Archive for the ‘Strengthening Families and Resolving Crises’ Category

Missed Out on the Boston Marathon? Run with Us in the Big Leagues; Team Catholic Charities in the TCS NYC Marathon!

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

By Alice Kenny

Inspired by yesterday’s great news about Meb Keflezighi becoming the first American to win the Boston Marathon since 1983?

Wish that winner had been you?

You’re just in time to join the Big Team in the Big City.

That’s us, Team Catholic Charities NY in the upcoming TCS New York City Marathon.

Catholic Charities is one of the official charity participants for the 2014 TCS New York City Marathon.

And as you likely already know, there are only a few ways to get into this exclusive event.

Elite runners qualify based on running time.  Lucky ones – just 6 percent – get selected through a lottery. Members of New York Road Runners (NYRR) qualify by running 9 races and volunteering for one.

And remarkable people like you qualify by running for charity.

During the next 6 months, ten runners on Team Catholic Charities New York will dedicate themselves to two challenges: training to run 26.2 miles through every borough of New York City, and fundraising for The St. Nicholas Project, our Catholic Charities initiative that provides nearly 4,000 New Yorkers in need with warm clothing, blankets and more during the cold winter months.

Apply to join the TCS New York City Marathon and join Team Catholic Charities NY to get the experience of a lifetime.

If selected for Team Catholic Charities NY, here’s what you’ll get:

  • Guaranteed entry into the 2014 TCS New York City Marathon
  • An official Team Catholic Charities New York runner’s singlet
  • Personal fundraising website on Crowdrise
  • Fundraising tips
  • Access to NYRR Marathon Training Program
  • Team gathering at a NYC restaurant
  • Being part of a mission that helps children and families in need
  • Two million fans cheering you on

Visit this blog regularly for updates on our team, information about how you can get involved as a Team Catholic Charities NY volunteer, and how you can run in one of New York City’s most exciting athletic events.

Know someone who’s eager to run the TCS NYC Marathon?
Share this
post with them and tell them about this special opportunity.

Find us online:

Team Catholic Charities NY:

www.catholiccharitiesny.org/TeamCathCharitiesNY

 Crowdrise:

http://bit.ly/QfVBsp

As Sandy Recovery Stalls, Wall Street Journal Interviews Msgr. Sullivan for Solutions

Monday, April 21st, 2014

By Alice Kenny

_DSC1063In the Wall Street Journal’s recent series uncovering shortcomings in New York City’s Sandy recovery programs, Reporter Michael Howard Saul turned to Msgr. Kevin Sullivan for insight. Frustrated Hurricane Sandy storm victims and elected officials, Mr. Saul reports, say City Hall has been heavy on promises and short on results.

“Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, executive director of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York, which is helping storm victims, said homeowners’ recovery efforts ‘have been made even more challenging by layers of red tape brought on by the multiple layers of government agencies involved in the process.’”

To counter this morass, Mayor Bill de Blasio told the Wall Street Journal that his recently appointed administration has been working “day and night to hack through the red tape.”

Meanwhile, Catholic Charities continues to help Sandy victims recover.  From the time Hurricane Sandy pounded New York, Catholic Charities has been providing disaster relief to those who need it. From disaster response professionals visiting parishes to deliver information and resources, to volunteers collecting and distributing food and supplies, to neighbors checking in on neighbors, the entire Catholic Charities community has responded to meet the human needs of the victims, providing help and creating hope for rebuilding lives.

The New York State Disaster Case Management Program run by Catholic Charities has provided information, referral and disaster case management to nearly 22,000 households.

“Families and homeowners who are rebuilding from the devastating effects of Hurricane Sandy are still facing a complex and long-term recovery,” Msgr. Sullivan said.  “Our long-term case management for these families is critical to navigating some of the unintended consequences that arise such as potentially higher tax bills on their property that they did not anticipate.”

Are you struggling to recover from Superstorm Sandy?

Create Hope This Easter

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014

Easter shows us that pain and suffering is not the final word. There is triumph. There is hope.

We’re here to bring new life to New Yorkers in need that conquers pain, sadness and suffering.

Join us.

Provide help. Create hope.

Transform lives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s NATIONAL VOLUNTEER WEEK – Let’s Celebrate!

Monday, April 7th, 2014

Two Ten Footwear Foundation paint murals to brighten group homes for the mentally ill.

By Alice Kenny

It’s National Volunteer Week, April 6-12, 2014, our opportunity to celebrate our volunteers’ dedication in helping others and encourage others to join the movement.

And while this is Volunteer Week, here at Catholic Charities, where the breadth of the services we offer depends on giving volunteers, every day is Volunteer Day.

We already have celebrations scheduled for our Refugee Resettlement and International Center volunteers on April 22 at 80 Maiden Lane.  And our Alianza division that provides artistic outlets for teens will hold their volunteer celebration on April 24 at La Plaza Beacon.

Join us in celebrating our wonderful volunteers.

Join us in helping change lives.

Getting started as a volunteer is as easy as 1-2-3.

Step One:
Browse our site

Step Two:
Sign up for an orientation.

Step Three:
Roll up your sleeves and join us.

 

 

 

 

Meet Ted Staniecki, Catholic Charities’ Unsung Hero

Thursday, April 3rd, 2014

By Alice Kenny

Old women with walkers shuffled towards the Catholic Charities Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Center in Harlem last month through a foot of snow and ice.  Moms with hungry children in tow herded towards its food bank.

Ted Staniecki, the center’s facilities manager, grabbed a snow shovel with Kennedy Center Director Rodney Beckford,  fellow staff Hector Estrella and Jose Crisostomo, and dug and scraped until they cleared a path.

Times like these are what Ted says he likes most about his job.

It’s Ted’s low key, hands-on approach facing down hurdles that make him a hero among those who know him best.

“I don’t think enjoying my job is work,” Ted says, “so I haven’t worked a day in my life.”

The son of a Waldorf-Astoria doorman, Ted, before transferring his talents to Catholic Charities, worked his way up from middle school teacher and coach to Washington Heights Incarnation School principal.

This was “back in the days,” wrote a Daily News reporter “when the streets outside were so dangerous team members would have to dive to the sidewalk when gangsters pulled out Uzis.”

Challenges Ted braved were so extreme that news outlets across the city covered them.  The Wall Street Journal wrote about how Ted, the founder, driver, assistant couch and all-around godfather of the Incarnation Angels girls CYO basketball team, brought them to city championship in 1997.  Meanwhile, the team shared their home court, the Fort Washington armory shelter, with 1,400 homeless men.

The same year, The New York Times covered a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling allowing public school teachers to provide remedial instruction to students in Catholic school classrooms.  Sounds logical now, but for the prior 12 years, federal law forbid public school teachers from instructing students with special needs on Catholic school property.

So 200 of Incarnation School’s 520 students grades K – 8 would traipse out of the school for remedial help.  They studied in three trailers parked nearby as drivers idled the vans for power and lights.

“We finally got some common sense,” Ted told The Times.

After retiring from Catholic schools, Ted worked as director of the West Bronx CYO Center.  Then, five years ago, he came to Catholic Charities Kennedy Center.

Similar to its Harlem neighborhood, the Center, he says, needed reviving.

“Kennedy Center needed a paint job; it needed pictures; it needed people,” Ted says.

Deacon Rodney Beckford took over as Kennedy Center’s director, joining Ted and a host of supportive staff and administration to transform the once-sleepy center to one now exploding with activity.  From sunrise to sunset, seven days a week, activities ranging from Harambee dance to gospel choirs, from basketball games to social service programs, fill the four-story building with song and action.

Harlem, in turn, is undergoing a similar revival.  The famous Lenox Lounge reopened along with the Red Rooster restaurant.  Congressmen Charlie Rangel lives across the street from Kennedy Center.  Governor David Patterson and former Mayor David Dinkins live nearby.

“Kennedy fits in well helping the neighborhood heal from the tough times it’s been through,” Ted says. “Our staff is balanced – all nationalities – and people who come here just see someone who is here, who is going to help them, going to respect them.”

Read more about Ted in the New York Times.

Read more about Ted  in the New York Daily News.

Celebrating World Autism Day – and the Differences That Make Us Special

Wednesday, April 2nd, 2014

By Alice Kenny

Join us as we celebrate World Autism Day.

Through a network of specialized services, Catholic Charities empowers and cares compassionately for the most vulnerable New Yorkers – non-Catholics and Catholics alike. The developmentally disabled child, the senior adjusting to recent blindness and the emotionally challenged adult need the intensive care and support provided by Catholic Charities to live with dignity and in safety.

“Do not fear people with Autism; embrace them,” says Paul Isaacs, a young writer with autism.
“Do not spite people with Autism; unite them.
“Do not deny people with Autism; accept them for then their abilities will shine.”

Are you or someone you know facing a physical or emotional challenge and looking for help?
Visit us at Catholic Charities and find out more.

Mommy, I’m So Proud of You

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

Fox News’ Good Day Street Talk television show celebrates Women’s History Month, tracking amazing women who are breaking barriers and changing the world.

Good Day Street Talk this week interviewed Grace Institute Executive Director Sherry Krull –who discusses how this Catholic Charities affiliate has been empowering women in the workplace through training and job placement – and Grace Graduate Phara Bernadin who shares her inspiring story.

“Women who are coming to us are incredibly hungry,” Ms. Krull tells Fox News.  “They want to make a change in their lives.

“So it’s such a pleasure for us who are working in the organization to get 150 women all in one room from all different backgrounds, all different boroughs, all different experiences and nurture them, teach them the hard skills they need in terms of Microsoft Office, business communication and also the essential skills, the soft skills- conflict resolution, professional management.

“And also nurture their souls a little bit because they’re coming to us from having struggled.

“So it’s a combination of those skills for six months that …makes them incredibly marketable.”

Phara Bernadin, a recent Grace graduate, agreed.

“It did a great deal for me,” she tells Fox News.

“It’s like a family because you go back and the door’s always open.

“And the way my daughter looks at me and things that she says – ‘Mommy I’m so proud of you…and to me no amount of money or anything can compare to that.”

Grace Institute, an affiliate of Catholic Charities, has been providing tuition-free job-training skills for women in New York City for more than 100 years. The program includes intensive computer, business writing and career development classes.  It prepares students for interviews and draws on its extensive lists of employer contacts to arrange meetings and help the students find work.

Are you an unemployed woman looking to brush up your skills and find a job?

Click here to learn more about Grace Institute and its tuition-free job-training programs for New York City women.

To watch the Fox News interview, visit the video site and click on Part 4.

Family Man Angel Rojas Gunned Down on Bus Ride Home from Work

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

DEBBIE EGAN-CHIN/NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

The last thing Angel Rojas said to his mother was “hello,” reports the New York Daily News today, March 24, 2014.

Angel Rojas, the 39-year-old father who was shot dead by a gangbanger on the B15 bus in Brooklyn Thursday, was calling his mom on his way home from work that night as he always did.

… Then the phone went dead.

Kahton Anderson, 14, who aimed his .357-Magnum pistol at a rival gang member but missed, instead accidentally shooting Rojas, was charged with second-degree murder.

Left behind are Mr. Rojas’ widow, Maria Lopez, and their children, April, 8, and Saury, 12.

An immigrant from the Dominican Republic, Mr. Rojas was working two jobs to support his family.

With Mr. Rojas gone, his widow said she can no longer afford their modest, second-floor Brownsville apartment on the meager pay she earns as a part-time home attendant.

Catholic Charities Executive Director Msgr. Kevin Sullivan attended Mr. Rojas’ wake at Ponce Funeral Home in Brooklyn yesterday.

As the Daily News reports, you can help the family by sending a check to Catholic Charities, 1011 First Ave., New York, NY 10022.

Online donations can be made at CatholicCharitiesny.org.

So far, the fund has raised more than $6,600, including two donations by phone for $1,000 each. A total of 52 people have donated so far.

Learn more about the Rojas family in this Daily News video.

Catholic New York Editorial: More Feeling Hunger’s Effects

Monday, March 24th, 2014

Msgr. Sullivan at St. Jerome’s food pantry

The numbers are shocking, writes Catholic New York in this recent editorial:

 In just five years, the number of New York City residents who depend on food pantries and soup kitchens has shot up to 1.4 million. That’s 200,000 more than in 2008      and it accounts for one-fifth of the city’s residents

And contrary to popular perception, the vast majority of those battling hunger are not the homeless.

They’re older women, they’re working families, they’re children and they’re veterans.

The appalling statistics: 1 in 5 city children live in food scarce homes; 1 in 6 city adults live in food scarce homes; 11.5 percent of people over 60 don’t have   enough food, an increase of 33 percent since 2008; 64 percent of people relying on the city’s food pantries and soup kitchens are women; 95,000 food recipients are     veterans.

The hunger crisis, and it is indeed a crisis, was spotlighted in lengthy and detailed coverage this week in the New York Daily News, which also pointed out the strains   placed on the charitable agencies, many of them Catholic groups, who run the city’s network of some 1,000 food pantries and soup kitchens.

   Catholic New York

 

Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, executive director of the Archdiocesan Catholic Charities, told the paper that people are turning to us for emergency help because it’s so hard for them to find jobs, or decent-paying jobs. Many, he added, don’t have enough to pay rent and to eat.

To lend an immediate hand and get personal insight he can share with legislators, Msgr. Sullivan is making the rounds, rolling up his sleeves and helping out at local food pantries affiliated with Catholic Charities.  Last week he volunteered at St. Jerome’s pantry in the Bronx.

“It’s an astounding surge in need,” he said.

Read the full editorial in Catholic New York.