Posts Tagged ‘soup kitchens’

Food: There’s No Greater Gift

Thursday, October 23rd, 2014

fooddayCatholic Charities supports a vast network of soup kitchens and food pantries, emergency shelters, temporary and transitional housing, and permanent affordable housing to help homeless families and individuals.

In any given year…

5.8 M nutritious meals served in parish and community food programs
6,498 families prevented from becoming homeless
1,267 individuals housed in temporary and transitional apartments
8,234 individuals provided with emergency overnight shelter
7,100 families living in affordable housing

Are you hungry and need help? Call our Helpline at: 888-744-7900

College Student Takes Time Off to Feed the Hungry

Monday, September 8th, 2014

DSC_7288By Alice Kenny

Danica Brown, a recent graduate of George Washington University and current student at Howard University Law School, shares her life-changing experiences from working this past summer at the Catholic Charities Feeding Our Neighbors emergency food program.

Check out excerpts from her first-person account:

Supervising teenagers this summer gave me a reality check on the real issues my peers face every day. It taught me responsibility: I realized that, within the connection we formed, they are looking to me for guidance and what I say could possibly impact their decision making so I need to heed my responsibilities and lead by example.

I cannot reiterate how thankful I am for this summer opportunity. The importance of food pantries in the fabric of middle class America is not the typical image that comes to mind when we think about food assistance programs, but this summer it was a reality. Yes we served a great amount of low-income families but also working moms and dads, who although are putting out their greatest efforts, do not make enough to place a balanced meal on the table.

With Danica’s eyes now opened to the very real need around us, she has become determined, she says, to extend what she learned beyond this summer and beyond New York.

The lessons I learned this summer didn’t stop with me returning back to college. This semester I am taking a Special Topics class: Sociology of Food: School Lunch Policy. Now that I am President of the Black Student Union at George Washington University we are doing several community service projects at local soup kitchens and food banks around DC.

Read her full article and more in the PTS Newsletter.

It Takes A lot to Humble Yourself

Tuesday, August 26th, 2014

Lizzie  Sister ShyneBy Alice Kenny

Moms and children hungry, struggling and embarrassed by their need: these are some of Lizaura German’s earliest memories.

Lizzie practically grew up at the Catholic Charities food pantry  in Washington Heights.   Her mother, the site’s longest volunteer – 36 years and counting – brought Lizzie along when she was just past kindergarten age to help out in their neighborhood center.

Those served felt comfortable sharing their fears and tears with the then-little girl.

“It takes a lot to humble yourself to let people what know what you’re going through,” Lizzie says, recalling what she learned from an early age.  “There is a lot of pride involved because people want to fix things themselves.  When people finally express their need you don’t want them to lose hope.

“A food pantry,” she adds,  “is not just a bag of food, it’s a doorway for helping clients.”

As program manager for Catholic Charities Feeding Our Neighbors program, Lizzie enters this doorway daily, sometimes seven days a week.  She oversees nearly half of Catholic Charities food pantries plus three soup kitchens – more than 30 all told – commuting from the Catskill mountains to Staten Island along with the Bronx, Manhattan and, of course, Washington Heights.

The job, she says, relies nearly as much on diplomacy as it does on knowledge.  Most food pantry staff are volunteers including retirees from Wall Street. So while they are committed to helping their community, these volunteers are also accustomed to taking charge.  Lizzie makes sure volunteers feel appreciated while guiding them to listen to those on food pantry lines and make sure they connect them to the breadth of services Catholic Charities offers.

“Clients come in for a bag of food,” Lizzie says as she exchanges smiles with an elderly woman entering the food pantry.  “But meanwhile, their lights are being turned off or they’re being evicted.  We need to make sure the client feels comfortable enough to express that to the volunteer.”

With a masters degree  in public administration from Baruch College, a background that includes a stint at the United Nations, and a dad who works as executive sous chef at the famed Carmine’s restaurant in Greenwich Village, Lizzie could likely land a job almost anywhere.

But her commitment, she says, is to those she serves at Catholic Charities.

“My job is to be the voice of the client,” she say, “because there is nothing worse than losing a client or knowing that a client was not fully helped.”

Catholic New York Editorial: More Feeling Hunger’s Effects

Monday, March 24th, 2014

Msgr. Sullivan at St. Jerome’s food pantry

The numbers are shocking, writes Catholic New York in this recent editorial:

 In just five years, the number of New York City residents who depend on food pantries and soup kitchens has shot up to 1.4 million. That’s 200,000 more than in 2008      and it accounts for one-fifth of the city’s residents

And contrary to popular perception, the vast majority of those battling hunger are not the homeless.

They’re older women, they’re working families, they’re children and they’re veterans.

The appalling statistics: 1 in 5 city children live in food scarce homes; 1 in 6 city adults live in food scarce homes; 11.5 percent of people over 60 don’t have   enough food, an increase of 33 percent since 2008; 64 percent of people relying on the city’s food pantries and soup kitchens are women; 95,000 food recipients are     veterans.

The hunger crisis, and it is indeed a crisis, was spotlighted in lengthy and detailed coverage this week in the New York Daily News, which also pointed out the strains   placed on the charitable agencies, many of them Catholic groups, who run the city’s network of some 1,000 food pantries and soup kitchens.

   Catholic New York

 

Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, executive director of the Archdiocesan Catholic Charities, told the paper that people are turning to us for emergency help because it’s so hard for them to find jobs, or decent-paying jobs. Many, he added, don’t have enough to pay rent and to eat.

To lend an immediate hand and get personal insight he can share with legislators, Msgr. Sullivan is making the rounds, rolling up his sleeves and helping out at local food pantries affiliated with Catholic Charities.  Last week he volunteered at St. Jerome’s pantry in the Bronx.

“It’s an astounding surge in need,” he said.

Read the full editorial in Catholic New York.

 

Daily News Exposes Hunger Crisis in New York

Monday, March 17th, 2014


“It’s a quiet crisis,” New York Daily News reporters Ginger Otis and Barry Paddock write in this in-depth exploration of hunger in New York. “In a city of plenty,” they continue in this front page story posted Sunday in the New York Daily News, “a staggering number of people are struggling to feed themselves and their families.”

Learn what they find out when they interview experts including Catholic Charities Executive Director Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, visit Catholic Charities food pantries and meet those we serve:

“Nearly one in five New Yorkers, 1.4 million people, now rely on a patchwork network of 1,000 food pantries and soup kitchens across the city to eat.

That represents an increase of 200,000 people in five years — straining the charities that are trying to help…
Yet those working on the front lines of the hunger crisis say it’s still not enough.

‘It’s an astounding surge in need, and it’s because it is so hard for people to find jobs, or find a decent-paying job. They are turning to us for emergency help,’ said Msgr. Kevin Sullivan, 63, executive director of 90 free food outlets run by Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York.

‘So many people, too many people, don’t have enough money to pay for rent and also eat.’

At (Catholic Charities’) Washington Heights Ecumenical Food Pantry, bags packed with milk, juice, rice, pasta, tomato sauce, dry beans and other staples fly off the shelves.

Located in a small church vestry, the pantry is open one day a week, serving a steady clientele of 275 people. It could easily help three times as many, if only it had the food, volunteers said.

From soup kitchens in the Bronx, to mobile food markets on Staten Island and in Brooklyn, to pantries in Queens, the story is the same: lines stretching longer and longer, people arriving earlier and earlier, even in the depths of winter.

‘Our Lady of Grace, in the northeast Bronx, saw the number of new households double in November — a 100% increase,’ said Paul Costiglio, spokesman for Catholic Charities. “Across the board, our programs are reporting a continued increase in the number of working people, unemployed and families.”

Read more in the Daily News.

Check out this accompanying Daily News editorial:

Too many New Yorkers, too many good hard-working people, too many children, too many elderly parents, lack the resources to put food on the table.

Too many cannot afford basic nutrition — bread, milk, a piece of fruit, a portion of vegetables, a slice of meat. The stuff of survival, not the stuff of fun or frivolity…

These are our neighbors, family members and friends.

This is not New York, city of limitless opportunity. This is a New York that must do better.

U.S. House Votes to Slash Food Stamps Further

Wednesday, January 29th, 2014

U.S. House of Representatives voted today to make further slashes of close to $9 billion in food stamp funding for hungry New Yorkers.

These cuts would be in addition to $5 billion in cuts that went into effect on November 1st.

This means more cuts for the 1.8 million New Yorkers who rely on the program to feed their families.

Parents and children are already hungry since the last cuts just 3 months ago of between $30 – $50 per family.

 

Join us in helping those in need.  Support our Feeding Our Neighbors campaign.

This united effort to fight hunger responds to Timothy Cardinal Dolan’s call that we all do our part to replenish the food pantries and soup kitchens that so many families in our community rely on to survive.

Feeding Our Neighbors, an archdiocesan-wide campaign to combat hunger, ends this Sunday, February 2, 2014.

Supported by parishes, schools and other organizations throughout the Archdiocese of New York and managed by Catholic Charities, Feeding Our Neighbors will use 100% of contributions to the campaign to support local food pantries that serve New Yorkers, non-Catholic and Catholic alike.

There is no time to wait.

New Yorkers are hungry.
Help us Feed Our Neighbors now.

Click here to donate through Catholic Charities and type “Feeding Our Neighbors” in the comments field.

Reading this on your cell phone?  Text “CCHOPE” to 85944 to make a quick $10 donation.

Dollar-for-Dollar Matching Offer Doubles Your Feeding Our Neighbors Donations

Monday, January 27th, 2014

By Alice Kenny

Check the thermometer daily to see how your contribution helps feed our neighbors

The numbers are frightening:  One out of five New York families struggle to feed their children.

Join us in fighting back.  Join now and join fast.

Right now, thanks to time-sensitive matching contribution offers, we can make your donation to fight hunger go farther with our 2014 Feeding Our Neighbors campaign.

An anonymous donor just added a $6,000 dollar-for-dollar matching offer to the New York States Council Knights of Columbus Charities $1,000 dollar-for-dollar match.  That means that this week, with your help, we will have at least $12,000 towards our goal of funding one million meals for hungry New Yorkers.

But you must act quickly.  The Feeding Our Neighbors campaign that kicked off on January 26 ends this Sunday, February 2.

Feeding Our Neighbors is a united effort to fight hunger. Initially launched by Timothy Cardinal Dolan in 2011 and run for the past two years in partnership with UJA-Federation, it responds to Timothy Cardinal Dolan’s call that we all do our part to replenish the food pantries and soup kitchens in our community that so many rely on to survive.

Click here to donate - and write “Feeding Our Neighbors” in the comments field.

Reading this on your smart phone?  Text CCHOPE to 85944 to make a one-time $10 donation.   (Standard text rates apply.)

Feeding Our Neighbors Campaign

Sunday, January 26th, 2014

By Alice Kenny

To confront the crisis of growing hunger in New York, we kick off today, Sunday, January 26, Feeding Our Neighbors.  This united campaign to fight hunger responds  to Timothy Cardinal Dolan’s call that we all do our part to replenish the food pantries and soup kitchens that so many families in our community rely on to survive.

To further this effort, Msgr. Kevin Sullivan just met with one of our state’s top elected officials, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, to share the Catholic Charities perspective on hunger and food insufficiency.  The Senator convened a very small policy roundtable this Sunday with leaders of food provider organizations and key advocates to discuss the impact of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) cuts in New York.

More and more New Yorkers have been reaching out to soup kitchens to feed their families,  reports CBS News in this just-released report*:

  • New research released this week by the Food Bank for New York City reveals that most of the city’s food pantries have seen a sharp increase in visitors.
  • The trend follows a $5 billion national cut to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program that went into effect Nov. 1.
  • The cuts affect nearly 2 millionNew York City residents who receive benefits from the program.

 

Feeding Our Neighbors, sponsored by organizations throughout the Archdiocese of New York and managed by Catholic Charities, will use 100% of contributions to the campaign to support local food pantries that serve New Yorkers, non-Catholic and Catholic alike.

Please join us in Feeding Our Neighbors.

The time is now, January 26th - Sunday, February 2nd  2014.

Take one small action to help feed the hungry.

Together, we can change lives.
Support a Fundraising Drive.

Donate through Catholic Charities and type “Feeding Our Neighbors” in the comments field.

Text “CCHOPE” to 85944 to make a quick $10 donation.


Feed the Big White Box.

Bring non-perishable foods to a “Feeding Our Neighbors” food drive at any Catholic parish in the New York Archdiocese, the Catholic Charities headquarters at1011 First Avenue, or anyArchdio cesan Catholic School.

 

*Check out the report on CBS news.

Martin Luther King: “Life’s Most Persistent and Urgent Question”

Monday, January 20th, 2014

By Alice Kenny

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. said  that “life’s most persistent and urgent question is ‘what are you doing for others?’”

Today, as they celebrate Martin Luther King Jr.’s Interfaith Day of Service, 80 Catholic and Jewish teens from Westchester are giving an answer.

Forty youth from St. Peter’s Parish in Yonkers and Holy Rosary in Port Chester will join 40 youth from UJA-Federation to provide a meal and activities for 300 persons in need at the Don Bosco Community Center in Port Chester.

The day starts early for these 80 teens as they set up, prepare and serve midday meals.  They will also offer art and crafts activities for children attending the event.

The day then ends as youth lead an ecumenical period of reflection; an opportunity to build community while raising hunger awareness.

The event is part of Feeding Our Neighbors, an interfaith campaign to replenish food pantries and soup kitchens that serve those in need.

“What are you doing for others?” Rev. King asked.

Join us in answering this urgent question.

 

Read more in the Daily Voice.

Feeding Our Neighbors; A United Effort to Fight Hunger

Friday, January 17th, 2014

By Alice Kenny

The Feeding Our Neighbors Campaign, initially launched by Timothy Cardinal Dolan in 2011 and run for the past two years in partnership with UJA-Federation, kicks off this interfaith initiative in a big way this Sunday, January 19, at St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

Timothy Cardinal Dolan, Monsignor Kevin Sullivan, Catholic Charities Board Member Susan Salice and Catholic Charities Special Assistant to the Director Luz Tavarez-Salazar will join with Knights of Columbus State Deputy Carmine Musumeci as well as representatives from UJA-Federation and fellow dignitaries to announce this year’s campaign.   It will run from January 26 –  February 2.

There is just one goal for Feeding Our Neighbors, that New Yorkers – no matter their faith – answer the call to feed those who are hungry and in need in our community.

A united effort to fight hunger, Feeding Our Neighbors is a response to Cardinal Dolan’s call that we all do our part to replenish the food pantries and soup kitchens in our community, which so many families in our community rely on to survive.

Now, with more than 1.7 million people in New York City living in poverty and one out of five children without enough to eat, we are prepared to collect food and funds for an additional 1,000,000 meals.  The first year we raised 500,000 additional meals. Last year the Feeding Our neighbors campaign raised close to 750,000 additional meals.

Sponsored by Catholic organizations throughout the Archdiocese of New York and managed by Catholic Charities and UJA-Federation of New York, two of the largest faith-based, not-for-profit organizations in New York, 100% of contributions to the campaign will support local food pantries that serve New Yorkers, non-Catholic and Catholic alike.

Participating organizations will load food donations on to Catholic Charities’ Mobile Food Pantry and Bronx Jewish Community Council trucks on Sunday for delivery food pantries, soup kitchens and meal programs that serve New Yorkers in need.

“I am delighted that we are partnering with old, as well as, new friends,” said Msgr. Kevin Sullivan.”  “Thanks to all!”

Take one small action this January to help feed the hungry. Together, we can change lives.

Join us in Feeding Our Neighbors.

Check out the story on NY1.