Posts Tagged ‘Msgr. Kevin Sullivan’

Catholic Church Aids Mayor’s Plan to Build Affordable Housing

Wednesday, May 7th, 2014

“Catholic Church will aid Mayor de Blasio’s plan to add affordable housing,” reports New York Daily News Bureau chief Jennifer Fermino today, May 7, 2014, in the Daily News.

“De Blasio has turned to the Catholic Church for help with his plan to build 200,000 affordable housing units over the next 10 years. The church will work with the city to create new affordable housing units and to preserve cheap apartments that are in use.”

Check out her full Daily News report below:

BY JENNIFER FERMINO

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS CITY HALL BUREAU CHIEF

Tuesday, May 6, 2014, 11:34 PM

Mayor de Blasio is turning to a higher power for help with his ambitious affordable housing plan.

De Blasio is banking on the Catholic Church to help him reach his lofty target of 200,000 affordable housing units over the next 10 years.

The church, mainly through its wing Catholic Charities, will work with the city to create new affordable housing units and to preserve cheap apartments that are already in use.
.
Catholic leaders have already offered up the former site of St. Augustine in the Bronx — a 162-year-old church that closed in 2012 and was demolished in December — and have meetings planned to redevelop as many as 10 other sites, said Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, the executive director of Catholic Charities.

The site of St. Augustine’s alone could hold “somewhere” around 100 units of low-cost housing, he said.

Sullivan said housing is a basic human right, and helping people of all faiths find it is part of the church’s mission.

“Every person made in the image and likeness of God deserves a decent place to live,” he said.
In the past 40 years, the church has developed about 10,000 units of affordable housing in all five boroughs, he said.

It scouts suitable locations and then sets up non-profits to manage housing on the sites. Catholic Charities also repairs affordable housing units that have fallen into disrepair.

Read more online in the Daily News.

More than 6,000 units of affordable housing for financially strapped families, elderly persons and formerly homeless individuals have been developed in every borough of New York City thanks to the dedicated long-term commitment of parishes, clergy, religious communities, Catholic Charities Archdiocese of New York, Catholic Charities Archdiocese of Brooklyn and Queens and affiliated community-based organizations

Catholic Charities Supports Bill to Provide Identity Cards for all New Yorkers

Friday, May 2nd, 2014

By Alice Kenny

 

Catholic Charities Executive Director Msgr. Kevin Sullivan submitted testimony yesterday, April 30, 2014, in support of proposed legislation called Intro 253 of 2014 that would provide New Yorkers who lack documentation, including undocumented immigrants, city-issued identification cards.

This ID card would help those who live and work in New York City but are shut out from key City services where ID is required.

Below is Msgr. Sullivan’s testimony:

The Catholic Church has long been in the forefront of immigration reform and services to immigrant communities regardless of one’s place of origin or religious beliefs. This legislation provides a mechanism for inclusion and identity into city life for immigrants as well as other isolated groups.
Catholic Charities is a federation of 90 agencies that:

• Protect and Nurture Children & Youth
• Feed the Hungry and Shelter the Homeless
• Strengthen Families and resolve Crisis
• Support the Physically and Emotionally Challenged, and
• Welcome and Integrate Immigrants and Refugees.

The Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York, through its many agencies and programs, has worked tirelessly to help refugees fleeing persecution to get protection in the United States and immigrants to reunite with their families legally, obtain proper work authorization, apply for naturalization, learn English and civics, and prepare to pass their citizenship exams. We assist more than 100,000 individuals annually. We are privileged to operate the New York State New Americans Hotline which, this year alone, has received close to 25,000 calls in 17 different languages. We recently relocated our major center to downtown New York to provide better access for those from all boroughs.

New York City has a long tradition, like Catholic Charities, of welcoming immigrants and providing access to ensure dignity and justice for the human person. This bill will provide the ability for immigrants, seniors, homeless persons and other marginalized groups to obtain identification cards to access government services and structures. The lives of many will be vastly improved by the acceptance of various and broad forms of proof to establish residency and identity and thereby allow people to obtain identity cards.

We can’t deny the contribution and influence of immigrants to the culture and economy of the City of New York. Establishing a way to access public schools to pick up their children, open bank accounts, get library cards, cash checks and even enter a public building are just some of the ways that this municipal identification card can ensure that we continue on the path toward full civic participation for all New Yorkers, regardless of status.

We urge the speedy passage of this legislation and, again, congratulate the bill’s sponsor, the Chair of the Immigration Committee, the Speaker and the other members of the City council for the introduction and support of this crucial measure. Thank you for the opportunity to testify on this bill.

For the inside scoop on the potential backlash or embrace of municipal ID cards Msgr. Sullivan interviewed John DeStefano the former Mayor of New Haven, CT in this recent episode of JustLove radio. New Haven, a city of about 130,000, pioneered municipal ID cards without regard to legal status in 2007.

JustLove airs weekly on Saturday at 10am EST on SIRIUS XM Satellite Radio on The Catholic Channel 129.

As Sandy Recovery Stalls, Wall Street Journal Interviews Msgr. Sullivan for Solutions

Monday, April 21st, 2014

By Alice Kenny

_DSC1063In the Wall Street Journal’s recent series uncovering shortcomings in New York City’s Sandy recovery programs, Reporter Michael Howard Saul turned to Msgr. Kevin Sullivan for insight. Frustrated Hurricane Sandy storm victims and elected officials, Mr. Saul reports, say City Hall has been heavy on promises and short on results.

“Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, executive director of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York, which is helping storm victims, said homeowners’ recovery efforts ‘have been made even more challenging by layers of red tape brought on by the multiple layers of government agencies involved in the process.’”

To counter this morass, Mayor Bill de Blasio told the Wall Street Journal that his recently appointed administration has been working “day and night to hack through the red tape.”

Meanwhile, Catholic Charities continues to help Sandy victims recover.  From the time Hurricane Sandy pounded New York, Catholic Charities has been providing disaster relief to those who need it. From disaster response professionals visiting parishes to deliver information and resources, to volunteers collecting and distributing food and supplies, to neighbors checking in on neighbors, the entire Catholic Charities community has responded to meet the human needs of the victims, providing help and creating hope for rebuilding lives.

The New York State Disaster Case Management Program run by Catholic Charities has provided information, referral and disaster case management to nearly 22,000 households.

“Families and homeowners who are rebuilding from the devastating effects of Hurricane Sandy are still facing a complex and long-term recovery,” Msgr. Sullivan said.  “Our long-term case management for these families is critical to navigating some of the unintended consequences that arise such as potentially higher tax bills on their property that they did not anticipate.”

Are you struggling to recover from Superstorm Sandy?

An Inside Peek into a Volunteer’s Mantra and Motivation

Friday, April 11th, 2014

By Alice Kenny

Catholic Charities is rounding out National Volunteer Week, April 6-12, 2014, with a special interview on our Catholic Charities JustLove radio program with Takouhi Mosoian.

“At Catholic Charities, you can see the older volunteers foreshadow what the younger volunteers will be doing later,” says Ms. Mosoian who volunteered for Catholic Charities and now works in our Community & Social Development Department.

“It’s a dedicated group of people and they love what they do.”

Listen to this recent episode as the show’s host, Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, interviews Ms. Mosoian about what motivated her to volunteer for Catholic Charities.

“When I graduated high school, we had a motto that went ‘leave your community better than you found it.’ That’s something that has always stuck with me.”

Please join us during National Volunteer Week and every week to help leave our community better than we found it.

Looking for a volunteer opportunity tailored just for you?

Tune in to JustLove on The Catholic Channel 129, SIRIUS XM Satellite Radio.

Family Man Angel Rojas Gunned Down on Bus Ride Home from Work

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

DEBBIE EGAN-CHIN/NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

The last thing Angel Rojas said to his mother was “hello,” reports the New York Daily News today, March 24, 2014.

Angel Rojas, the 39-year-old father who was shot dead by a gangbanger on the B15 bus in Brooklyn Thursday, was calling his mom on his way home from work that night as he always did.

… Then the phone went dead.

Kahton Anderson, 14, who aimed his .357-Magnum pistol at a rival gang member but missed, instead accidentally shooting Rojas, was charged with second-degree murder.

Left behind are Mr. Rojas’ widow, Maria Lopez, and their children, April, 8, and Saury, 12.

An immigrant from the Dominican Republic, Mr. Rojas was working two jobs to support his family.

With Mr. Rojas gone, his widow said she can no longer afford their modest, second-floor Brownsville apartment on the meager pay she earns as a part-time home attendant.

Catholic Charities Executive Director Msgr. Kevin Sullivan attended Mr. Rojas’ wake at Ponce Funeral Home in Brooklyn yesterday.

As the Daily News reports, you can help the family by sending a check to Catholic Charities, 1011 First Ave., New York, NY 10022.

Online donations can be made at CatholicCharitiesny.org.

So far, the fund has raised more than $6,600, including two donations by phone for $1,000 each. A total of 52 people have donated so far.

Learn more about the Rojas family in this Daily News video.

Catholic New York Editorial: More Feeling Hunger’s Effects

Monday, March 24th, 2014

Msgr. Sullivan at St. Jerome’s food pantry

The numbers are shocking, writes Catholic New York in this recent editorial:

 In just five years, the number of New York City residents who depend on food pantries and soup kitchens has shot up to 1.4 million. That’s 200,000 more than in 2008      and it accounts for one-fifth of the city’s residents

And contrary to popular perception, the vast majority of those battling hunger are not the homeless.

They’re older women, they’re working families, they’re children and they’re veterans.

The appalling statistics: 1 in 5 city children live in food scarce homes; 1 in 6 city adults live in food scarce homes; 11.5 percent of people over 60 don’t have   enough food, an increase of 33 percent since 2008; 64 percent of people relying on the city’s food pantries and soup kitchens are women; 95,000 food recipients are     veterans.

The hunger crisis, and it is indeed a crisis, was spotlighted in lengthy and detailed coverage this week in the New York Daily News, which also pointed out the strains   placed on the charitable agencies, many of them Catholic groups, who run the city’s network of some 1,000 food pantries and soup kitchens.

   Catholic New York

 

Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, executive director of the Archdiocesan Catholic Charities, told the paper that people are turning to us for emergency help because it’s so hard for them to find jobs, or decent-paying jobs. Many, he added, don’t have enough to pay rent and to eat.

To lend an immediate hand and get personal insight he can share with legislators, Msgr. Sullivan is making the rounds, rolling up his sleeves and helping out at local food pantries affiliated with Catholic Charities.  Last week he volunteered at St. Jerome’s pantry in the Bronx.

“It’s an astounding surge in need,” he said.

Read the full editorial in Catholic New York.

 

Msgr. Sullivan Joins Gov. Cuomo to Celebrate Office of New Americans

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

By Alice Kenny

Msgr. Kevin Sullivan joined Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, members of the New York State legislature and fellow members of the New York Immigration Coalition in Albany yesterday, March 18, to commemorate the one-year anniversary of the Office for New Americans.  A groundbreaking event, the anniversary marks the first time a statewide office has focused solely on assisting our state’s immigrants in their efforts to contribute to the economy and become a part of the family of New York.

The Office’s cornerstone includes a network of 27 neighborhood-based Opportunity Centers hosted within existing community-based organizations throughout the State. The Centers help New Americans learn English, prepare them for the U.S. citizenship exam and help them start and grow businesses so they can fully participate in New York State’s civic and economic life.

Nearly a quarter of these centers are affiliated with Catholic Charities, demonstrating the emphasis and value we place on assisting new New Yorkers to integrate and participate in our state’s civic and economic life.

Msgr. Sullivan joined with fellow community leaders and elected officials to outline the Opportunity Centers’ major accomplishments as well as possibilities for expansion to support economic growth.

“Fostering economic development and allowing immigrants to become fully integrated are important outcomes that the New American Centers allow our new neighbors to achieve,” he said.

Statistics demonstrate their success.  New York’s 4.3 million immigrants make up more than a quarter of New York’s total work force, reported  Steven Choi, executive director of the New York Immigration Coalition, and account for $229 billion in economic output.  It is estimated that each eligible foreign-born New Yorker increases their individual income by up to $3,800 when they naturalize.  Furthermore, if all eligible foreign-born New Yorkers naturalized, their collective earnings in New York would increase by $1.5 to $2.2 billion.

“Immigrants are an incredible gift to any country and their industriousness teaches the rest of us that even we can strive for greater heights,” Msgr. Sullivan added.  “New York is so blessed to be the home and the gateway for those who have made our state a much richer place.”

The Office for New Americans also supports the New York State New Americans Hotline, the toll-free, multi-lingual information center run by Catholic Charities.

Are you a New American looking for help…

  • Finding English-for-Speakers-of-other-Languages (ESOL) training?
  • Preparing for the naturalization process?
  • Connecting to business resources to harness your entrepreneurial spirit?
  • Developing and leveraging your professional skills?
  • Receiving Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals?
  • Strengthening the connections with your community?
  • Avoiding exploitation?

Call our New Americans Hotline at 800-566-7636

Daily News Exposes Hunger Crisis in New York

Monday, March 17th, 2014


“It’s a quiet crisis,” New York Daily News reporters Ginger Otis and Barry Paddock write in this in-depth exploration of hunger in New York. “In a city of plenty,” they continue in this front page story posted Sunday in the New York Daily News, “a staggering number of people are struggling to feed themselves and their families.”

Learn what they find out when they interview experts including Catholic Charities Executive Director Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, visit Catholic Charities food pantries and meet those we serve:

“Nearly one in five New Yorkers, 1.4 million people, now rely on a patchwork network of 1,000 food pantries and soup kitchens across the city to eat.

That represents an increase of 200,000 people in five years — straining the charities that are trying to help…
Yet those working on the front lines of the hunger crisis say it’s still not enough.

‘It’s an astounding surge in need, and it’s because it is so hard for people to find jobs, or find a decent-paying job. They are turning to us for emergency help,’ said Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, 63, executive director of 90 free food outlets run by Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York.

‘So many people, too many people, don’t have enough money to pay for rent and also eat.’

At (Catholic Charities’) Washington Heights Ecumenical Food Pantry, bags packed with milk, juice, rice, pasta, tomato sauce, dry beans and other staples fly off the shelves.

Located in a small church vestry, the pantry is open one day a week, serving a steady clientele of 275 people. It could easily help three times as many, if only it had the food, volunteers said.

From soup kitchens in the Bronx, to mobile food markets on Staten Island and in Brooklyn, to pantries in Queens, the story is the same: lines stretching longer and longer, people arriving earlier and earlier, even in the depths of winter.

‘Our Lady of Grace, in the northeast Bronx, saw the number of new households double in November — a 100% increase,’ said Paul Costiglio, spokesman for Catholic Charities. “Across the board, our programs are reporting a continued increase in the number of working people, unemployed and families.”

Read more in the Daily News.

Check out this accompanying Daily News editorial:

Too many New Yorkers, too many good hard-working people, too many children, too many elderly parents, lack the resources to put food on the table.

Too many cannot afford basic nutrition — bread, milk, a piece of fruit, a portion of vegetables, a slice of meat. The stuff of survival, not the stuff of fun or frivolity…

These are our neighbors, family members and friends.

This is not New York, city of limitless opportunity. This is a New York that must do better.

A Call to Do Better as a City

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

Left to Right: Central Park South Skyline and The Auburn Family Residence Ruth Fremson/The New York Times

 

THE NEW YORK TIMES – THE OPINION PAGES | LETTER

MARCH 3, 2014

To the Editor:

Re “A Packed Forum for a Rising Concern: New Skyscrapers Near Central Park” (news article, Feb. 21) and “400 Children to Be Removed from 2 Shelters” (front page, Feb. 21):

In the eclectic way I look at the morning news, I read these two articles back to back. Two numbers caught my attention: From the first article, apartments selling for as much as $95 million; and from the second article, the cost of two homeless shelter upgrades, $13 million.

Something is seriously wrong with this picture. We cannot refrain from demanding that we do better as a city, as a country and as a world. I am not looking to assign blame, but the end result is just plain wrong. I am more interested in identifying those who are willing to be responsible to help right the situation.

We don’t and we won’t live in a perfect world, but we have to do better. As a first step, let’s just reverse the numbers: Cap the apartment at $13 million, and provide $95 million for shelter upgrades. At least then we’d be moving in the right direction.

 

Msgr. KEVIN SULLIVAN
Executive Director, Catholic Charities
Archdiocese of New York

 

Where None Are So Poor They Have Nothing to Give; None So Rich They Have Nothing to Receive

Friday, February 28th, 2014

L-R: Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, Peter C. Georgiopoulos, Cardinal Timothy Michael Dolan, John A. Thain, Pat Battle and Catherine Kinney


Check out the inspiring vision Msgr. Kevin Sullivan shared with a packed crowd on Wednesday, February 26, at Catholic Charities annual gala at The Waldorf-Astoria on Wednesday.

During the past year, stock markets have hit a new high.  New York City has a new Mayor. Tragically, new violence and ongoing civil unrest afflict countries with familiar and unfamiliar names, Pope Francis, whom everybody is quoting, has been named Time’s Person of the Year, and in case you hadn’t noticed it’s snowed a bit.    

And through all of this – daily Catholic Charities compassionately and effectively provided emergency meals, prevented evictions, counseled families recovering from Super-Storm Sandy, provided day care for working moms, welcomed immigrants by teaching  English and finding jobs and established a new youth wellness program – and much more. 

Your critical support for Catholic Charities helps to deepen and expand these services, meet unmet and new needs and strengthen a network of some 90 agencies that carries out this vital work in the communities and neighborhoods of greater New York.

Also we have a new buzz word: “inequality.”  For Catholic Charities inequality is not a spiritual catchphrase, nor a political slogan and certainly not a mantra-like wedge to be used to divide us from each other.  For Catholic Charities, inequality is the sad reality that our staff and volunteers encounter every day in our neighbors – a reality that urgently challenges us to come together to build a common good in which the basics – decent housing, nutritious meals, a good job and a supportive and loving family – are had by all. 

Our core belief that every person is made in the image of God demands no less from us.  

Catholic Charities works with individuals who, along with being poor and struggling, have remarkable strengths.  We envision a world of greater solidarity which builds on, and draws from, the strengths and resources of us all -  a world in which none are so poor that they have nothing to give and none too rich that they have nothing to receive.

Find out more about the event and its honorees

Check out these just-released gala photos.

Looking for more inspiration? Watch our just-released video, “Stories of Help & Hope” now.