Posts Tagged ‘Archdiocese of New York’

Summer Retreat for Scholars — If You Call Volunteering a Retreat

Monday, August 11th, 2014

“It’s summer time when thoughts of most college-age students turn to kicking back at the beach,” reports Catholic New York in this recent article. But the archdiocese’s Pierre Toussaint Scholars decided instead to have a retreat the last weekend in June.

Photo by Leah T. Dixon

Pierre Toussaint scholars are graduating seniors from various schools in the Archdiocese of New York who demonstrate active involvement in a church or faith community. They also score high on academic achievement. And they demonstrate a commitment to serving others, similar to the scholars’ namesake, the Venerable Pierre Toussaint.

Mr. Toussaint was born a slave in Haiti in 1766 and died a freeman in New York City in 1853. He touched the hearts of many by living his life, he said, “to be an apostle of goodness to everyone he met.” He was instrumental in raising funds for the first Catholic orphanage, starting the city’s first school for black children, providing funds for the Oblate Sisters of Providence, (a religious community of black nuns), and raising funds to build the Old Saint Patrick’s Cathedral. With money he earned as successful entrepreneur he purchased the freedom of others instead of his own.

The retreat included a service component, in which the scholars decorated backpacks for Catholic Charities. The backpacks will be distributed to the children of refugees.

‘This is part of what makes me proud of this program,’ said Brother Tyrone Davis, C.F.C., executive director of the archdiocese’s Office of Black Ministry, ‘that we have some of our college students-leaders involved in Church and ministry and that they might continue to do so even after graduating.’

Read the full story in Catholic New York.

 

Cardinal Dolan Says Mass with Immigrant Children

Monday, August 4th, 2014


Check out this slide show

With unaccompanied minors serving as acolytes and filling the chapel, Cardinal Dolan celebrated mass on Sunday, August 3, at Catholic Charities affiliate Lincoln Hall.

These children who recently fled their homelands to escape violence and seek reunification with family members are finding safety at Lincoln Hall, a 19th-century mountain fortress whose history of protecting children alone and in need dates back to the orphans it took in during the Civil Wars

“Caring for the downtrodden, the outcast, the stranger among us, is part of our call as Catholics and we here in the Archdiocese of New York have been doing just that for more than 200 years,” Cardinal Dolan wrote in his recent blog post about the mass.

Every week, in cottages that dot a bluff at Lincoln Hall in Northern Westchester and in shelter facilities for unaccompanied youth across the area, Catholic Charities’ team of lawyers and paralegals encounters many of the thousands of children in the United States who have fled alone from abuse and violence in their homelands and who seek the comfort of a parent or loved one here.

“Pope Francis said it so well,” Cardinal Dolan wrote on his blog, “when he reminded us that ‘this humanitarian emergency requires, as a first urgent measure, these children be welcomed and protected.’

“And that is just what Catholic Charities, parishes, professionals and volunteers throughout the country are doing.”

Wonder What Cardinal Dolan Ponders in the Confessional?

Tuesday, May 27th, 2014

By Alice Kenny

Who can resist Sharon Otterman’s tease this weekend in The New York Times?

“If you ever wondered what Cardinal Dolan might ponder in the confessional,” she writes, “read on.”

Wonder about our New York Archbishop’s inner thoughts?

How has Pope Francis inspired him?

How does this impact our diocese’ focus — carried out through Catholic Charities — on the key issues of poverty, inequality, prison ministry and immigration?

Your questions are answered thanks to this in-depth Q and A with Cardinal Dolan published this weekend in The New York Times:

Q.

Are you, or is the diocese as a whole, increasing focus on issues such as poverty, inequality, prison ministry and immigration?

A.

I think what has happened is that Pope Francis has made it easier for us to be heard on these issues! He has inspired many people to think more about how we care for one another, especially the “least among us.” The bishops of this country have been a leading voice on immigration reform, for many years.

I get a lot of criticism that we bishops preach too much about the immigrant, the poor, the sick, the economy. These are all areas in which the Archdiocese of New York has always been enthusiastically involved…It’s my responsibility to carry that on, just as it is my responsibility to continue and expand our work in charity, education, health care. Yes, Francis inspires me in this regard, as he has inspired people everywhere. That’s a great gift he has given us.

For more than a century, Catholic Charities has helped solve the problems of New Yorkers in need – non-Catholics and Catholics alike. The homeless family, the prisoner and the immigrant are among those for whom we provide help and create hope. We rebuild lives and touch almost every human need promptly, locally, day in and day out, always with compassion and dignity. We help your neighbors as you would like to be helped if your family were in need.

 

Download a PDF version of Catholic Charities At-A-Glance  for a look at what we do in any given year for those in need.

Read the full interview with Cardinal Dolan in The New York Times.

 

 

 

 

 

Good Shepherd Services Middle-Schoolers Chat with Mayor de Blasio

Friday, March 21st, 2014

A group of 21 middle schoolers enrolled in Good Shepherd Services’ afterschool program, an affiliate of Catholic Charities, visited the inner sanctum of City Hall this week, sitting down with Mayor de Blasio and First Lady Chirlane McCray in the bullpen where senior staffers work, reported Annie Karni this week, Tuesday, March 18, 2014 in the New York Daily News.

 Mayor De Blasio spent 20 minutes quizzing the kids from Good Shepherd Services about the program.

 Good Shepherd Services serves more than 20,000 program participants annually.

 This Catholic Charities affiliated agency seeks to address the needs of children and youth growing up in some of the highest-poverty communities of New York City.

 It targets youth ages 0-25 who are disconnected or at risk of becoming disconnected and who are academically, economically and socially vulnerable, lacking the resources, ability to cope and interpersonal skills to make a successful transition to adulthood

 Read the full story in the New York  Daily News.

 Learn more about Good Shepherd Services.

A Call to Do Better as a City

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

Left to Right: Central Park South Skyline and The Auburn Family Residence Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

 

THE NEW YORK TIMES – THE OPINION PAGES | LETTER

MARCH 3, 2014

To the Editor:

Re “A Packed Forum for a Rising Concern: New Skyscrapers Near Central Park” (news article, Feb. 21) and “400 Children to Be Removed from 2 Shelters” (front page, Feb. 21):

In the eclectic way I look at the morning news, I read these two articles back to back. Two numbers caught my attention: From the first article, apartments selling for as much as $95 million; and from the second article, the cost of two homeless shelter upgrades, $13 million.

Something is seriously wrong with this picture. We cannot refrain from demanding that we do better as a city, as a country and as a world. I am not looking to assign blame, but the end result is just plain wrong. I am more interested in identifying those who are willing to be responsible to help right the situation.

We don’t and we won’t live in a perfect world, but we have to do better. As a first step, let’s just reverse the numbers: Cap the apartment at $13 million, and provide $95 million for shelter upgrades. At least then we’d be moving in the right direction.

 

Msgr. KEVIN SULLIVAN
Executive Director, Catholic Charities
Archdiocese of New York

 

CYO Shining Stars Honored in Staten Island

Wednesday, November 6th, 2013

By Alice Kenny

Seth Peloso, Dr. John P. Reilly, Diane Hesterhagen, Michael Coppotelli, Frank DeCandido, Frank Minotti and Ed Broderick pose at the Staten Island Catholic Charities event. (Staten Island Advance/Hilton Flores)

Catholic Charities Catholic Youth Organization (CYO) honored students from across Staten Island for their impact on their schools and communities.

At a brunch at the Hilton Garden Inn, Bloomfield, NY on Saturday, October 26, 40 youngsters were recognized with the Shining Star Youth Award.

Also honored were  Diane Hesterhagen, principal of St. Adalbert’s School in Port Richmond, and Michael Coppotelli, associate superintendent of schools.

CYO provides recreational, cultural and spiritual activities to the young people of the Archdiocese of New York.

Read the Staten Island Advance to learn more.

Catholic Renewal Raises Crucial Funds for Hungry New Yorkers

Thursday, September 12th, 2013
Catholic Renewal

Left: Mark McDermott, Jason Ridings, Alexander Ridings, Deirdre McGuiness, Corinne Ball, Brenda Adrian, Victoria Creason, Pat Nash. Monsignor Kevin Sullivan. (Right)

 

Catholic Renewal held its Third Annual Cocktail Reception at the Kirkland & Ellis Conference Center on Monday, September 9. The event, hosted by Kirkland & Ellis LLP and attended by His Eminence, Edward Cardinal Egan along with more than 250 attorneys and members of the corporate restructuring industry, raised more than $300,000 for Catholic Charities to feed the hungry throughout the Archdiocese of New York. Now, as one of five families with children in the 10 counties of the Archdiocese of New York does not have enough to eat, receiving a hot meal is key to their survival.

The reception honored Barry W. Ridings, Managing Director of Lazard Frères & Co. LLC and member of the Catholic Charities Board of Trustees, for his steadfast commitment to the Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York and its commitment to serve those in need. Mr. Ridings was unable to attend the event due to the unexpected loss of his mother. His sons, Jason and Alexander Ridings, accepted a tribute book on his behalf.

“Giving is very important to my father,” said Jason Ridings. “He has set an example for us to follow.”

Catholic Renewal founding member Mark McDermott of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom spoke about the inspiration that defines this group. Founded in 2010 during one of the nation’s worst economic downturns, Catholic Renewal is a group of Roman Catholic professionals in the corporate restructuring industry committed to building a community and network based on faith and service to provide charitable assistance to individuals and groups in need.

“The word ‘Renewal’ in our name, ‘Catholic Renewal,’ has a dual meaning,” explained Mr. McDermott. “It refers to what we do as restructuring professionals. As I never tire of repeating, we are privileged to be part of the only economic and legal system in the world that allows us to help troubled enterprises try to ‘renew’ themselves: to preserve value; to obtain a fresh start; to preserve jobs.”

Catholic Renewal expressed its deep appreciation for its lead sponsors at the event. These include Ann and Barry W. Ridings, Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson, LLP, Jones Day, Kirkland & Ellis LLP, Lathan & Watkins LLP, Marotta Gund Budd & Dzera, LLC, and Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom. Brenda Adrian, Victoria Creason and Deirdre McGuiness served as chairpersons for this event.

“We don’t live in a tale of two cities, but rather one city where people who have a little or a lot more help those who have who have a little or a lot less,” stated Executive Director Msgr. Kevin Sullivan of Catholic Charities. “We greatly appreciate these generous gifts that create hope and Catholic Renewal’s dedication to serve individuals regardless of their religion, everyday, always with dignity and compassion.”

World Youth Day 2013

Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

By Alice Kenny

News media from around the world are reporting this week on Pope Francis and his first trip back to South America to celebrate World Youth Day 2013 in Rio de Janeiro. More than 2.5 million Catholics and others are joining the celebration.

At this global event that occurs every two or three years, young members of the faithful gather together in prayer to meet the Pope and to celebrate and renew their faith.

At Catholic Charities, we know that all children deserve the opportunity to develop social skills, gain confidence and develop lasting values that will serve them as adults. Our network of services aims to address the physical, emotional and psychological needs of children and their families.

At Catholic Charities, in any given year:

  • 382 children  are adopted by loving families
  • 1,564 children enjoying summer camps
  • 6,066 children and teens are placed in safe foster care
  • 23,914 youth participate in wholesome sports
  • 7,254 children growing and learning in day-care
  • 4,628 youth participating in sound after-school programs

Listen as Cynthia Martinez from the Catholic Youth Ministry of the Archdiocese of New York speaks about World Youth Day with Msgr. Kevin Sullivan on JustLove on SIRIUS XM Satellite Radio. JustLove airs weekly on Saturday at 10am EST on The Catholic Channel 129.

Are you making a pilgrimage to Brazil for World Youth Day? We would love to hear your story. Comment below.

Catholic Charities Gala Benefit: Creating Partnerships Among New Yorkers

Friday, May 24th, 2013

L-R: Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, Pat Battle, Timothy Michael Cardinal Dolan, Eugene M. McQuade, Stephen J. Brogan and Catherine Kinney

May 24, 2013, New York, NY – His Eminence Timothy Michael Cardinal Dolan and the Board of Trustees of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York honored Eugene M. McQuade, Chief Executive Officer, Citibank and Stephen J. Brogan, Managing Partner, Jones Day at its Gala Benefit at The Waldorf-Astoria in New York City yesterday, May 23, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. 

“The Catholic Charities Annual Gala permits us to create stronger partnerships among New Yorkers,” stated Executive Director Msgr. Kevin Sullivan. “Our outstanding honorees, their colleagues and friends along with generous Catholic Charities donors come together to ensure that New Yorkers in need – non-Catholics and Catholics alike – are helped with meeting basic human needs so that they might live their lives in greater dignity.”

This signature black tie dinner convened a dynamic group of New Yorkers from the worlds of business, philanthropy, culture, fashion, law, media, politics and religion who share a deep concern for the well-being of our fellow New Yorkers in need. It raised close to $2.3 million.

Pat Battle, anchor for NBC 4 New York, served as Mistress of Ceremonies. Award-winning actress, singer and recording artist Liz Calloway, who held leading roles in several Broadway productions including Miss Saigon and Cats, performed live.

Over the course of a career spanning more than three decades, honoree Eugene M. McQuade distinguished himself as a business and industry leader. Before joining Citi as Chief Executive Officer of Citibank in 2009, he served as Vice Chairman and President of Merrill Lynch Banks (U.S.) and previously had been President at Freddie Mac, Bank of America and Fleet Boston Financial. He is a Trustee to the Boys & Girls Clubs of America and the American Ireland Fund.

“Tonight is a celebration of the terrific work Catholic Charities does every year to ensure that our neediest New Yorkers, regardless of faith, get the support they need to improve their lives,” said Mr. McQuade. “I’m gratified and humbled to be recognized, but tonight is about shining a spotlight on the enormous positive impact Catholic Charities has on our city.”

Fellow honoree Stephen J. Brogan, Managing Partner of Jones Day since 2002, began his career with the firm while still a student at Notre Dame Law School. He worked as Deputy Assistant Attorney General at the U.S. Department of Justice from 1981-1983. He serves as Chair of the Academic and Faculty Affairs Committee of the Board of Trustees of the University of Notre Dame. He is also a member of the Board of Trustees of the Cleveland Clinic.

“The long history of Catholic Charities’ dedicated and selfless service to people in need in the City of New York is a very important manifestation of the Catholic Church’s commitment to social justice and to the care of the less fortunate,” said Mr. Brogan.

About Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York
Catholic Charities, a federation of approximately 90 agencies and programs located throughout the 10 counties of the Archdiocese of New York, helps solve the problems of New Yorkers in need – non-Catholics and Catholics alike – with services that protect and nurture children, resolve family crises, assist the hungry and homeless, support the physically and emotionally challenged, and integrate immigrants and refugees. For more information on how to donate or volunteer, please visit our website at www.catholiccharitiesny.org.

Fidelis Care Provides Grant to Help Serve Needy New Yorkers

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

From Left to Right: George Rodriguez, Fidelis Care NY Director of Marketing; Mark Sclafani, Vice President, Marketing; Pamela Hassan, Chief Marketing Officer; Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, Catholic Charities Executive Director; Beatriz Diaz Taveras, Executive Director CCCS

By Alice Kenny

Fidelis Care, a partner with Catholic Charities Community Services (CCCS) for nearly a decade, donated $509,000 to Catholic Charities on May 3, 2013 to further the two agencies’ aligned mission to serve the poor and needy of New York.

This partnership has proved particularly important in light of the punishing impact the lasting effects the economic recession and deep cuts in social service programs have had on families in need.

  • One in every six New Yorkers – 1.4 million of our neighbors – now relies on daily emergency food.
  • More than half are employed yet still cannot manage to make ends meet with their earnings.  Close to 9,700 families with 15,000 children sleep in homeless shelters.

These numbers indicate what Catholic Charities already knows.  Poverty is not merely the lack of adequate financial resources.  Instead, it entails a profound deprivation, a denial of full participation in the economic, social and political life of society and an inability to influence decisions that affect one’s own life.  It means being powerless in a way that assaults not only one’s pocketbook but also one’s fundamental human dignity.

Fidelis Care is the New York State Catholic Health Plan, providing health coverage to children and adults in 58 counties statewide. The mission of Fidelis Care is to ensure that every resident, regardless of income, age, religion, gender, or ethnic background, has access to quality health care and is provided with dignity and respect. Through partnerships with providers, schools, and community agencies like Catholic Charities New York, Fidelis Care works to foster healthier futures for members and their families.

Now as more and more individuals and families seek help, the Fidelis Care grant assists Catholic Charities Community Services as we continue to respond as we always have, with professional case management services across the ten counties of the Archdiocese of New York that alleviate crises and set families and individuals on a path toward stability.