Posts Tagged ‘community’

Everyone Talks About How Children are Hungry; Find Out How We Walk the Walk

Thursday, October 31st, 2013

By Alice Kenny

One  out of four children do not get enough to eat, reports Feeding America.  Hunger is growing in New York City.

Catholic Charities Feeding Our Neighbors campaign is fighting back, partnering with parishes, schools, organizations and individuals to restock food pantries and feed those in need

Last week, Epiphany School students, staff, faculty and board of trustee members delivered enough food to feed 5,000 families.  Located in Manhattan, the school accumulated this significant donation through Epiphany’s Walk the Walk Catholic Charities Feeding Our Neighbors food drive campaign on October 20.  At the event, 350 families joined in a 2.5-mile walk along the East River Promenade to raise funds.

And while hunger, unfortunately, is growing, our commitment to fight it has grown as well.  Last year, the Walk collected food which resulted in 4,000 meals.  This year, the Walk increased its collection by over 25%.

There is just one goal for Feeding Our Neighbors, that New Yorkers answer the call to feed those who are suffering in our community.

See a full list of pantries and soup kitchens supported.


Please help us feed our neighbors.

Walk the Walk with Us to Feed Our Neighbors

Friday, October 11th, 2013

The Epiphany School’s Walk and Catholic Charities Feeding Our Neighbors food drive campaign are on a combined mission to strengthen the community while continuing to sustain excellence in Catholic education.

This October 20th marks our 2nd annual participation with the Epiphany School in their “Walk the Walk” event.  There is just one goal for Feeding Our Neighbors: that New Yorkers answer the call to feed those who are suffering in our community.

Feeding Our Neighbors is a united effort to fight hunger.

This campaign is a response to Timothy Cardinal Dolan’s call that we all do our part to replenish the food pantries and soup kitchens in our community that so many families in our community rely on to survive.

Sponsored by Catholic organizations throughout the Archdiocese of New York and managed by Catholic Charities, 100% of contributions to the campaign will support local food pantries that serve New Yorkers, non-Catholics and Catholics alike.

Please join us as we Walk the Walk.

Click here to learn more.

HELP FEED THE HUNGRY!

North Bronx Social Service Agency is More Than Just

Wednesday, August 14th, 2013

By Ben Ros

One Bronx nonprofit, a sponsored ministry of the Sisters of Charity, continues to make the news. Here it is, in case you missed it on PBS’s Metrofocus.

Part of the Solution (POTS) opened in 1982 as a standard soup kitchen but has since expanded their scope of services to provide not only food through their restaurant-style community dining room and food pantry, but increasingly, everything the homeless or working poor need. Their services range from case management and legal advice to hot showers, haircuts, clothing, and a mailing address.

The diversity of services offered stems from a holistic philosophy that is central to the community values that POTS fosters. For those starting from zero, some of these basic services make all the difference. The simple chance to sit down in the barber’s chair and tell your story, or be recognized by your postman can inspire the courage and confidence it takes to work through hard times.

POTS’s true value to those it serves is being a safe, judgment-free space to fulfill one’s basic needs while respecting individuals’ dignity. “Personal dignity is really the one quality that I think people need to take each next progressive step in their life,” said Chris Bean, Executive Director of POTS, a sentiment that parallels one of the central doctrines of the catechism.

To learn more about POTS and how you can help, visit potsbronx.org.

Riding Leprechaun Buses; Running for Team Catholic Charities

Wednesday, August 7th, 2013

By Ed Gallagher

Many lives have been forever changed and even destroyed by Hurricane Sandy and the terrorist attack at the Boston Marathon. It heightened my resolve to live life more fully and not procrastinate on my dreams and goals. These two devastating events, one natural, one man made, exemplified the dichotomy of life:  Life is truly fragile, but it is also amazingly resilient for those that survive.

I have never run a marathon, but it has always been on my “bucket list”. I figured I’d better do it sooner than later as I know it won’t get any easier as each year passes.

I grew up as a competitive swimmer, starting at age 5. I started running cross country in high school to get in shape for the winter swim season. I instantly fell in love with many aspects of running; the challenge both mental and physical, the solitude of training and camaraderie of race day. It gives me time to think about issues at work and home, put life into perspective and be a better husband, father, friend and employer.

I stopped running for many years as I got involved with family business and started a family. I am president of The Leprechaun Transportation Group, a small group of passenger transportation companies providing school bus, transit, commuter and charter motor coach service in the Hudson Valley and beyond. It is a third-generation family-owned enterprise started by my grandfather in 1934. My hope is that it becomes a fourth-generation family business.

My wife, Mary Jane, and I live with our four children; Katie, 15, Caroline 14, Eddie, 12, and Joseph, 9, in Montgomery, NY.  We are members of Most Precious Blood parish and our kids have attended this parish school.

I began running again a few years ago to be able to keep up with my kids, lose my “spare tire” and be fit mentally and physically.

Meanwhile, several years ago Sr. Joann Dress, CEO of Catholic Charities Community Services of Orange County, approached me to become a board member. I agreed with little understanding of the full extent of their work.  From day one, I have been thoroughly impressed with the board’s and staff’s dedication, passion, focus and operational efficiencies of this organization. They touch so many lives in this community.  You can’t help but be drawn to help with their mission.

Running as a member of Team Catholic Charities allows me to fulfill a personal goal while also fulfilling a charitable goal.

I truly appreciate this opportunity.

Help support Ed’s ING NYC Marathon campaign. Click here to find out how: www.crowdrise.com/CatholicCharitiesNYC2013/fundraiser/edgallagher

Going door to door, tent to shed, to serve those still suffering from Superstorm Sandy.

Friday, July 26th, 2013

By Alice Kenny

Although nine months have passed since Hurricane Sandy pushed ocean waves down the streets of Staten Island’s Midland Beach, upending cars, flooding homes and destroying nearly everything in its wake, some residents of this seaside community still live in makeshift tents and sheds.  Some even sleep on park benches.

Many still need assistance with basic needs such as food and shelter. This includes children, the elderly, and new immigrants. Nine months into this disaster and many believe they have nowhere to turn for help.

A number of local volunteer organizations have been created or expanded to address these needs. “Every night a volunteer goes out in search of those still in need of a meal and a place to sleep,” says Catholic Charities Community Development Coordinator Lourdes Ferrer.

Over three hundred Sandy survivors already receive support from Catholic Charities disaster case managers stationed at Catholic Charities’ office at 120 Anderson Avenue in Staten Island. But rather than just waiting for Sandy survivors to come to Catholic Charities, disaster case managers also go to them.

Catholic Charities manages the New York State Disaster Case Management Program. Designed to streamline support and avoid frustration and confusion, the Disaster Case Management program whittles down the complex system of disaster support by providing survivors with a single point of contact to access a broad range of resources. This allows people still reeling from the loss of jobs and homes to avoid the need to search out multiple organizations that might respond to their various needs. Instead, survivors can relate their experiences and submit their documentation to a single, local disaster case manager who guides them through the recovery process.

Many residents of Staten Island never before had to ask for social service help and were unsure of the value of these services.  They initially hoped they could do everything themselves.

So Catholic Charities teamed up with local “hubs,” ad hoc service centers that sprang up in neighborhoods hit hardest by the hurricane to provide food, water, clothing, supplies and services, educate the community and reach more of those in need.   Case managers from Catholic Charities now help staff the Staten Island Alliance office on Colony Ave, enrolling many new clients into the program and meeting with existing clients.  Case managers are also able to meet with clients in their homes.  To extend these services, Catholic Charities disaster case managers are preparing to staff another hub in the New Dorp neighborhood in Staten Island. By meeting staff at home, in local hubs and Catholic Charities offices, hurricane survivors can feel comfortable in familiar surroundings close to home among people they know.

“People think that because so many months have passed, that everything is back to ‘normal’,” Lourdes said. “But the reality is there are communities in Staten Island that are still recovering and struggling to accept the new ‘normal’.”

Calling all budding track stars

Friday, April 19th, 2013

 

By Alice Kenny

From the Pee Wee Dash to the Boys Long Jump, children representing eight parish teams competed in the first Developmental Track Meet of season on Sunday, April 14.  Two dozen “CYO unattached” runners (CYO children in parishes currently not fielding a track team) joined 225 CYO members on – finally — this perfect, sunny spring day.

They raced and received medals at the top-tier facility Mount St Michael Academy in the Bronx.

CYO has been working hard to provide a great experience for the children of the CYO Track & Field Community. With the addition of clinics with Olympic Athletes and new meets and events in some of the metropolitan region’s top facilities, CYO hopes to build upon the momentum gained over the past year.

Registration is now open for the April 21 CYO Developmental Clinic and Track Meet.  It will be held at Mt. Saint Michael Academy, 4300 Murdock Ave., Bronx, NY  10466.

The Iona College track team will be offering a pre-meet clinic for CYO athletes starting at 12:30 pm.

(Use this registration if your parish does not have a track program but you are a member of a parish or school, grades K-8 of the Archdiocese of NY)

(Use this registration link if you are the team coach or parish coordinator.

Registration is done on ny.milesplit.com . This is open for ALL CYO Programs.)

Harlem Mother Fights Back After Losing Two Sons to Gun Violence

Wednesday, February 27th, 2013

 By Alice Kenny

February is the toughest month, Jackie Rowe-Adams tells Msgr. Kevin Sullivan during their conversation aired on JustLove on February 23.  Her two sons were shot dead in Harlem, one 15 years ago, one 30 years ago and both in February.  They died for no good reason, just crazy gun violence.

“Who’s giving our kids all these guns?” she asks.  “We have to take charge, take back our kids, take back our community.”

To fight back, Ms.  Rowe-Adams co-founded Harlem Mothers S.A.V.E. (Stop Another Violent Act) in 2006.

The group meets regularly at Catholic Charities Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Memorial Community Center in Harlem.

Ms. Rowe-Adams confronted National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre at the group’s convention in April, she told Msgr. Sullivan, and heard back from him this month after the Newtown, Connecticut elementary school shooting.

Listen to JustLove, the Catholic Channel, to learn more about how Harlem mothers are fighting gun violence and the support they receive from Catholic Charities.

JustLove airs weekly on Saturday at 10 am EST on SIRIUS XM Satellite Radio on The Catholic Channel 129.

Partnership Forged between Westchester County and Faith-Based Organizations

Tuesday, January 22nd, 2013

Karen Reynolds – front row, right – represents Catholic Charities.

By Alice Kenny

Karen Reynolds, Catholic Charities regional supervisor for Westchester County, represented Catholic Charities when County Executive Robert P. Astorino announced on Wednesday, January 16, the appointment of a liaison for faith-based organizations in the county, part of a community partnership that he hopes will help clergy and their affiliated organizations cut through government red tape and share information.

“Helping the neediest among us is greatly enhanced by strengthening the bonds between county government and religious organizations in our community,” Astorino said.

Find out more.