Archive for the ‘Parishes’ Category

Freedom Isn’t Free

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014

Deacon Rodney Beckford, Director of Catholic Charities at the Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Center in Harlem, took on the tough issues of broken families, estrangement from the Church and the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King. Jr. when he shared his personal testimony  at St. Gregory the Great Church in Crown Heights.

Deacon Beckford served as guest speaker at the January 20th event that celebrated the birthday of Dr. King.  The deacon spoke about  growing up in the time of Dr. King and becoming estranged from the Church for a time after the civil rights leader was slain.

The full story is published in this recent issue of The Tablet.

“God always sends a prophet to bring light into darkness,” Deacon Beckford said. “In our time, it was Dr. Martin Luther King.”

 Like many biblical prophets, he said, Dr. King heard the Good News in a dream, and he proclaimed that truth throughout his life. 

“That truth is that freedom isn’t free, that you have to pay the price for your liberty. Dr. King taught us that it is possible to make a way. He made hope our shield and faith our weapon of choice against evil, against sin, against the devil.

“What enabled him to march on?” asked Deacon Beckford. “It was the truth – the truth of knowing that the Lord was his shepherd, the truth of knowing that nothing is impossible for He who walks on water.”

Prayer, he told the congregation, was at the root of everything Dr. King did to bring about social change before his life was cut short.

“But don’t think that because Martin is in his glory that the battle is won,” the deacon said. “The devil is still in the ’hood.”

He spoke about the breakdown of family and society as evidenced by thirty-somethings becoming grandparents, siblings with different fathers, children being raised by grandparents, youngsters wearing improper attire and an overall shift toward self-absorption. 

In these “confused times,” he said the way to “get back on track” is to walk the walk of the One who walked on water, starting with the Word.

He challenged the faithful to learn some Scripture by heart and further memorialize Dr. King by spreading the Good News and volunteering in their local community.

“If you want to honor Dr. Martin Luther King, take what he has done and make something of it,” Deacon Beckford said. “Turn the dream into reality.”

CYO Celebrates Super Bowl as It Helps Feed Our Neighbors

Monday, February 3rd, 2014

By Alice Kenny

Cheering and booing as the Seahawks trounced the Broncos, CYO teammates, coaches and kids from Resurrection parish in Rye gathered yesterday at Butterfield 8 restaurant in White Plains to celebrate the Super Bowl and raise funds for the Feeding Our Neighbors campaign.

Over 50 families from Resurrection’s CYO program attended this event they organized and hosted. Together, they raised more than $10,000 for the Feeding Our Neighbors campaign that will enable us to feed 40,000 additional hungry New Yorkers.

The Catholic Youth Organization (CYO) is a division of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York. CYO programs across the Archdiocese participated in the Feeding Our Neighbors food drive campaign.

The campaign represents a united effort to fight hunger. It responds to Timothy Cardinal Dolan’s call that we all do our part to replenish the food pantries and soup kitchens in our community that so many families in our community rely on to survive.

100% of contributions to the campaign will support local food pantries that serve New Yorkers, non-Catholic and Catholic alike.

The NFL season has ended but hunger continues to grow.

Help us Feed Our Neighbors.

Click here and specify “Feeding Our Neighbors” in the comments field.
Or text “CCHOPE” to 85944 to make a quick, easy $10 donation.

Cardinal Dolan Visits Holy Rosary & Don Bosco Community Center in Portchester

Monday, February 3rd, 2014

 

During Cardinal Dolan’s visit to Holy Rosary parish and its Don Bosco Community Center in Port Chester on Friday,  he spoke of the strong collaboration of Catholic Charities with both the parish and the center.

Catholic Charities social worker Mariana Duenas has been providing professional services for almost a decade.  The Don Bosco Community Center was the site of a recent Feeding Our Neighbors service event.

Our immigration services have provided informational sessions at the parish.  There is a connection being developed with day laborer programs at the Don Bosco Worker Center and the Obreros Unidos de Yonkers at St. Peter’s parish in Yonkers.

Just 3 Days Left for Feeding Our Neighbors Campaign

Friday, January 31st, 2014

By Alice Kenny

Only three days left for you to pitch in with Feeding Our Neighbors, our Archdiocesan-wide weeklong drive to replenish food pantries supporting non-Catholics and Catholics alike.

“Pope Francis recently wrote ‘if we don’t share our life is a slow suicide,’” Timothy Cardinal Dolan told a crowd at St. Patrick’s Cathedral at the kickoff to this year’s campaign.  “And this is a very simple from-the-heart appeal to share food and it works at this cold time of the year when Christmas charity is almost exhausted and when people are looking for food.”

There is just one goal for Feeding Our Neighbors: that New Yorkers answer the call to feed those who are suffering in our community.

Click here and join us in Feeding our Neighbors and  specify “Feeding Our Neighbors” in the comments field on our Online Gift page.

Or text “CCHOPE” to 85944 to make a quick, easy $10 donation. 

Watch and listen as Cardinal Dolan speaks about Feeding Our Neighbors at St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

“The Feeding Our Neighbors campaign works,” Cardinal Dolan said.

Cardinal Egan Leads Avonte Oquendo’s Funeral Mass

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014
Photo Credit: AARON SHOWALTER/NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

Photo Credit: AARON SHOWALTER/NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

By Alice Kenny

Cardinal Edward M. Egan, the former archbishop of New York, delivered the funeral Mass at St. Joseph’s Church in Greenwich Village this weekend for Avonte Oquendo, the 14-year-old nonverbal boy with severe autism who disappeared from his school in Queens.  His remains, after months of searching, were found last week along the East River.

Cardinal Egan saluted the outpouring of kindness New Yorkers offered when they hunted for Avonte and now as they mourn his loss.

We understand, of course, that no one but Avonte’s parents can know the challenges they faced when they struggled to protect this special boy and the searing pain they feel now.

We understand this at Catholic Charities because, day in and day out, we provide support for persons with disabilities and their families.

To live with dignity and in safety, the senior adjusting to recent blindness, the developmentally disabled child, and the emotionally challenged adult need the intensive care and support provided by Catholic Charities. Through a network of specialized services, Catholic Charities cares compassionately for the most vulnerable New Yorkers – non-Catholics and Catholics alike.

Our thoughts and prayers are with Avonte and his family.

Do you have a disability or a family member facing challenges and looking for help?

For more information about a particular program and/or service, click below:

Supportive Housing for the Mentally Ill Caregiver Respite
Residences for Special Needs Adaptive Services for Deaf and Blind
Early Intervention and Special Education

 

If you need help in finding the services you need, please call the Catholic Charities Help line at: 888-744-7900.

For more information about Avonte Oquendo’s funeral, watch this video on CBS.

Feeding Our Neighbors Campaign

Sunday, January 26th, 2014

By Alice Kenny

To confront the crisis of growing hunger in New York, we kick off today, Sunday, January 26, Feeding Our Neighbors.  This united campaign to fight hunger responds  to Timothy Cardinal Dolan’s call that we all do our part to replenish the food pantries and soup kitchens that so many families in our community rely on to survive.

To further this effort, Msgr. Kevin Sullivan just met with one of our state’s top elected officials, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, to share the Catholic Charities perspective on hunger and food insufficiency.  The Senator convened a very small policy roundtable this Sunday with leaders of food provider organizations and key advocates to discuss the impact of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) cuts in New York.

More and more New Yorkers have been reaching out to soup kitchens to feed their families,  reports CBS News in this just-released report*:

  • New research released this week by the Food Bank for New York City reveals that most of the city’s food pantries have seen a sharp increase in visitors.
  • The trend follows a $5 billion national cut to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program that went into effect Nov. 1.
  • The cuts affect nearly 2 millionNew York City residents who receive benefits from the program.

 

Feeding Our Neighbors, sponsored by organizations throughout the Archdiocese of New York and managed by Catholic Charities, will use 100% of contributions to the campaign to support local food pantries that serve New Yorkers, non-Catholic and Catholic alike.

Please join us in Feeding Our Neighbors.

The time is now, January 26th - Sunday, February 2nd  2014.

Take one small action to help feed the hungry.

Together, we can change lives.
Support a Fundraising Drive.

Donate through Catholic Charities and type “Feeding Our Neighbors” in the comments field.

Text “CCHOPE” to 85944 to make a quick $10 donation.


Feed the Big White Box.

Bring non-perishable foods to a “Feeding Our Neighbors” food drive at any Catholic parish in the New York Archdiocese, the Catholic Charities headquarters at1011 First Avenue, or anyArchdio cesan Catholic School.

 

*Check out the report on CBS news.

New York Times Reports Increased Demand for Food Banks as Donations Decline

Friday, January 24th, 2014

By Alice Kenny

Exacerbating cuts made last November in food stamp programs that feed the hungry, Congress is now eying significant additional reductions, reports The New York Times on Wednesday, January 22.

“Food banks across the country,” reports The New York Times, “are increasing efforts to prepare for the increased demand even as donations decline.”*

It is crucial now more than ever to join with us in Feeding Our Neighbors, our united effort to fight hunger.

Now in its third year, Catholic Charities will be joined by UJA/Federation to make Feeding Our Neighbors 2014 an interfaith campaign on behalf of New York’s hungry.

Starting January 26th, we’ll be leveraging our collective reach and already expansive networks for even greater impact — with the goal of collecting and distributing a combined one million meals to feed the hungry throughout New York.

Too many children and families struggle every day with hunger.

Feeding Our Neighbors, An Interfaith Response unites Catholic Charities and UJA-Federation of New York, two of the largest faith-based, not-for-profit organizations, to combine efforts to help fight hunger and replenish dwindling supplies.

You can be part of this united effort.  Help us collect and distribute food packages across pantries and shelters throughout the New York area.

Because ultimately, we do the most when we do it together.

Please join us!

Click here to donate – and write “Feeding Our Neighbors” in the comments field.

Reading this on your smart phone?  Text CCHOPE to 85944 to make a one-time $10 donation.   (Standard text rates apply.)

*Read the full story in The New York Times.

 

From Super Heroes to Liturgical Dance

Tuesday, January 21st, 2014

By Alice Kenny

Looking for Super Heroes Movement classes, African Drum instruction or just good old ballet lessons?  Check out Catholic Charities Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Center’s new Project Performing Arts dance programs for children.

Administered by Nina Klivert-Lawson, this former performing arts director worked for 26 years at The Harbor, a well-known community organization in East Harlem.  She and her instructors collaborate with Catholic Charities and the Archdiocese Office of Black Ministry to provide classes to youth registered as members of the center.

Volunteer instructors screened by Catholic Charities’ volunteer division provide skilled instruction each Saturday at Kennedy Center.  Not surprisingly, the various dance classes – that also include drama as well as modern, liturgical, jazz and African dance – have often attracted over 70 participants ages 4 years to 18.

These new classes bring added life to this already active center. They also broaden the center’s reach to middle-school-aged children and their parents, linking them to the numerous social and social service programs offered there.   Perhaps most important, the programs expose neighborhood children to the arts while encouraging life-skill disciplines that help them perform better in school and in life.

 

Martin Luther King: “Life’s Most Persistent and Urgent Question”

Monday, January 20th, 2014

By Alice Kenny

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. said  that “life’s most persistent and urgent question is ‘what are you doing for others?’”

Today, as they celebrate Martin Luther King Jr.’s Interfaith Day of Service, 80 Catholic and Jewish teens from Westchester are giving an answer.

Forty youth from St. Peter’s Parish in Yonkers and Holy Rosary in Port Chester will join 40 youth from UJA-Federation to provide a meal and activities for 300 persons in need at the Don Bosco Community Center in Port Chester.

The day starts early for these 80 teens as they set up, prepare and serve midday meals.  They will also offer art and crafts activities for children attending the event.

The day then ends as youth lead an ecumenical period of reflection; an opportunity to build community while raising hunger awareness.

The event is part of Feeding Our Neighbors, an interfaith campaign to replenish food pantries and soup kitchens that serve those in need.

“What are you doing for others?” Rev. King asked.

Join us in answering this urgent question.

 

Read more in the Daily Voice.

Mayor de Blasio meets with Cardinal Dolan; Discusses Catholic Charities and work done on behalf of those in need

Tuesday, January 14th, 2014

LUCAS JACKSON/REUTERS

Cardinal Timothy Dolan and Mayor Bill de Blasio met yesterday for the first time since the mayor took office to discuss how they might collaborate to foster the common good – particularly helping New Yorkers most in need.

They hope to convince Pope Francis – who the mayor called “the most powerful voice on earth on how to address inequality” — to visit the city to lend his voice to the urgent task of building a more compassionate and just New York.

“We talked a lot about Catholic Charities and the work it does on behalf of children, on behalf of people in need,” Mayor de Blasio said.

“We talked about the need to help prisoners returning to society, a whole host of areas (including affordable housing) where we have common ground and where we can work together.

Catholic Charities Executive Director Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, who attended the post- meeting press briefing and is serving on the mayor’s transition team, said  “I am not surprised, but still delighted, that the Mayor recognizes the tremendous good being done by our federation of Catholic Charities agencies in touching and responding to almost every human need… We look forward to working with the de Blasio administration and are already convening agencies experienced in these areas to discuss how we might best work with the new administration to expand these services and meet unmet needs.” Read Msgr. Sullivan’s full statement here.

Cardinal Dolan regularly visits Catholic Charities agencies and meets both those being served and the dedicated staff and volunteers.  Cardinal Dolan was upbeat and expressed his strong desire to work with Mayor de Blasio for the sake of the good of New York, and especially those most in need.