Standards and Double Standards

The Holy See is getting a considerable amount of flak from the United Nations, self-appointed victim advocacy groups, and the media about not having firm world-wide policies requiring all sexual abuse cases to be reported to local law enforcement.  We’ve had such a policy here in the United States for years, and it’s been very effective.   It’s a high standard — it shows how seriously we take sexual abuse cases, and demonstrates our commitment to eradicating it from our midst.

So here’s an interesting question — why aren’t people giving the White House the same kind of flak?

The Administration just issued a report on sexual violence on campus.  It garnered a great deal of media attention, and was applauded for showing a deep commitment to fighting  this very serious problem.

But their new guidelines won’t require colleges to report all allegations of sexual assault to local law enforcement.   In fact, not only do they not require it, they justify the practice of not reporting cases, and instead encourage schools to do their own independent investigations and hold their own quasi-judicial proceedings.  (See page 15 of their recent report).  In contrast, we not only report all credible allegations, we defer to law enforcement authorities in the handling of cases, and have strict policies that ensure that we do nothing that would interfere or impede those efforts.

So, the Catholic Church has a stronger policy against sexual violence than the United States Government and American universities.

Does anyone expect that the Church will get any credit for that in the media, or that the US Government will ever be accused of “torture” because of their policies?

There are standards, and double standards.

 

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