Archive for the ‘Cardinal Dolan’ Category

Filling Thanksgiving Plates

Monday, November 25th, 2013

Collaborating once again in a unified effort to tackle hunger, Catholic Charities and UJA-Federation of New York kicked off our second joint Feeding Our Neighbors: An Interfaith Response initiative on Sunday, November 24, 2013, at the YM & YWHA of Washington Heights & Inwood.  Volunteers assembled 750 Thanksgiving and Hanukkah–themed kosher food packages for distribution to low-income, homebound residents of Washington Heights through a Catholic Charities food pantry and UJA-Federation beneficiary agencies.

This marked the first in a series of specific efforts this season to strengthen the resources for food pantries so they can collect and distribute one million meals throughout New York during winter’s cruelest months.

In the five boroughs, hunger affects approximately 1.4 million individuals. In addition, approximately 2.6 million — or nearly one in three — New Yorkers experience difficulty affording food for themselves and their families. Meanwhile, approximately 1.9 million New Yorkers across all faiths and ethnic communities rely on SNAP, the food stamp program that undergone funding cuts.

Feeding Our Neighbors: An Interfaith Response unites Catholic Charities and UJA-Federation of New York, two of the largest faith-based, not-for-profit organizations to raise awareness about the issue of hunger and food insufficiency in the community. Through the shared values of “No hungry neighbor should be turned away” and “Let all who are hungry come and eat” the Catholic and Jewish communities collectively pledge to make a difference in the lives of those who are hungry and in need. The interfaith initiative stems from Catholic Charities’ Feeding Our Neighbors campaign, an effort to fight hunger by replenishing dwindling supplies in emergency food programs that continue to be stretched thin.

“Catholic Charities is proud to partner with UJA-Federation on this initiative to replenish the food pantries and soup kitchens in our community. Unfortunately, so many families in our community rely on these to survive,” said Monsignor Kevin Sullivan, executive director of Catholic Charities. “Over the next few months, with the disturbing cuts to SNAP, our joint projects are even more important for New York’s neediest.”

UJA-Federation and Catholic Charities will meet once again in January when Cardinal Timothy Dolan, Msgr. Sullivan and Dr. Ruskay will collect food packages outside of St. Patrick’s Cathedral for distribution to a Catholic Charities food pantry and to a UJA-Federation beneficiary agency.

Watch this FOX 5 clip of the event 

See more on NY1 

Help us feed our neighbors.

 

 

 

 

Why I’m Running for Team Catholic Charities

Monday, October 28th, 2013

By Fr. Joseph Tyrrell 

My inspiration for running marathons?  Well it all began because my feet were killing me.  Seriously.

When I started serving as Master of Ceremonies at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in 2008 I used to wonder how people can stand for so long.  And I noticed that one of my fellow priests – ten years my senior – was not complaining.

His trick, he ran, not much, just a little.

Well, I had always been into sports.  I pole vaulted, high jumped and played goalie for my high school hockey team and still bicycled and roller bladed in Central Park.  But, according to my aching feet, this clearly was not enough.  So, I started running for my health.

In December I started running and in January I began training for the New York City marathon.  I have now run in four marathons, three in New York and one in Phoenix.

As a pastor, I talk a lot about the importance of tithing, not just in treasure but in time and talent as well.    Tithing in treasure is easy to figure out.  I just donate ten-percent of my salary as a pastor. Donating time is easy to figure as well.  But figuring out how to donate my talent was tougher.  I finally realized that I could run for a good cause and tithe my talent.

For the past 4 years I ran to raise funds for the National MS Society.  A priest friend of mine struggles with Multiple Sclerosis.  I did a good job, too, raising over  $40,000 thanks to generous folks who supported my run.

This year, I chose Catholic Charities as the best way to tithe my talent.  Over the past 25 years I have worked closely with them, sending  numerous parishioners in crises to them for help.  I’ve seen firsthand the good  work Catholic Charities does helping children, those facing eviction and those needing support.

Moreover, thanks to Cardinal Dolan and a surprise encounter, witnessing him speed walking, I’m taking my training more seriously.  We were in Central Park, and here he comes, rosary in one hand, cigar in the other  and he passed me.

I realized I better start running faster.  Please wish me luck and support me and Team Catholic Charities in the upcoming NYC ING Marathon.

Thank you!

Help support Fr. Joseph Tyrells’s ING NYC Marathon campaign. Click here to find out how: http://www.crowdrise.com/CatholicCharitiesNYC2013/fundraiser/josephtyrrell

What You Need to Know About Hurricane Sandy One Year Anniversary Events

Monday, October 21st, 2013

By Alice Kenny

As the first anniversary of Hurricane Sandy approaches on October 29, Catholic Charities joins clergy and laity to celebrate survivors and draw attention to their remaining needs.

Cardinal Timothy Dolan will be the principal celebrant of a First Anniversary Hurricane Sandy Mass of Remembrance on Oct. 27 at 3 p.m. at Our Lady Star of the Sea R.C. Church in Huguenot, reports the Staten Island Advance.

The cardinal plans to honor the victims, survivors and the relief efforts of the Island’s Roman Catholic churches and Catholic Charities.

Meanwhile, the March of Dimes at its upcoming gala plans to honor Joseph Panepinto, executive director of Staten Island Catholic Charities, and San Diego Padres’ pitcher Jason Marquis with Humanitarian Awards for their work on behalf of Sandy survivors.

Read more in the Staten Island Advance about why Joseph Panepinto received this award.

Check out the Staten Island Advance for a list of upcoming Sandy One Year Anniversary events.

Welcoming Newcomers From Cardinal Dolan

Friday, October 18th, 2013

Cardinal Dolan hits the mark in the WSJ piece today on immigrants in the United States and the concern and role of the Catholic Church. Read it here: http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303918804579107131431541914?mod=djemEditorialPage_h

Cardinal Dolan points out three important ways that Catholic Charities works with immigrants: the dissemination of good information to thousands of immigrants each year through the New Americans Hotline, English and civic classes at the new International Center and support to day laborers in Yonkers. Right now, prayer combined with hard work is needed ensure that those rumblings in Washington, D.C. about possible immigration reform and a good Farm Bill will happen. This Farm Bill addresses the need for supplemental meals that so many families rely on. The immigration bill must address a broken immigration system with fair policies that address family unity, a pathway out of the shadows, border security and a legal option for businesses to hire the workers they need. For the individuals and families that Catholic Charities serves, both of these are critical.

Hope for New Immigration Policy; Are You Eligible for Deferred Action?

Friday, August 9th, 2013
 
By Ben Ros
Recent support in Washington for the Senate immigration bill has many looking forward to comprehensive immigration reform. For many, however, help is already here: since the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) bill passed last year, millions have become eligible for protection from deportation. Catholic Charities can help you find out if you are eligible for deferred action or prepare for possible new reforms.

Movers and shakers across religious and political spectrums are offering the issue their support. This week Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg joins His Eminence, Timothy Michael Cardinal Dolan and Msgr. Kevin Sullivan (proponents of the Catholic community’s long-standing pro-immigrant stance) in working to reform immigration policy.

You may be eligible for deferred action if you:

  • Have come to the United States under the age of 16 and not be above the age of 30.
  • Have resided in the United States continuously for at least five years before June 15, 2012, and have been present in the United States as of June 15, 2012.
  • Be in school, have graduated from high school, have obtained a GED certificate or be honorably discharged veterans of the Armed Forces of the United States.
  • Have not been convicted of a felony offense, a significant misdemeanor offense or multiple mi
    sdemeanor offenses, or otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.

Call the New York State New Americans Hotline: 1 (800) 566-7636 — open Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. — to speak with someone who can help you through the process or visit the USCIS website to learn more.

 

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Burned Down, Rebuilt and Cherished, New Community Center Both Reality and Miracle

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2013

By Alice Kenny 

At a grand-opening event marked by laughter, tears and gratitude, Timothy Michael Cardinal Dolan blessed the Catholic Charities Community Center on Adams Street last Friday, June 28.

“Isn’t this place something,” Cardinal Dolan said. “The word miracle’s been used and I don’t think that’s an exaggeration. When you come in here you feel right at home…There’s a warmth; there’s an embrace…That’s what we like and that’s what people need and deserve.”

The building was bought by Catholic Charities in 2009 and was being renovated with a $2.1 million state grant after a fire on Dec. 21, 2010 wracked considerable damage to the three-story former St. Peter’s School building. The roof collapsed and there was smoke and water damage throughout the 18,000-square-foot structure.

On Friday, after offering his blessing, the cardinal splashed holy water and joked, “This is a fire retardant, too.”

The Catholic Charities center, formally known as the Father Edmund Burke Ulster County Catholic Charities Community Center, is at 6 Adams Street on a property perched above lower Broadway in the Kingston’s Rondout District. Fr. Burke, formerly the priest at St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church on lower Broadway, attended Friday’s ceremony.

The center was about a week away from opening when the 2010 fire set back the renovation effort. Following a second round of renovations, the center now is home to the offices for Ulster County Catholic Charities; a food pantry run by the group; the Agri-Business Child Development agency that offers early childhood education and social services to farm workers’ families and other eligible families; and a large gymnasium for Catholic Youth Organization sports programs. The gym hosted Friday’s ceremony.

Rebuilding the center relied on teamwork and hard work. Thomas J. Kelly, Regional Director of Ulster County Catholic Charities, extended special recognition to Johann Huleatt on behalf of the Bruderhof Community and Community Playthings for their gift of equipment and toys for the renovated waiting room and Tom Urtz and Lew Foote on behalf of ShopRite Supermarkets and the Wakefern Group for their donation of wire shelving and refrigeration units used in the center’s new food pantry.

“Who goes to Catholic Charities?” Cardinal Dolan asked a crowd that included Catholic Charities Executive Director Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, New York Assemblyman Kevin Cahill, Kingston Mayor Shane Gallo and a host of others.

“People who have no where else to go,” he answered. “That’s what this is about…You got somebody hungry; You got somebody who needs legal help, … immigration help …a loving, safe, tender place for their kids. You need some place where our people can recreate. They come here because there’s a magnificent diversity of ways that we welcome people as family. We honor their human dignity. We recognize them as a child of God.”

 

Heroes Honored at the 77th Annual CYO Club of Champions Tribute; Crucial Funds Raised for CYO Youth

Monday, July 1st, 2013

CYO Honorees (L-R) Haeda Mihaltses, Rod Gilbert, Cardinal Dolan and Tim Brosnan

Fox 5′s”Good Day New York co-anchor Greg Kelly emceed as representatives from Major League Baseball, the New York Rangers and Mayor Bloomberg’s Intergovernmental Affairs office were honored at the 77th Catholic Youth Organization (CYO) Club of Champions Tribute and Dinner last Wednesday, June 26, at The Waldorf=Astoria.  Attended by more than 400 people, the event raised more than $600,000 to help fund inner-city community centers, parish-based athletic, cultural, volunteer and scouting programs and other initiatives throughout the Archdiocese of New York.

“The Club of Champions dinner celebrates CYO’s legacy and future of building today’s youth into tomorrow’s leaders,” Monsignor Kevin Sullivan said.

Timothy J. Brosnan, Executive Vice President, Major League Baseball, received the CYO Club of Champions’ Gold Medal, which is awarded annually to an individual who has provided inspiration and leadership for the youth of New York City.  Rod Gilbert, Director, Special Projects, Community Relations Representative of the New York Rangers, received the John V. Mara Sportsman of the Year Award, given to individuals who exhibited exceptional sportsmanship throughout their careers.  And Haeda Mihaltses, Director of the Mayor’s Office of Intergovernmental Affairs, received the Terence Cardinal Cooke Humanitarian Award for their outstanding commitment to youth.

Honorary Co-Chairs of the event included His Eminence, Timothy Michael Cardinal Dolan, Mrs. Margaret F. Grace, Mrs. Wellington T. Mara, Commissioner Bud Selig and Mr. Roger Staubach.  Dinner Co-Chairs include:d Elizabeth Comerford, Mitchell Modell and Joseph Niciforo.

“The generosity of our honorees, Tim Brosnan, Haeda Mihaltses and Rod Gilbert and their colleagues and friends is greatly appreciated and critically needed,” Monsignor Sullivan added.  “Through CYO, tens of thousands of New York youth of all religions participate in healthy and wholeness sports, cultural and other recreational activities throughout the year.”

All proceeds from the event support CYO programs that serve thousands of children and young people –non-Catholic and Catholic alike– throughout the Archdiocese of New York.

CYO supports the work of hundreds of parishes throughout the Archdiocese of New York to administer organized athletics programs for more than 24,000 children and youth ages 4 to 21 in the Archdiocesan region. Strongly rooted in local communities, CYO programs are organized around parishes with parental participation at the local level.  In keeping with our mission, CYO Athletic Programs serve youth without regard to race, ethnicity, gender or religion.  Through this broad array of recreational and spiritual growth and development opportunities, CYO promotes lives of promise, accomplishment and hope for young New Yorkers.

Catholic Charities Gala Benefit: Creating Partnerships Among New Yorkers

Friday, May 24th, 2013

L-R: Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, Pat Battle, Timothy Michael Cardinal Dolan, Eugene M. McQuade, Stephen J. Brogan and Catherine Kinney

May 24, 2013, New York, NY – His Eminence Timothy Michael Cardinal Dolan and the Board of Trustees of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York honored Eugene M. McQuade, Chief Executive Officer, Citibank and Stephen J. Brogan, Managing Partner, Jones Day at its Gala Benefit at The Waldorf-Astoria in New York City yesterday, May 23, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. 

“The Catholic Charities Annual Gala permits us to create stronger partnerships among New Yorkers,” stated Executive Director Msgr. Kevin Sullivan. “Our outstanding honorees, their colleagues and friends along with generous Catholic Charities donors come together to ensure that New Yorkers in need – non-Catholics and Catholics alike – are helped with meeting basic human needs so that they might live their lives in greater dignity.”

This signature black tie dinner convened a dynamic group of New Yorkers from the worlds of business, philanthropy, culture, fashion, law, media, politics and religion who share a deep concern for the well-being of our fellow New Yorkers in need. It raised close to $2.3 million.

Pat Battle, anchor for NBC 4 New York, served as Mistress of Ceremonies. Award-winning actress, singer and recording artist Liz Calloway, who held leading roles in several Broadway productions including Miss Saigon and Cats, performed live.

Over the course of a career spanning more than three decades, honoree Eugene M. McQuade distinguished himself as a business and industry leader. Before joining Citi as Chief Executive Officer of Citibank in 2009, he served as Vice Chairman and President of Merrill Lynch Banks (U.S.) and previously had been President at Freddie Mac, Bank of America and Fleet Boston Financial. He is a Trustee to the Boys & Girls Clubs of America and the American Ireland Fund.

“Tonight is a celebration of the terrific work Catholic Charities does every year to ensure that our neediest New Yorkers, regardless of faith, get the support they need to improve their lives,” said Mr. McQuade. “I’m gratified and humbled to be recognized, but tonight is about shining a spotlight on the enormous positive impact Catholic Charities has on our city.”

Fellow honoree Stephen J. Brogan, Managing Partner of Jones Day since 2002, began his career with the firm while still a student at Notre Dame Law School. He worked as Deputy Assistant Attorney General at the U.S. Department of Justice from 1981-1983. He serves as Chair of the Academic and Faculty Affairs Committee of the Board of Trustees of the University of Notre Dame. He is also a member of the Board of Trustees of the Cleveland Clinic.

“The long history of Catholic Charities’ dedicated and selfless service to people in need in the City of New York is a very important manifestation of the Catholic Church’s commitment to social justice and to the care of the less fortunate,” said Mr. Brogan.

About Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York
Catholic Charities, a federation of approximately 90 agencies and programs located throughout the 10 counties of the Archdiocese of New York, helps solve the problems of New Yorkers in need – non-Catholics and Catholics alike – with services that protect and nurture children, resolve family crises, assist the hungry and homeless, support the physically and emotionally challenged, and integrate immigrants and refugees. For more information on how to donate or volunteer, please visit our website at www.catholiccharitiesny.org.

Immigration Reform; This Suffering Must End

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013
  • USCCB President says “Now is the Time” to reform Immigration system
  • Cardinal Dolan: Suffering of migrants must end
  • Path to citizenship should be improved and families protected
  • Enforcement should guarantee basic human rights

WASHINGTON—Cardinal Timothy Dolan of New York, president of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), said in a press conference April 22 that “now is the time” to fix the nation’s broken immigration system. Cardinal Dolan was joined at the press conference by Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles, chairman of the USCCB Committee on Migration, and Bishop John C. Wester of Salt Lake City, chair of the USCCB Communications Committee.

“Let me say that now is the time to address this issue,” Cardinal Dolan said. “As we speak, persons are being deported and an untold number of families are being divided. Human beings continue to die in the American desert. This suffering must end.”

The Catholic Church has much to bring to the national immigration debate, given the Church’s history as an immigrant church, “having welcomed successive waves of immigrants into our parishes, social service programs, hospitals, and schools,” Cardinal Dolan said. “As the pastor of the archdiocese of perhaps the greatest immigrant city in the world, I know first-hand of the many efforts that have been made by the Catholic community on behalf of immigrants.”

He pledged to work with the sponsors of immigration legislation and other elected officials to “achieve the most humane legislation possible.”

In responding to recently introduced immigration reform legislation in the U.S. Senate, Archbishop Gomez said the path to citizenship for the undocumented population in the legislation is welcome, but certain requirements “could leave many behind, remaining in the shadows.” He pointed to the need to shorten the time required to obtain citizenship, to create a more generous cut-off date and to remove barriers for low-income migrants as areas for improvement.

“If the goal [of the legislation] is to solve the problem in a humane manner, then all undocumented persons should be able to participate,” Archbishop Gomez said. He also cited the need to preserve family unity as the cornerstone of the nation’s immigration system.

“This is an important and historic moment for our country and for the Church,” Archbishop Gomez added. “We hope to see the legislation improve and advance, and we will work toward that end. The lives of millions of our fellow human beings depend upon it.”

Bishop Wester said that eligibility for permanent status and citizenship should not be contingent upon enforcement initiatives contained in the legislation. He warned that it could create a de-facto permanent underclass.

Bishop Wester also called for the immigration debate to be conducted in a “civil and respectful” manner.

“This is an important and historic moment for our country and for the Church,” Archbishop Gomez concluded. “We hope to see the legislation improve and advance, and we will work toward that end. The lives of millions of our fellow human beings depend upon it.”

 

Statements on Immigration Proposal

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013

April 17, 2013

Continuing the Catholic Church’s longstanding commitment to immigration and immigrants, Archbishop Jose Gomez, Archbishop of Los Angeles and the chairman of the USCCB’s Committee on Migration, released a statement of welcome for the immigration reform legislation introduced in the Senate today, and pledged that the bishops would carefully examine the bill and work with Congress to ensure that any final measure respects the dignity and basic human rights of migrants.

Here is an excerpt:

The introduction of U.S. Senate bipartisan legislation to reform the U.S. immigration system was welcomed by Archbishop José H. Gomez of Los Angeles, chairman of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops’ (USCCB) Committee on Migration, April 17. Archbishop Gomez also pledged that the U.S. bishops would carefully examine the legislation and work with Congress to ensure that any final measure respects the basic human rights and dignity of migrants.

“I welcome the introduction of legislation today in the U.S. Senate,” Archbishop Gomez said. “The U.S. bishops look forward to carefully examining the legislation and working with Congress to fashion a final bill that respects the basic human rights and dignity of newcomers to our land—migrants, refugees, and other vulnerable populations.”

Click here  to read the whole press release on the USCCB website.

 

Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, Executive Director of Catholic Charities, also released a statement to the press today.

Here is his statement:

“We are hopeful that the filing of a bipartisan Senate bill on immigration seems, after many years, to make comprehensive immigration reform a real possibility. We appreciate the hard work of the group of Senators and others that has made this possible. We note with special pride and recognition the work of so many Catholic organizations and the leadership of the Bishops on this issue. While we are hopeful and supportive, the bill is complex and requires careful analysis. There will be opposition. We look forward to making suggestions for improving the bill to even better reflect our longstanding concerns for family unification, a fair, legal immigration system, protections for temporary workers, effective, yet humane border security and due process in enforcement. We look forward to working in partnership with many to ensure that this reform happens for a straightforward reason—concern for the common good of the nation and the well-being of individual immigrants and their families.”

Click here to learn how Catholic Charities is helping immigrants and their families.