Posts Tagged ‘Pope John Paul II’

Catholic Charities Celebrates as Canonized Popes Spread Peace

Monday, April 28th, 2014

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By Alice Kenny

Catholic Charities celebrates the uniting yesterday, April 27, 2014, of three of the best-loved leaders in the history of the Roman Catholic Church when Pope Francis canonized his predecessors, Pope John XXIII and Pope John Paul II, in a special ceremony in St. Peter’s Square.

The two popes, now recognized as saints, both rose from very humble beginnings to lead the Roman Catholic Church, reports CNN.

John XXIII (1881-1963) — known as Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli before he became Pope — was one of 13 children born into a family of Italian peasants, farmers from a tiny village in the country’s north, before being sent away to study for the priesthood at the age of 11.

John Paul II (1920-2005), born Karol Jozef Wojtyla, was brought up in a grimy industrial town in Poland first controlled by Germany and later by the U.S.S.R. His soldier father raised him after his mother died when he was just eight.

Huge crowds – nearly one million people – witnessed the unprecedented ceremony at St. Peter’s Square in Vatican City. Millions more around the world watched as two former pontiffs were for the first time installed as saints in a dual canonization.

In another first on this historic day, two living popes were present for the ceremony. Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI, who resigned from the papacy a year ago citing health reasons, was not at the altar but was greeted warmly by Francis both before and after the event.

Pope John Paul II, now beatified, advised us to “not be afraid to take a chance on peace, to teach peace, to live peace.”

Just as these men showed peace to others, we invite you to join us and take a chance on peace.
Join us and learn more.

Watch the canonization on CNN.

Nelson Mandela; A Hero to the World

Friday, December 6th, 2013

 

Catholic Charities joins in celebrating the life of Nelson Mandela and in mourning his death.  First a prisoner and then a president, this conqueror of apartheid was a leader for all of us in the movement towards peace.

“Nelson Mandela was a hero to the world,” said His Eminence Timothy Michael Cardinal Dolan.

“His bravery in defending human rights against the great evil of apartheid made him a symbol of courage and dignity, as well as an inspiration to people everywhere.

“As Blessed Pope John Paul II noted during his visit to South Africa in 1995, Nelson Mandela was for many years, ‘a silent and suffering ‘witness’ of your people’s yearning for true liberation,’ who, as President of South Africa, had to then ‘shoulder the burden of inspiring and challenging everyone to succeed in the task of national reconciliation and reconstruction.’

In succeeding in these crucial and difficult tasks, Nelson Mandela truly made the world a better place.

May he rest in peace”

Scholars follow in the footsteps of their namesake, Pierre Toussaint

Thursday, July 18th, 2013

By Alice Kenny

Donning blue Catholic Charities t-shirts, 18 Pierre Toussaint scholars and three of their friends recently swept floors, painted doors, washed windows and donated their time to make the Catholic Charities Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Memorial Community Center shine.

Pierre Toussaint scholars are graduating seniors from various schools in the Archdiocese of New York who demonstrate active involvement in a church or faith community.  They also score high on academic achievement.  And they demonstrate a commitment to serving others, similar to the scholars’ namesake, the Venerable Pierre Toussaint.

Mr. Toussaint was born a slave in Haiti in 1766 and died a freeman in New York City in 1853. He touched the hearts of many by living his life, he said, ‘to be an apostle of goodness to everyone he met.’ He was instrumental in raising funds for the first Catholic orphanage, starting the city’s first school for black children, providing funds for the Oblate Sisters of Providence, (a religious community of black nuns), and raising funds to build the Old Saint Patrick’s Cathedral. With  money he earned as successful entrepreneur he purchased the freedom of others instead of his own.

He was declared a “Venerable” on Dec. 17, 1997 by Pope John Paul II, for the virtuous life that he led, placing him on the path to becoming North America’s first black saint.

The students apparently lived up to their scholarship’s namesake.

“We adults are seeing the best youth come forward through the Pierre Toussaint Scholarship program,” said Catholic Charities Kennedy Center Assistant Director Ted Staniecki, “and I know my mind is at ease seeing the wonderful potential being developed for the future of our society.