Posts Tagged ‘Gov. Andrew Cuomo’

Learn English on Your Cell Phone

Friday, May 1st, 2015

All immigrants in New York State will have access to a free English program pending the results of a pilot with Spanish-speaking residents. Shutterstock/Rob Marmion

Plenty of politicians think that immigrants should learn English, but now one of them is doing something about it, reports Latin Times.

Catholic Charities is partnering with the New York State Office for New Americans to enroll immigrants in the program.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D-New York) made his state the first to offer English lessons via cellphone as a part of a pilot program run by the social venture Cell-ED. The first phase of the program, directed at Spanish speakers in selected New York counties, reportedly costs the state a mere$14,000. The program will be free for participants, aside from the cost of minutes and text messages on their phones. Cuomo’s administration hope that the English lessons will help struggling immigrant who hope to improve their English but don’t have time to attend classes in person.

The program, overseen by the The New York State Office for New Americans (ONA) and contracted to Cell-ED combines text messages, voice tutorials, and two-way communication with tutors. Pending a successful pilot, all New York state residents will be able to call a Cell-ED number to begin receiving tutorials as well as the ability to send back answers to be automatically reviewed and corrected. While the pilot program is offered in Spanish, the ONA says that other languages such as Mandarin, French and others could be added in the future.

Read the full story in Latin Times.

Funding Government Programs Could Reduce Poverty by 70%!

Monday, March 9th, 2015

Three of New York City’s largest religious organizations say local poverty could be reduced by nearly 70% by adding billions of dollars in funding to several government programs, reports a just-released article in the Wall Street Journal.

The study, released today by Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York, the Federation of Protestant Welfare Agencies and the UJA-Federation of New York, reports this Wall Street Journal excerpt:

…found that targeted spending on government programs like transitional jobs, tax credits for seniors and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance program, known as SNAP, could lower the rate of poverty in the city by 44% to 69%.

Roughly 20% of New York City residents live below the poverty level, according to data from 2009 to 2013 released by the U.S. Census Bureau.

The study, conducted by the Urban Institute, found that a $6.4 billion to $9 billion investment in seven government programs— transitional jobs, minimum wage, earnings supplements, tax credits for seniors and those with disabilities, SNAP benefits, child care subsidies and housing vouchers—would have a dramatic effect on poverty across the five boroughs. The study was based on 2012 data.

“This is about the basics of human dignity,” said Monsignor Kevin Sullivan, executive director of the Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York. “They have a right to adequate housing. They have a right to decent meals.”

Officials with the religious groups said they had reached out to both Mayor Bill de Blasio and New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to discuss the report’s findings.

Read more in the Wall Street Journal.

Also, find out more in Crains New York.

Scam Artists Are Target of Immigration Initiative

Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

(L-R) State Secretary of State Cesar Perales, Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, Assemblyman Marcos A. Crespo, NY Immigration Coation Executive Director Steven Choi and Catholic Charities Community Services Director Beatriz Diaz Taveras

“Unethical lawyers and other scam artists that prey on New York’s immigrant community have been put on notice. The state has the means to keep tabs on them and will come down hard on anyone attempting to defraud or exploit this particularly vulnerable population,” writes Ron Lajoie in a recent Catholic New York article.

New York State’s Office for New Americans, in cooperation with a coalition of partners, including Catholic Charities, rolled out a new comprehensive initiative at a press conference at the new headquarters of Catholic Charities’ Division of Immigration and Refugee Services in Lower Manhattan Sept. 18 to combat fraud against immigrants across New York State. The initiative follows legislation recently signed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo mandating stricter requirements for immigration assistance providers and tougher penalties for those who scam the system.

‘We’ve got to deliver the message that if you take advantage of immigrants it’s a crime. It’s a serious crime and we are going to prosecute you,’said New York Secretary of State Cesar Perales. ‘We’re taking proactive steps and empowering our immigrant communities through legitimate services to create a safe and fair economic landscape that will benefit every New Yorker.’

A main component of the new initiative will be the expansion of the New York State New Americans Hotline—800-566-7636—operated by Catholic Charities to serve as a resource to coordinate immigration fraud complaints as well as to offer service referrals…

Beatriz Diaz Taveras, executive director of Catholic Charities Community Services, told CNY as many as 10 percent of the calls coming into the hotline deal with fraud issues…

‘Now that we have this campaign and people are seeing it on the subways and in newspapers, we have over 200 calls a month,’ Ms. Diaz Taveras said. ‘And folks are calling about attorneys who have taken their money, who have not provided services, notarios that they have gone to that have given incorrect information. And they are asking how can they be helped and what recourse do they have?’

Somos El Futuro – We Are the Future – Conference Rallies for Dream Act

Friday, March 28th, 2014

Mateo Tabares and two dozen other students chanted “Education not deportation” and similar slogans Saturday morning as they rallied at the Somos el Futuro conference on Saturday, March 22, 2014 at the Empire State Plaza in Albany,” reports Steve Barnes for TimesUnion.com.

They were shouting their support for the DREAM Act, a measure that would allow access to state financial aid for New York college students who are undocumented:

 

The bill likely would mean the difference between Tabares, an 18-year-old from Queens, being able to go to college full time or having to work 40 hours a week to pay tuition for only part-time classes, thus delaying his education, he said. Tabares was among a group of young people who traveled upstate to advocate for the DREAM Act during this weekend’s Somos El Futuro conference, a gathering of Latino lawmakers. The DREAM Act would benefit an estimated 8,000 students, proponents say.

Defeated in the state Senate on March 17 by a 30-29 vote — two short of the 32 needed for a majority — the bill is the subject of continuing negotiations. Supporters are pressuring Gov. Andrew Cuomo to include it in the state budget, which is due April 1.

(TimesUnion.com)

 

Msgr. Sullivan joined students, members of the state Senate and Assembly, labor leaders and others to discuss the DREAM Act and other key policy issues at the annual spring conference of Somos el Futuro, the New York State Assembly’s Puerto Rican/Hispanic Task force dedicated to creating opportunities for Hispanics through participation in public policy.

Read the full story in the Times Union.com.

Check out the New York State Catholic Conference’s New York State DREAM Act Memoradum of Support:

 

MEMORANDUM OF SUPPORT

Re: A.2597 Moya / S.2378 Peralta In Relation to New York State DREAM Act

The above-referenced legislation would create the New York DREAM Fund Commission and would provide opportunities for immigrant students who meet certain criteria to be eligible for financial aid to assist them attend institutions of higher education.

The New York State Catholic Conference supports the New York State DREAM Act, and strongly urges enactment of this legislation.

The bill is an attempt to allow young people who have demonstrated a commitment to education and who are of good moral character to access financial aid opportunities without regard to immigration status, and would create a mechanism to raise money for college scholarships for the children of immigrants. Other states have passed similar legislation and New York State, with its history of welcoming immigrants, should be at the forefront of these efforts to support immigrant populations who have contributed so much to the vitality of our state. The chance to earn a higher education degree will allow these immigrant students to realize their potential and make a greater contribution to our economy.

Currently immigrants receive elementary and secondary education without regard to their immigration status. Many of these children have lived in this country from a very early age and know no other country as home. However, once they have their high school diplomas in hand, they are often blocked from continuing their education for financial reasons. The Commission established by this bill would raise funds to provide scholarships to deserving students who would be required to have taken steps to regularize their immigration status. These students would also be eligible for other awards and scholarships that would advance their educational opportunities. Parents and family members of students would also be eligible to participate in the NYS College Savings Program with an individual taxpayer identification number (ITIN).

The Catholic Conference has long advocated for a comprehensive immigration reform package at the federal level that includes an earned legalization program, secure borders that reduce risk to individuals and change in the immigration system that promotes family unity. In the interim there are steps that can be taken at the state level to improve the current situation. This legislation is one such effort.

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and the New York State Catholic Conference have voiced support for the federal Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors (DREAM) Act. Likewise, we support this legislation that we believe will afford deserving young immigrants an opportunity to pursue post-secondary education.