . . thanks to you, Young People of World Youth Days in Rio! See you at the next one.

Remember Lampedusa!

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

You probably didn’t even hear about it:  about a month ago, 12 refugees, fleeing war and poverty in their home, Africa, drowned at sea, victims, not only of a leaky, worn-out, wooden boat, but also of unscrupulous traffickers.  These poor folks were close to sanctuary on the tiny island of Lampedusa, just off the coast of Sicily.

You probably didn’t hear about it, right?  Tragically, it’s hardly news anymore, as the Mediterranean Sea has claimed 19,000 refugees the past 15 years alone.

One man did hear about it, and decided to do something about it:  Pope Francis. Last week, on July 8, he travelled to Lampedusa, his first trip outside of Rome as our Holy Father.

He wanted, he stated, to do penance for our callousness toward refugees, so he offered a Mass of Atonement there on the little island;

He wanted to thank the people of Lampedusa, because so many there have tried to welcome and care for the refugees;

Pope Francis desired to embrace those immigrants who had arrived, and are still in camps and shelters eager to start a new, secure life;

He especially wanted to “wake us up,” to remind the world that, when any human person is treated like trash, even starving, scared, oppressed Africans “on the run,” without anything but hope, all life is degraded!

You probably didn’t see much coverage of his one-day visit to this four mile-long island off Sicily, to this section of the sea that is now an aquatic cemetery to thousands of refugees.

That’s sad. . . because the Holy Father wanted to “wake us up.” Here he showed the tenderness he spoke of last March 19, when he began his service as pastor of the Church universal. The media mostly ignored it.

Something tells me that this Pope is not about to drop it. As Harry Bosch, the L.A. police detective in Michael Connelly’s series, repeats, “Everybody counts, or nobody counts.”

This Pope will not let us forget anybody:  the baby in the womb, the immigrant, the refugee, the beggar, the elders, the sick, the homeless and fleeing, the prisoners – – “Everybody counts… or nobody counts.”

Remember Lampedusa!  Cry for the victims; do penance for our ignoring their plight; resolve to welcome the immigrant and refugee.

Pope Francis… like Jesus, like St. Francis… is going to nag us about it!