Posts Tagged ‘High School for Media and Communications’

Teens to Serve on NYC Community Boards

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2015

Downtown Express photos by Dusica Sue Malesevic Teens interested in applying for community board positions debated the best way to spend $100 million of public money during an exercise in Borough President Gale Brewer’s office last Friday.

It had all the makings of a typical teen party — pizza and soda, excited chatter, and of course, young people, writes Dusica Sue Malesevic in Downtown Express. But it was no party, but rather a meeting to discuss a serious commitment that some adults would shy away from: serving on a community board.

And far from shying away, students from Catholic Charities’ Alianza Division in collaboration with the High School for Media and Communications, were active participants.

Each potential applicant took turns introducing him or herself, stating their age and their school or university…The meeting gave the teens the opportunity to learn community board basics and ask questions that are specific to their age and circumstances: homework, going off to college and working with mostly adults.

For 17-year-old Shirlyn Perez, a junior at High School for Media and Communications, to serve on a board is an opportunity that is “very appealing — not only because I get to contribute to my community but also learn a lot from it.”

Perez, who lives in Washington Heights, said she will definitely be applying to her neighborhood’s board, C.B. 12.

“It’s an exposure to many other things that we don’t get to experience at school,” she said.

Perez said she would focus on the issues of low undergraduate rates and drug use in her neighborhood.

Her classmate, Marleny Delarosa, 16 and from the Bronx, said she would also apply for C.B. 12.

“I care for my community so I’m interested in knowing what’s going on and what I can do to help improve it,” she said.

Read the full coverage in Downtown Express

Teens Solve Murder Mystery

Thursday, May 15th, 2014

By Alice Kennystudents-science

The Washington Heights teens had a murder to solve.

  •      The Victim: a female college student.
  •      The Suspects:  a classmate, a tutor and a boyfriend.
  •      The Clues:
    •      skin fragments, perhaps the murderers, beneath the victims fingernails
    •      blood on the furniture
    •      foot prints on the carpet.

The investigators, nearly two dozen high school students in all, piled into a bus that brought them from Washington Heights where per-capita income is half the New York average to the forensic lab at Stony Brook, one of the top state universities in New York.

The students participate in the Catholic Charities Alianza Division GPS-GW program at the High School for Media and Communications.  The program provides key support to promote higher education for low-income teens.  The event, hosted by Catholic Charities Alianza Division and sponsored by Stony Brook Center for Science and Math Education and the United Way, was designed to encourage these teens to consider as a career the up-and-coming field of biotechnology.

To solve the murder mystery, students applied the scientific method.  They evaluated evidence, formed a hypothesis, planned and performed experiments and analyzed results.

So who was the murderer?  Not again!

You guessed it… the boyfriend.

College Fair Opens Teens’ Minds to New Dreams

Friday, February 15th, 2013

 By Alice Kenny

Hundreds of students and nearly 30 colleges and universities participated last week in the second-annual college fair hosted by Catholic Charities’ Alianza Division in collaboration with the High School for Media and Communications.

The event, held on the School for Media and Communications’ campus in Washington Heights, promoted Catholic Charities’ Alianza Division’s mission to help children, youth and families break the cycle of poverty and fulfill their potential as members of the global community.

The college fair was important, said Elizabeth Payero, Program Coordinator for the Division’s High School for Media and Communications, because it gave students throughout the campus the opportunity to gather information needed to make informed decisions about which schools they should focus on and where they should apply.

Representatives from numerous colleges – including Ivy League schools such as Harvard – along with CUNY’s, SUNY’s, UConn, the University of Bridgeport and private universities attended the fair.

Many students applied at the fair for coveted college positions.  The College of St. Rose accepted seven students on the spot.

“Participating in the college fair allowed me to open my mind to new dreams,” said high school junior Lisandy Rodriguez.