Posts Tagged ‘Catholic Charities’

Immigration Reform: The Good of Our Country Demands Our Commitment

Friday, April 19th, 2013

Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, Executive Director of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York, representing Timothy Cardinal Dolan, shook hands with Senator Chuck Schumer at the formal presentation of the bi-partisan Senate bill on comprehensive immigration reform at the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Thursday April 18, 2013.

“The presence of so many diverse groups at the introduction of this bi-partisan bill shows that immigration reform is not about narrow self-interest, but the common good of the nation,”  Msgr. Sullivan said.

“The Catholic Church, and in a particular way Catholic Charities, partners with many to promote just policies and provide compassionate services that enable our neighbors to live in dignity as made in God’s image.  We understand there are different opinions on this important issue.  We will listen, and talk together to move forward to reform our broken immigration system. The good of our country and of individual neighbors and their families demand our commitment. ”

 

Looking for information about Comprehensive Immigration Reform?

Catholic Charities is here to help.

Contact us now.

Call Catholic Charities at New York State New Americans Hotline: 1-800-566-7636

Youth Competition Garners 7,000 Meals for Hungry New Yorkers

Thursday, April 11th, 2013

 By Alice Kenny

Thanks to a contest that pitted youth against youth and parish against parish, Catholic Charities in partnership with the Office of Youth Ministry pulled together an additional 7,000 meals for hungry New Yorkers at Catholic Youth Day on April 6 at the College of Mt. St. Vincent in Riverdale.

Holy Rosary Parish of Portchester won first place by bringing in cartons packed with 460 pounds of food.  All told, the contest yielded close to 1300 pounds of food donations.

Holy Rosary’s win entitles them to a day with Fr. Joseph Espaillat, director of youth ministry for the Archdiocese of New York.  He will personally visit their parish or youth group and preach, lead a retreat, celebrate Mass, play kickball, and, if they like, throw a pizza party for parish youth.

Catholic Charities provided staff and support for the Office of Youth Ministry contest to help feed our hungry neighbors. The Youth Day event featured music and performances by different ministries in the Archdiocese of New York including Full Armor Band, Fr. Stan Fortuna, CFR and many more.

The contest was part of the Feeding Our Neighbors campaign to help pantries feed those who would otherwise go hungry.  Feeding Our Neighbors is an interfaith effort to fight hunger by replenishing dwindling supplies in emergency food programs that continue to be stretched thin.

During this time of great need, one in five New York State children grow up in poverty and more than one million New Yorkers do not have enough to eat. This campaign grows out of an awareness and concern that embraces New Yorkers of all religions who must turn to food pantries, soup kitchens and senior center meal programs, to sustain them and their families.

The food donations were delivered to St. Peter’s Parish food pantry in Yonkers, NY. Pound for pound and dollar for dollar, the donations represent an additional 1,040 meals for hungry children and families served by this pantry plus collections at masses that raised $1500 to support 6,000 more meals in the Archdiocese of New York.

Join us in feeding our neighbors.

Do your part to make sure no hungry neighbor is turned away.

GOVERNOR CUOMO ANNOUNCES $38.5 MILLION SERVICE PROGRAM TO HELP VICTIMS OF SUPERSTORM SANDY

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013
For Immediate Release: April 3, 2013

Residents in NYC and Nassau, Suffolk, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Sullivan, Ulster, and Westchester Counties Will Receive One-Stop-Shop Assistance for Sandy-Related Resources

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced a $38.5 million program that New York State will oversee in conjunction with Catholic Charities that will provide over 200 service coordinators to assist individuals and families affected by Superstorm Sandy recover and access essential resources. The Disaster Case Management Program (DCMP) provides supplemental federal funding to states, U.S. Territories, and federally recognized Tribes after a Presidential disaster declaration that includes Individual Assistance.

The DCMP provides funding for a partnership between a disaster case manager and a disaster survivor to develop and carry out a Disaster Recovery Plan. This partnership provides the survivor with a single point of contact to access a broad range of resources. The process involves an assessment of the survivor’s verified disaster-caused unmet needs, development of a goal-oriented plan that outlines the steps necessary to achieve recovery, organization and coordination of information on available resources that match the disaster-caused needs, and the monitoring of progress toward reaching the recovery plan goals, and, when necessary, survivor advocacy.

“As recovery from Sandy continues, we’re entering a critical phase where direct one-on-one service will provide survivors with the assistance they need to get their lives back in order,” said Governor Cuomo. “The Disaster Case Management Program covers every facet of recovery assistance needed by individuals and families to ensure that those hit hard by the storm have their needs addressed efficiently and effectively. Working with partners like Catholic Charities, we will bring more resources directly to the people who need help the most.”

“Hurricane Sandy was absolutely devastating, physically and emotionally,” said Monsignor Kevin Sullivan, Executive Director of Catholic Charities. “The state, city and surrounding counties have done a remarkable job making assistance available to those impacted by this storm, but sometimes those affected can be overwhelmed by what it takes to get back on their feet. Having a single point of contact to explain the breadth of services and help navigate the system can be a tremendous help to individuals and families trying to recover from Sandy’s devastation. Approximately 200 case managers will be a portal of help and hope for those impacted as they begin to rebuild their homes and lives.”

DCMP coordinators, who will be stationed at locations in the 13 hardest-hit counties, can be a lifeline for people coping with Superstorm Sandy’s devastation, but who may be unfamiliar with the range of services currently being offered by local, State and Federal government.

Service coordinators are both advocates and expediters for those affected by Sandy. They first assess if clients have unmet needs related to the storm. If people qualify, they will be assigned a disaster case manager to serve as a single point of contact for all government- and insurance-related assistance. Then, based on interactions with the client, the service coordinators create individualized disaster recovery plans, including advocating for access to needed services, coordinating benefits, and making referrals for services outside the scope of disaster case management. Existing Sandy-related services for individuals and families range from direct federal and state grants and Small Business Association loans to insurance advocacy and referrals to the range of not-for-profit and voluntary programs that have been established.

The Superstorm Sandy DCMP is modeled after a similar program run by Catholic Charities in 34 counties across New York State following Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee in 2011. For Sandy assistance, Catholic Charities will either provide the service coordinators directly, or sub-contract them out to locally-based not-for-profit agencies that have demonstrated experience with this type of work, such as the Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty, Good Shepherd Services, Lutheran Social Service and the Center for Independence of the Disabled. Catholic Charities will also subcontract to several organizations, such as the Greater Chinatown Community Association and El Centro del Immigrante, which can provide these services in additional languages so that no New York community gets left behind.

Eligibility is open to anyone with an unmet need that arose from or was exacerbated by Superstorm Sandy, even those who have not applied to FEMA for assistance. Those impacted by the storm can call 1-855-258-0483 to find out the location and contact information for their nearest service provider. A full list can also be found online atwww.catholiccharitiesny.org.

The State anticipates that more than 10,000 people will take advantage of this service. Already, more than 250,000 New York residents have applied to FEMA for disaster-related services following Sandy. According to FEMA, in past disasters, roughly 5% of FEMA applicants take advantage of disaster case management services.

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Additional news available at www.governor.ny.gov


New York State | Executive Chamber | press.office@exec.ny.gov | 518.474.8418

Electrocuted During Hurricane Sandy, Survivor Struggles to Recover

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013

 By Alice Kenny

Leaning on his black cane, Fujimoto Takashi, 64, struggles to pronounce words that convey the terror he felt the afternoon his basement apartment in Midland Beach, Staten Island, morphed into a whirlpool of chairs, refrigerator, motion and mementos.

Born in Hiroshima four years after the atom bomb was dropped there, Mr. Takashi already knew devastation first hand.  He grew up believing, he said, that if he could make his way to the United States he would find a safe place to thrive.

For a long time, his plan seemed to work.  Mr. Takashi moved to California in 1977.  He developed a career as a photographer.  And he later made his home in Staten Island.

Never did he suspect, he said, that a disaster spurred by nature and not by man would nearly kill him. But when Hurricane Sandy tore through Staten Island, the subsequent flooding inside his basement apartment electrocuted and nearly drowned him.  It destroyed his health, his home and his means of making a living.

“Growing up in Hiroshima I helped other people and felt their pain; now others are feeling my pain,” Mr. Takashi said.  “Catholic Charities gave me the encouragement I needed to not give up.”

Monday, October 29, began like most days, Mr. Takashi said.  He was fixing a camera light plugged into the wall of in his Andrews Street apartment.

Suddenly he noticed water pouring in under his front door.  He grabbed for the camera light plug.

But it was too late.  Electrical currents bore through his right calf.  They shot in one end, out the other and left a hole as their memento.   He suffered a stroke, he recalled, then passed out.

He awoke to the taste of salt water, bouncing on furniture that floated five feet above the floor.  His right arm and leg no longer functioned.

“Help me!” Fuji shouted.

Hurricane winds and neighbors’ panic smothered his screams.  Night came and went. Fifteen hours passed.  Water receded.  His energy waned.

Finally, at 10:30 the following morning, his landlord knocked on his door.

Much of what happened next is blur, he said.  An ambulance rushed him to some hospital – he can’t remember which.  Later he was transferred to Staten Island University Hospital. For 38 days doctors treated burns that covered much of his body and physical and mental repercussions from his stroke.  Finally, he was transferred to Golden Gate Nursing Home where therapists began teaching him how to walk again.

After two months in a hospital and rehabilitation center, he was released to go home.

But everything had changed.  Hurricane Sandy stole much of his memory and mobility.  It destroyed his photographic equipment, stealing his livelihood.  And it tore apart his home, leaving his furniture, clothing – all he owned – rotting and covered with mold.

“When I came back home I had nothing,” Mr. Takashi said.

His landlord gave him a blanket and an air mattress.  But the mattress leaked.

“It was like sleeping on the floor,” Fuji added.

Fortunately, an associate of Fuji’s learned of his plight and called Catholic Charities for help.

Catholic Charities Staten Island has taken a leadership role in partnering with nonprofit organizations to speed services and support to residents of this borough devastated by Hurricane Sandy.  From disaster-response professionals who visit parishes to deliver information and resources, to volunteers who collect and distribute food and supplies, to neighbors checking in on neighbors, the entire Catholic Charities community responded, providing help, creating hope and rebuilding lives.

Since Mr. Takashi’s stroke left him wheelchair bound and confused, Catholic Charities Case Manager Marvin Walker visited him in his home.  Mr. Walker helped Mr. Takashi apply successfully for a variety of grants and subsidies including new furniture from Project Hospitality, appliances from the Staten Island Back to Basics initiative, gift cards to cover necessities from the Siller Foundation, help paying heating bills from the federal Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP), food stamps from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and disaster recovery financial assistance from FEMA.  He helped Mr. Takashi apply for Access-a-Ride, bus rides catered for persons with disabilities.  And he gave Mr. Takashi food from Catholic Charities food pantries along with clothing, pots, pans, utensils and other household necessities.

Meanwhile, Catholic Charities Volunteer Services paired Fuji up with Catholic Charities Anderson Avenue Senior Director Marni Caruso.  She volunteered to drive Mr. Takashi during her personal time to medical appointments and meetings with the numerous government agencies that suddenly play a large role in his life.

Fuji’s road to recovery remains long and difficult.  He has progressed from wheelchair to walker to cane.  Many memories remain hazy.  His finances remain tight.

“I never thought I would have to depend on others,” Fuji says.  “But without Catholic Charities I couldn’t have survived.”

Thrift Store Closing Sale: Everything Must Go!

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

By Alice Kenny

The Thrift Store is closing its doors on Wednesday, March 27.

That means deep discounts and deals galore.

 Where?

Catholic Charities Community Services Thrift Store
402 East 152nd Street, Bronx, NY 10455

When?

Store Hours 
Monday-Thursday 9am to 3pm
Friday & Saturday 9am to 5pm

Heads Up:  Fixtures, displays and supplies will still be available for sale after closing day.

 

Shop Online Anytime! Click on links below:

Shop CCCS Etsy Thrift Store Shop CCCS Ruby Lane Thrift Store Shop on CCCS Amazon thrift store Shop on CCCS eBay Thrift Store

Donate your vehicle: www.catholiccharitiesny.org/donateyourvehicle

Comments & Questions: cccsthriftstore@archny.org

College Fair Opens Teens’ Minds to New Dreams

Friday, February 15th, 2013

 By Alice Kenny

Hundreds of students and nearly 30 colleges and universities participated last week in the second-annual college fair hosted by Catholic Charities’ Alianza Division in collaboration with the High School for Media and Communications.

The event, held on the School for Media and Communications’ campus in Washington Heights, promoted Catholic Charities’ Alianza Division’s mission to help children, youth and families break the cycle of poverty and fulfill their potential as members of the global community.

The college fair was important, said Elizabeth Payero, Program Coordinator for the Division’s High School for Media and Communications, because it gave students throughout the campus the opportunity to gather information needed to make informed decisions about which schools they should focus on and where they should apply.

Representatives from numerous colleges – including Ivy League schools such as Harvard – along with CUNY’s, SUNY’s, UConn, the University of Bridgeport and private universities attended the fair.

Many students applied at the fair for coveted college positions.  The College of St. Rose accepted seven students on the spot.

“Participating in the college fair allowed me to open my mind to new dreams,” said high school junior Lisandy Rodriguez.

Enter Our Random Act of Kindness Competition — Win a Surprise Gift.

Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

By Alice Kenny

Did you smile at a stranger today? Buy flowers for a friend? Help a child with homework?

Tell us about your random act of kindness and you could win a free gift from Catholic Charities.

Nervous about the Nor’easter? Catholic Charities Is Here to Help.

Friday, February 8th, 2013

By Alice Kenny

Whether it is Superstorm Sandy, Hurricane Irene, Tropical Storm Lee or now, the impending nor’easter, Catholic Charities is here to help.

Day in and day out, Catholic Charities provides a vast range of programs and services for those struggling with long-term needs or confronting sudden disaster. Our federation of agencies offers a variety of specialized assistance designed to meet individual needs, non-Catholics and Catholics alike.

Looking for help?

 

Tragedy, Poverty and Oppression Tear Immigrant Families Apart

Thursday, February 7th, 2013

By Alice Kenny

Looking for help reuniting with your family? Catholic Charities helps immigrants and refugees reunite with family members in two ways: through the legal immigration process, and through the refugee resettlement process. In both programs, highly skilled staff helps navigate the complicated rules and applications required by the U.S. government for family members to enter the United States.

Click here to find a Catholic Charities agency that can help.

Call Catholic Charities at the New York State New Americans Hotline: 212-419-3737 or 1-800-566-7636 (toll-free in NYS).

Looking for help with other needs?  Call the Catholic Charities Help line at: 888-744-7900.