Posts Tagged ‘Dominican Republic’

Family Man Angel Rojas Gunned Down on Bus Ride Home from Work

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

DEBBIE EGAN-CHIN/NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

The last thing Angel Rojas said to his mother was “hello,” reports the New York Daily News today, March 24, 2014.

Angel Rojas, the 39-year-old father who was shot dead by a gangbanger on the B15 bus in Brooklyn Thursday, was calling his mom on his way home from work that night as he always did.

… Then the phone went dead.

Kahton Anderson, 14, who aimed his .357-Magnum pistol at a rival gang member but missed, instead accidentally shooting Rojas, was charged with second-degree murder.

Left behind are Mr. Rojas’ widow, Maria Lopez, and their children, April, 8, and Saury, 12.

An immigrant from the Dominican Republic, Mr. Rojas was working two jobs to support his family.

With Mr. Rojas gone, his widow said she can no longer afford their modest, second-floor Brownsville apartment on the meager pay she earns as a part-time home attendant.

Catholic Charities Executive Director Msgr. Kevin Sullivan attended Mr. Rojas’ wake at Ponce Funeral Home in Brooklyn yesterday.

As the Daily News reports, you can help the family by sending a check to Catholic Charities, 1011 First Ave., New York, NY 10022.

Online donations can be made at CatholicCharitiesny.org.

So far, the fund has raised more than $6,600, including two donations by phone for $1,000 each. A total of 52 people have donated so far.

Learn more about the Rojas family in this Daily News video.

One-Legged Dad & Deaf Son Refuse to Let Disabilities Define Them

Tuesday, January 7th, 2014

By Alice Kenny

Jose Arias did not curse fate when, at age 7, a car side swiped the car where he sat on a road in his native Dominican Republic and tore off his entire right leg. And he did not curse fate when his four-year-old son was diagnosed as deaf.

Instead he took any job he could get from cleaning cars to painting houses in Puerto Rico.  He and his son received legal U.S. permanent residence there nearly 20 years ago.

He also did all he could to help his son work hard as he did to overcome his own disability.  During school semesters, he sent the younger Jose to a school for the deaf in their native Dominican Republic because the school offered him a scholarship and a superior education than similar schools in Puerto Rico.  And during holidays and the summer months, he reinforced with his son the value of working hard to move beyond their life of poverty.

But when the U.S immigration authorities incorrectly took away young Jose’s green card in July 2011, Mr. Arias and his son did not accept this as fate.  Instead, for more than two years they fought back, hobbling from street to street and office to office speaking in Spanish, broken English and sign language to reverse this erroneous immigration decision.

Finally, thanks to free legal support supplied by Catholic Charities, an immigration judge completely reversed the flawed 2011 decision on October 24, 2013.  Now that Jose del Carmen is acknowledged once again as a lawful permanent U.S. resident he plans to complete studies to become a computer technician and land a job that will enable him to support his father as well.

Read their story in The New York Times.