Posts Tagged ‘Religion in Public Life’

Scurrilous Accusations Against Christians

Friday, July 14th, 2017

In the current state of political discourse in the United States, it seems as if we have moved beyond the point where we can actually have rational reasonable arguments with each other. All too many people have descended back to the schoolyard, and are simply calling people names.

The cause of my reflection on this lamentable trend is the appearance of several news stories about the Attorney General speaking to the group Alliance Defending Freedom. There’s certainly nothing remarkable about a high-ranking public official who is a prominent lawyer speaking to another group of attorneys. The Attorney General is a political and social conservative and Alliance Defending Freedom is a well-known defender of traditional moral values when it comes to life, marriage and religious liberty. So it’s hard to see anything newsworthy about such a commonplace event. And, in fact, the speech itself was nothing extraordinary. It was a well-balanced defense of the role of religion in our society and the importance of religious liberty.

But nothing is so simple in our modern age. Several major news outlets covered this story before the text of the speech was released, and prominently repeated a despicable slander against ADF propagated by an advocacy organization called the Southern Poverty Law Center. The SPLC is a self-appointed watchdog over “hate groups” around the country. There certainly are many hate groups around the country who are dedicated to violent action motivated by bias, and it’s a good thing that someone is keeping an eye on them. In reality though, the SPLC is not a neutral agency like the FBI, but is instead a partisan advocacy organization for socially progressive causes, especially so-called gay rights, and a prodigious fund-raiser based on that advocacy.

Because ADF has the temerity to disagree with SPLC on those issues, the SPLC has designated them a “hate group”, and the media has now compliantly parroted the calumny. All that you need to do to qualify as a so-called “hate group” in the eyes of the SPLC is to disagree with them about issues like the effects of sexual hedonism on society, or the morality of homosexual conduct, same-sex “marriage”, and “transgender” rights. In other words, if you’re not with the progressive program you are a “hater”.

Now the SPLC can call people any name they like, since it is still a free country. But what’s really outrageous is that so-called reputable news organizations uncritically repeat the outrageous calumnies of the SPLC as if they were credible and objective, rather than the ideological name-calling that they really are.

We really shouldn’t be too surprised at this though. The Supreme Court in its decisions about homosexuality has been slandering people for years who have the nerve to hold to traditional moral values on sexuality. In 1996, the Court said that the only conceivable reason for a law passed by referendum that excluded sexual orientation from civil rights laws was “a bare . . . desire to harm a politically unpopular group” — in other words, pure malice. In 2013, the Court upped the ante when it struck down the federal Defense of Marriage Act and said that the virtually unanimous Congress and the Democratic president who signed the law we’re motivated by a “bare . . . desire to harm”, “disparage and injure”, “demean”, and “impose a stigma” on homosexual people. Justice Scalia rightly dissented from that decision and accused the court of declaring anyone opposed to same-sex “marriage” an enemy of the human race. Finally, in 2015 when the Supreme Court invented a right to same-sex “marriage”, the Court again accused those of us who believe in authentic marriage as being motivated by a desire to “demean or stigmatize” homosexuals, and even to “disparage their choices and diminish their personhood”.

When the highest court in the land says such things, then the message goes out that anyone who disagrees with the progressive agenda is irrational and bigoted, with no legitimate motivations and no opinions worthy of respect. That gives the SPLC and their allies in the media carte blanche to slander groups like ADF as “haters”. Others have barely avoided the term “hate” by using other words of disapprobation, such as “odious”, “bigoted”, “unkind”, “hurtful”, “intolerant”, and “needlessly cruel”. But the message is the same.

What the Supreme Court, the SPLC, and the media have not — yet — come out to say, however, is that what they are describing as “hate” is normal, mainstream, traditional, historical, Christian belief. By the way, that includes the beliefs contained in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, which have been held and taught by the Church since its founding.

Make no mistake about it. The supposedly “hateful” position that traditional orthodox Christians are accused of holding is the firm conviction based in Revelation, science, reason and tradition that maleness and femaleness are not accidental or arbitrary, that they have a meaning and a purpose oriented to unity of man and woman in marriage and the procreation of children, that homosexual desires and homogenital activity are incompatible with that meaning and purpose, and that a person can live a healthy and fulfilling life without acting on all of their sexual desires.

That’s not hate, that’s truth embedded deep into human nature, and it cannot be changed no matter what courts or advocacy groups say. And it doesn’t mean hating anyone – those of us who hold those beliefs still love our relatives, friends and neighbors who disagree with us.

Let me get back to ADF. I am very familiar with their work. I have been to their legal Academies, I have collaborated with their attorneys, and I have friends who are closely associated with them. I admire many of those in leadership positions there. I have found that they are an altruistic, heroic group of committed Christians who have sacrificed much to defend life, marriage, and religious liberty. They have done nothing to deserve the calumnies of the SPLC and the media. In fact they have done much to deserve the applause and support of all Americans who cherish traditional morality and decency, and the freedom to live by those values — and of those who disagree with them but defend their rights to free expression. Maybe the reason that groups like SPLC dislike ADF so much is that they’re so successful – they’ve won a number of key victories in court, including major cases in the Supreme Court.

Even in an era of debased public conversation, accusing people of “hatred” is a sign of intellectual bankruptcy, and indicates that you’ve lost the argument or that you don’t have enough confidence in your position to defend it. If you disagree with our positions on life, marriage and religious freedom, oppose us openly in the public square, legislatures and the courts. Don’t hide behind schoolyard insults.

Welcome to the Arena

Saturday, June 10th, 2017

[I had the honor of being invited to address the graduates of The Montfort Academy. This high school is a gem — a truly, entusiastically and unapologetically Catholic school that focuses on classical learning and guiding the personal and spiritual growth of their students. May God bless those grads and the faculty and staff of Montfort. This is the text of my address.]

I would like to thank the faculty and staff of the Montfort Academy for inviting me to speak to the graduating class today. It is an honor to be able to participate in this great enterprise of Catholic education.

We all know that high school graduation is a significant milestone in our lives. No matter how old we are, we probably remember our own graduation very clearly. We tend to look at it as the dawn of adulthood and our entry into the world at large. I hope and trust that your school and family have been safe and nurturing environments, in which you were respected and valued. Unfortunately, I have to tell something that you probably know already — you are stepping into a world that is not like that at all.

Welcome to the arena. I use the word “arena” very deliberately. It has particular significance to us Christians, calling to mind the early martyrs and confessors, heroes in the face of the hostility of the world. They were people of great courage and virtue. I also use the word “virtue” deliberately, because I know that your classical education has been deeply immersed in the development of virtue. So you have an excellent foundation for the challenges that lie ahead.

That’s good, because the arena is a tough place. Our modern world is very hostile to the message of the Gospel and to those who bring it. We see it every day in the news. Threats to religious liberties by our government; open hatred and contempt towards our faith and our Church in the media, and probably in most of the universities that you will be attending; threats to human life at the beginning, end and every point in between; attacks on the very meaning of what it is to be a man and a woman; and when we look beyond our borders, bloody persecutions in other lands. Powerful forces in our culture want people of faith to sit down, shut up, and leave their faith at home in private. And they are using the force of law and social pressure to make sure that we either conform to their views or we pay the price.

We have to be clear, though, that our battle is not just with the forces of the world — governments, media, entertainment, etc. It is a spiritual struggle as well. In fact, this is the most serious and difficult part of being in the arena. As St. Paul said, “our struggle is not with flesh and blood but… with the evil spirits in the heavens.” (Ephesians 6:12) We cannot opt out of this spiritual battle. And we are called to choose whose banner we will follow – God’s or His Enemy’s.

Make no mistake, once you step into the arena, you’ll will feel it in your heart and soul – because that’s where the real battle is taking place. I recall once being in the State Capitol, going to a meeting with a high-ranking and hostile legislator about an abortion bill. I could feel the sense of opposition as I went to the meeting, as if I was walking into a strong headwind or swimming upstream. Just the other day, a colleague and I were at a conference run by assisted suicide advocates, and we could feel the evil in the room. In times like these we really need to listen to St. Paul’s advice, and draw our strength from the Lord and from his mighty power, and put on the armor of God so that we can stand firm against the Evil One (see Ephesians 6:10-11).

In the face of all these challenges, the worst mistake we could make would be to huddle together in small communities with only people who think like ourselves, and hope that someday somhow things will get better in the outside world. No. That’s a response of despair and defeat. Too much is at stake to do that.

We are called to build the kind of society that God wants us to live in. And so we need to arm ourselves with certain virtues that I’d like to talk about.

To illustrate this, I’ll call on the example of two of my favorite people from history – George Washington and Joan of Arc. Two soldiers who fought for great causes against overwhelming odds in a hostile world. They have a lot to teach us about how to fight our fight.

First and foremost, they had the virtue of trust in God.

I think of George Washington on Christmas Eve 1776. His army had suffered a series of defeats by the most powerful army in the world. He faced the likelihood of his army melting away. It would have been easy to think that defeat was inevitable. But Washington had absolute confidence that God supported what he called “the Glorious Cause”. As he put it once in a letter, “as far as the strength of our reason and religion can carry us, a cheerful acquiescence to the Divine Will, is what we are to aim at”. With that attitude, he trusted in Providence and went on the attack, turning the tide of the war at the Battle of Trenton, and saving the cause of independence.

Think also of Joan of Arc in 1429. Her homeland was torn and devastated by civil war and foreign invasion. She had been receiving private revelations for years from St. Michael, St. Catherine and St. Margaret. They had assured her that God had a special plan for her, and she believed them. But it was an astounding plan – God wanted this illiterate peasant girl, perhaps 17 years old, with no military experience at all, to lead the French Army to victory and make sure that the king was crowned and anointed with sacred oil. If ever there was something to scoff at, that was it. Imagine if one of you ladies went to the Pentagon and said that God had sent you to win our wars. But Joan never doubted, she trusted God. She pursued her mission with passion and tenacity, overcoming all skeptics and opponents and obstacles. She achieved a remarkable series of victories in battle, and she stood beside the king as he was crowned and anointed, just as God had promised.

We need trust in God in our struggles today. Don’t ever forget that God has a specific design and plan for each one of you. He has a design and plan for our nation. God cares what we do, how we live, what our laws are, how we are governed. Discerning His plan is difficult, but when we understand what it is, we must hold firm to it and place our trust in Him.

The second virtue is a purity of heart. By this, I don’t mean the theological virtue of detachment from sin (which we all need). I mean a kind of selflessness and humility that puts other people and the cause ahead of our own self-interest.

Whenever Washington was asked to assume a new office he spoke of his sense of unworthiness, and his fear of disappointing those who were entrusting him with his duties. At the end of the Revolutionary War, and again at the end of his second presidential term, Washington didn’t seize ultimate power, as many victorious military leaders have done. Instead, he put the nation above himself, and he gladly returned to private life. When hearing that Washington might retire voluntarily, King George said that “If he does that, he will be the greatest man in the world!”  But so he did, and so he was.

Joan, too, was a great example of this virtue. Having come from poverty, she never asked for riches or titles or honors. Her greatest wish was to complete her mission and then return home to her parents. Surrounded by ambitious and conniving courtiers, she stood out for her simplicity and lack of egotism. Serving God was the entire purpose of her mission and her life, not personal glory. As a sign of this, she wore only one piece of jewelry, a simple gold ring, a gift from her mother, with the plain engraving of the names of Jesus and Mary. That was enough honor for her. At the trial that led to her unjust execution, Joan offered a statement that sums up her purity of heart: “I came from God. There is nothing more for me to do here! Send me back to God, from Whom I came!”

Purity of heart is essential for our leaders and for the success of our cause.
But it is in short supply. Think of the public figures who revel in their celebrity status or constantly resort to bragging or self-advancement. That erodes trust and breeds suspicion and cynicism. It also encourages division in our ranks. We need purity of heart to stay strong and united. As the Bible says, One person standing alone can be overcome, two together can resist, but a cord of three strands is hard to break. (Ecc 4:12)

The final virtue is boldness. This is a form of courage, but it’s more than that. It’s a sense of freedom and honesty, being able to act on one’s deepest beliefs, unrestrained by fear or self-consciousness, certain of the truth and justice and inevitable triumph of one’s cause.

Washington repeatedly showed boldness in battle, both in his personal conduct and in his strategy. Several times he exposed himself to enemy fire in order to rally his soldiers. On that Christmas Eve in 1776 when all hope seemed lost, he led his men on an impossible venture – crossing a frozen river and marching through a blizzard to surprise and defeat the enemy at Trenton. A bold stroke, and a decisive one.

Joan’s boldness was legendary. She took a defeated, disheartened and demoralized French army and galvanized it into action. She rejected counsels of caution and attacked the enemy directly and decisively. She led her troops from the front of every battle, with her standard in her hand. When things were going badly she refused to retreat, but rallied the troops and attacked again. When asked if she was afraid, she said: “I fear nothing for God is with me!” Old hardened soldiers, with years of battle experience, willingly followed this young girl – they followed her up the battlements and they would have followed her anywhere. So would I.

Every generation faces its own battles. Washington and Joan fought for freedom and justice for their nations, against steep odds. The battle we face is similar, and just as daunting. We are in a struggle to define our culture and our nation, to determine what kind of people we are, and how we are going to live together. We defend human life at every stage against what the Holy Father calls a “throwaway culture” that would just get rid of inconvenient lives. We stand for authentic masculinity and femininity, and the truth about human love and sexuality. We stand up and fight for poor, powerless, sick and suffering people in a culture that would rather avert its gaze and ignore them. We speak the truth of God’s will in a culture that rejects the very idea of truth.

Pope Francis once said: “Even today the message of the Church is the message of the path of boldness, the path of Christian courage… [and] the path of Christian courage is a grace given by the Holy Spirit.” So when we step out into the arena, we are not alone. We stand with the Holy Spirit, with Our Blessed Mother, our guardian angels, the heavenly hosts and the communion of saints. With them, we can truly say with the Psalm, “The LORD is my strength and my shield; in him my heart trusts” (Psalm 28:7). We can also hold on to the words of Jesus: “In the world you will have trouble, but take courage, I have conquered the world.” (Jn 16:33)

This is a difficult time. But this is a time for trust in God. This is a time for purity of heart. This is a time for boldness. This is a time for heroes. This is a time for you.

Welcome to the Arena. Congratulations and God bless.