Posts Tagged ‘feeding our neighbors’

How Do We Hope to Provide One Million Meals?

Wednesday, January 21st, 2015

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By Alice Kenny

Shop for your family at ShopRite and help feed your hungry neighbors at the same time.

Sounds like an ad, right?  But it’s not.

In New York State, nearly one million children go to bed hungry. And we’re working with you, ShopRite, and other partners to pull together one million meals to feed them.

Catholic Charities and ShopRite are teaming up to help raise money and non-perishable food for area food pantries left with dwindling supplies after the holiday season, the Times-Herald Record reports in a video announcing the campaign’s kickoff.

It’s a time of year when need remains high but giving does not.

So by shopping at any one of 26 area ShopRite stores in the Hudson Valley, you can make cash or food donations to help replenish dwindling supplies.

The collection of food and funds in ShopRite stores will run from Sunday, January 25 through Saturday, February 7.

“This Catholic Charities Feeding Our Neighbors Campaign in partnership with ShopRite,” Msgr. Sullivan says in this new video, “is an effort on our part to make sure fewer children go to bed hungry.”

Watch the Times-Herald Record video.

Join us in Feeding Our Neighbors.

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Food Banks Receive Huge Boost

Monday, January 12th, 2015

Food banks in New York City received a huge boost in donations Sunday, January 11, 2014 to help hungry families across the five boroughs, reports CBS News.

As TV 10/55’s Ilana Gold reported in this news summary, more than 5,000 pounds of donated food sitting in boxes and bags outside St. Patrick’s Cathedral will go to three major interfaith organizations in the city.

 The organizations will then deliver the donations to dozens of food pantries, soup kitchens and meal programs across the city.

 “Is there anything better than feeding our neighbor?” Cardinal Dolan said.

 Dolan showed his support by lending a helping hand.

“This is not only a nice idea, this is a sacred responsibility,” he said.

Sunday’s effort kicked off a campaign in New York City called Feeding Our Neighbors, which will run through Feb. 1st.

The goal of the campaign is to gather enough food to feed 1 million people across New York City.

But the work of these charities won’t stop here. Leaders are pushing for more donations year-round.

“When you’re talking about 300,000 kids alone that are hungry in the greater New York area every day, we need more,” Dolan said.

Watch TV 1055’s video of the event.

For more event coverage, Check out MYFOXNY below:

Cardinal Timothy Dolan, Archbishop of New York joined Catholic Charities, UJA-Federation of New York, and the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies to unload food donated by Goya Foods onto Catholic Charities’ Mobile Food Pantry for delivery to food pantries, soup kitchens, and meal programs that serve New Yorkers in need, reports MYFOXNY.

Feeding Our Neighbors: An Interfaith Response began in 2012 and is a joint effort to raise food and funds to replenish food pantries and soup kitchens that feed hungry neighbors.

This year’s effort has been significantly enhanced by the generous donation of 300,000 pounds of food by Goya Foods and by the participation of 26 ShopRite stores in the Hudson Valley region.

Together, Catholic Charities, UJA-Federation, and the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies maximized their impact to realize a goal of collecting and distributing 1 million meals to feed the hungry across New York.

College Student Takes Time Off to Feed the Hungry

Monday, September 8th, 2014

DSC_7288By Alice Kenny

Danica Brown, a recent graduate of George Washington University and current student at Howard University Law School, shares her life-changing experiences from working this past summer at the Catholic Charities Feeding Our Neighbors emergency food program.

Check out excerpts from her first-person account:

Supervising teenagers this summer gave me a reality check on the real issues my peers face every day. It taught me responsibility: I realized that, within the connection we formed, they are looking to me for guidance and what I say could possibly impact their decision making so I need to heed my responsibilities and lead by example.

I cannot reiterate how thankful I am for this summer opportunity. The importance of food pantries in the fabric of middle class America is not the typical image that comes to mind when we think about food assistance programs, but this summer it was a reality. Yes we served a great amount of low-income families but also working moms and dads, who although are putting out their greatest efforts, do not make enough to place a balanced meal on the table.

With Danica’s eyes now opened to the very real need around us, she has become determined, she says, to extend what she learned beyond this summer and beyond New York.

The lessons I learned this summer didn’t stop with me returning back to college. This semester I am taking a Special Topics class: Sociology of Food: School Lunch Policy. Now that I am President of the Black Student Union at George Washington University we are doing several community service projects at local soup kitchens and food banks around DC.

Read her full article and more in the PTS Newsletter.

Celebrating Health Ambassadors and Queens and Kings for a Day

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

kennedy_centerBy Alice Kenny

On June 6, one hundred and sixty volunteers from the national consulting firm Deloitte fanned out to more than a dozen separate site locations affiliated with Catholic Charities. Below is the fourth installment in a series about their adventures and a glimpse at the large amount that together we can accomplish.

Hobbling on walkers with shopping carts dragged behind, 60 low-income elderly men and women served by the food bank and senior center at Catholic Charities Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Center in Harlem were turned into health ambassadors and Queens and Kings for a Day.

At this Healthy Food and Fun event, 15 Deloitte volunteers pitched in with Catholic Charities staff to convert the Kennedy Center auditorium into a health fair and fitness center.  There were exercise stations, hands on cooking presentations in Spanish and English and, best of all, a luncheon feast.

“This is outside the box,” said Catholic Charities Division Director Dianne Johnson as she helped stuff participants’ goodie bags with colanders, cutting boards, vegetables and more.

“Today was not just talking about nutrition but experiencing it.  It ties together everything we do.”

Join us in Feeding Our Neighbors.

Catholic Charities Marches with Puerto Rican Day Parade

Monday, June 9th, 2014

By Alice Kenny

Cheered by NYC Hispanic Society Sanitation Department members seated atop a sanitation truck, serenaded by DJs blasting salsa music and wedged between Goya and Coca-Cola floats, Catholic Charities joined the National Puerto Rican Day Parade on June 8, 2014 to celebrate Puerto Rican pride, drum up support to feed our hungry neighbors and promote the vast array of services we provide those in need.

As hundreds of thousands of marchers and onlookers packed Manhattan’s 5th Avenue, Catholic Charities staff distributed prayer cards, fans and memorabilia complete with Catholic Charities phone numbers to draw attention to the growing hunger crisis and let New Yorkers know how to contact us for help.

Like the Puerto Rican community, Catholic Charities is part of the fabric of New York City.  For more than 100 years, Catholic Charities has helped solve the problems of New Yorkers in need, non-Catholics and Catholics alike.  The neglected child, the homeless family and the hungry senior among those who rely on us for help.

But with poverty up and food stamps (now called S.N.A.P.) down due to recent federal cuts, lines are growing at Catholic Charities food pantries across the archdiocese.   Hunger has exploded throughout New York; one out of nearly every two children in the largely Hispanic community of East Harlem lives in poverty.

Our Feeding Our Neighbors Campaign is fighting back with a goal of raising enough funds to provide one million meals for the hungry.  The Goya Corporation made a significant dent in this goal, splitting a donation of 5,000 pounds of rice, beans and specialty foods between Catholic Charities St. Cecilia’s food pantry in East Harlem and a food pantry run by Little Sisters of the Assumption Family Health Service, an affiliate of Catholic Charities.

Find your friends in our Puerto Rican Day Parade slide show.

Join us in feeding our neighbors.

Do you need help?

Call

  • Our Catholic Charities Help Line at 888-744-7900
  • Our New York State (NYS) New Americans Hotline: 212-419-3737 or 1-800-566-7636 (Toll-free in NYS)

Find out more here.

Theology on Tap Goes Latin

Tuesday, April 29th, 2014

TOT LogoBy Alice Kenny

Join fellow young adults for fun, camaraderie and a rousing discussion with a Latin flavor when we team up today, Tuesday, April 29, 2014, with Centro Altagracia de Fe y Justicia at Heights Tavern in happening Washington Heights.

Theology-on-Tap NYC is an opportunity for young adults to explore issues and topics that relate to the Catholic faith in a fun and casual environment.

Tonight we’re teaming with Centro Altagracia and Catholic Charities’ “Feeding our Neighbors” campaign.

  • Feed your social life by joining us.
  • Feed your thirst with…well, you know…
  • And feed our neighbors by bringing canned goods to donate.

Get a 5% discount on your bar check by donating 10 lbs. of food or more!

Wonder what to bring?

Check out our list here and learn more.

That’s tonight, April 29, 2014, from 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. at Heights Tavern, 3910 Broadway, NYC.

RSVP at Centro Altagracia de Fe y Justicia

The Centro Altagracia de Fe y Justicia is dedicated to putting faith into action, promoting social justice, through dynamic collaborations and needs-based initiatives, in service to the communities of Washington Heights and Inwood.

 

Disabled Teens Take Their Turn Changing Lives

Friday, March 14th, 2014

By Alice Kenny

In a classroom decorated with primary-colored posters detailing how to tell time, multiply and “Follow Your Conscience,” teens with various disabilities from St. Dominic’s School packed boxes with donated food to support Catholic Charities “Feeding Our Neighbors” campaign.

“A lot of these children feel disconnected,” said St. Dominic’s Principal Paul Siragusa. “Helping feed the hungry makes them feel they have an impact on society that they never before could have dreamed of.”

And the 80 students, ages 5- 21, had a major impact. Together they took on the entire food drive, from making posters to studying foods’ nutritional values to soliciting donations to preparing food for distribution. All told, the students collected 500 pounds of food, enough to provide the hungry with 625 meals.

Some of the financially less fortunate children contributed as well, which, Mr. Siragusa said, “was worth more than an adults bringing in an entire bag.”

Located in Rockland County’s rolling hills, St. Dominic’s School provides targeted learning for children with special needs. Its intimate size, including two instructors for every eight students, is balanced by its large reputation. St. Dominic’s draws children from New York City, Westchester, Rockland and Orange counties whose needs are too great to be met by their local schools.

The school is part of Saint Dominic’s Home. This nonprofit Catholic social welfare agency affiliated with Catholic Charities is dedicated to meeting the educational, physical, social, emotional, medical, vocational and spiritual needs of 2,300 individuals who are developmentally disabled, socially disadvantaged and/or vocationally challenged.

Founded in 1878, Saint Dominic’s Home began as a safe haven for immigrant children who had been abandoned on the streets of New York City. Today, St. Dominc’s Home provides person-centered care for individuals with developmental disabilities in the Bronx, Orange and Rockland counties so they can live their lives with hope and dignity in a family-like setting. It prepares and supports foster parents so they can give children, who often have been neglected, abused, or abandoned, a brighter future and a loving home and family. It delivers a continuum of care to adults with mental illness and provides them the greatest level of independence. It grows the minds of disadvantaged preschoolers so they are motivated to excel. It gives children and youth with developmental disabilities and serious emotional disturbance living at home the opportunity to live in a more stable family environment.

And, through St. Dominic’s School, it enables children facing emotional and educational challenges to reach their potential.

The food drive, Mr. Siragusa said, has served as a springboard for a variety of activities. Students now participate in “Letters to the Heroes” where they write letters to soldiers thanking them for their service. They also take part in “Operation Goody Bag,” sending candy and homemade Valentine’s Day cards to first responders.

Despite their personal challenges, the students have learned, Mr. Siragusa said, that “there is always something they can do to help someone else.”

Learn more about St. Dominic’s School and Home.

Teens Team Up to Fight Hunger

Monday, February 10th, 2014

WHITE PLAINS — Christopher Martinez hefted a cardboard box containing non-perishables like Cheerios and Wacky Mac macaroni headed for the hungry, reports Alex Taylor in The Journal News.

“I wanted to come here because I wanted to help people,” said Martinez, 15, a sophomore at Lincoln High School in Yonkers and member of the St. Peter’s Parish. “Just seeing people in the street when I have so much at my house.”

About 50 Catholic and Jewish teens gathered at UJA’s Westchester offices in White Plains on Sunday afternoon to sort and pack a room piled high with hundreds of bottles, cans and cartons of nonperishable food as part of an interfaith food drive. The outpouring of donations were later delivered to local food pantries.

The event held capped off ‘Feeding Our Neighbors: An Interfaith Response, ‘ organized by Catholic Charities and the United Jewish Appeal. This Archdiocesan-Wide Drive to Replenish Food Pantries ran from Sunday, January 26th – Sunday, February 2nd 2014. Its goal was to provide 1,000,000 additional meals for hungry New Yorkers, non-Catholics and Catholics alike.
The documented increase in hunger among New York children and families combined with the Senate’s recent vote for yet deeper cuts in the SNAP food stamp program makes the impact of this campaign, now in its third year, even more profound.

One out of five New York families now struggles to feed their children. As a result, hungry families, children and the elderly are braving snow, ice and freezing temperatures to reach local food banks. Catholic Charities food banks served 48% more meals in December 2013 compared with one year earlier.

At Sunday’s event, William Gregson expressed concern about the number of New Yorkers who go hungry on a regular basis.

“I just want to make sure everybody who is in need can get food,” said Gregson, 15, a student at Horace Greeley High School in Chappaqua.

Check out this Journal News video interview with Catholic Charities Catholic Charities Special Assistant to the Director Luz Tavarez-Salazar who is coordinating the Feeding Our Neighbors campaign .

Just 3 Days Left for Feeding Our Neighbors Campaign

Friday, January 31st, 2014

By Alice Kenny

Only three days left for you to pitch in with Feeding Our Neighbors, our Archdiocesan-wide weeklong drive to replenish food pantries supporting non-Catholics and Catholics alike.

“Pope Francis recently wrote ‘if we don’t share our life is a slow suicide,’” Timothy Cardinal Dolan told a crowd at St. Patrick’s Cathedral at the kickoff to this year’s campaign.  “And this is a very simple from-the-heart appeal to share food and it works at this cold time of the year when Christmas charity is almost exhausted and when people are looking for food.”

There is just one goal for Feeding Our Neighbors: that New Yorkers answer the call to feed those who are suffering in our community.

Click here and join us in Feeding our Neighbors and  specify “Feeding Our Neighbors” in the comments field on our Online Gift page.

Or text “CCHOPE” to 85944 to make a quick, easy $10 donation. 

Watch and listen as Cardinal Dolan speaks about Feeding Our Neighbors at St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

“The Feeding Our Neighbors campaign works,” Cardinal Dolan said.